The London Daily Newsletter Thursday 2 February

On 2 February 1943, the last German troops in the Soviet city of Stalingrad surrendered to the Red Army, ending one of the pivotal battles of World War II. In their attempt to take Stalingrad, the German Sixth Army faced a bitter Red Army under General Vasily Zhukov employing the ruined city to their advantage, transforming destroyed buildings and rubble into natural defensive fortifications. In a method of fighting the Germans began to call the Rattenkrieg, or “Rat’s War,” the opposing forces broke into squads eight or 10 strong and fought each other for every house and yard of territory. The battle saw rapid advances in street-fighting technology, such as a German machine gun that shot around corners and a light Russian plane that glided silently over German positions at night, dropping lethal bombs without warning. However, both sides lacked necessary food, water, or medical supplies, and tens of thousands perished every week. Starvation and the bitter Russian winter took many lives, and on 21 January 1943, the last of the airports held by the Germans fell to the Soviets, completely cutting the Germans off from supplies. On 31 January, Von Paulus surrendered German forces in the southern sector, and on 2 February the remaining German troops surrendered. Only 90,000 German soldiers were still alive, and of these only 5,000 troops would survive the Soviet prisoner-of-war camps and make it back to Germany.

Woodford Green
Woodford Green, historically part of Essex, it was absorbed into Greater London in 1965.

Part of the suburb of Woodford in northeast London, Woodford Green lies within the London Borough of Redbridge – though part of the western green (known as the Woodford Side) falls under the Borough of Waltham Forest. Woodford Green is surrounded by forests, lakes, country parks and open spaces. The A104 bisects Woodford Green, forming its high street.


TUM Book Club: Old Covent Garden
The magic of the old Covent Garden Market is evoked through Clive Boursnell’s photographs, taken over the course of numerous visits to Covent Garden in the 1960s and 1970s.

In the late 1960s and early 1970s Clive Boursnell, then a young photographer, shot thousands of photographs of the old Covent Garden, documenting the end of an era before the markets moved out of central London. Boursnell captured these last days of the market over a period of six years, from 1968 until the market’s closure, in a series of beautiful portraits of the feisty life of a city institution.


’The Thames at Westminster’ Colin Burns grew up in a Norfolk seaside town. From the age of seven, he began to paint landscapes and sunsets and, as a nine year old, started winning art prizes at school. At the age of sixteen he left school and qualified as an accountant, painting in his spare time

Colin W Burns (born 1944)

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The London Daily Newsletter Thursday 2 February

On 2 February 1943, the last German troops in the Soviet city of Stalingrad surrendered to the Red Army, ending one of the pivotal battles of World War II. In their attempt to take Stalingrad, the German Sixth Army faced a bitter Red Army under General Vasily Zhukov employing the ruined city to their advantage, transforming destroyed buildings and rubble into natural defensive fortifications. In a method of fighting the Germans began to call the Rattenkrieg, or “Rat’s War,” the opposing forces broke into squads eight or 10 strong and fought each other for every house and yard of territory. The battle saw rapid advances in street-fighting technology, such as a German machine gun that shot around corners and a light Russian plane that glided silently over German positions at night, dropping lethal bombs without warning. However, both sides lacked necessary food, water, or medical supplies, and tens of thousands perished every week. Starvation and the bitter Russian winter took many lives, and on 21 January 1943, the last of the airports held by the Germans fell to the Soviets, completely cutting the Germans off from supplies. On 31 January, Von Paulus surrendered German forces in the southern sector, and on 2 February the remaining German troops surrendered. Only 90,000 German soldiers were still alive, and of these only 5,000 troops would survive the Soviet prisoner-of-war camps and make it back to Germany.

Harold Hill
Harold Hill is an area in the London Borough of Havering and a district centre in the London Plan.

The name Harold Hill refers to Harold Godwinson who once held the manor of Havering-atte-Bower. Romford was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1937 and governed by Romford Borough Council, which was the local authority during the construction of the Harold Hill estate. The housing development of Harold Hill was conceived in the Greater London Plan of 1944 in order to alleviate the housing shortages of Inner London. Before construction of the estate – completed in 1958 – it was the location of Dagnam Park house and grounds. Most of the land for the estate was purchased in 1947 by the London County Council. The area was within the designated Metropolitan Green Belt, but an exception was made for the development because of the housing need in London following the Second World War. Construction of 7631 permanent homes, housing 25 000 people, began in 1948 and was complete by 1958. The development is fairly low density with large sections of parkland retained in the centre and edges of the estate. The Municipal Borough of Romford was abolished in 1965 and Harold Hill became part of the London Borough of Havering in Greater London.


TUM Book Club: Tube Mapper Project
Photographer Luke Agbaimoni created the Tube Mapper project allowing him to be creative, fitting photography around his lifestyle and adding stations on his daily commute.

The Underground is the backbone of the city of London, a part of our identity. It’s a network of shared experiences and visual memories, and most Londoners and visitors to the city will at some point have an interaction with the London Underground tube and train network. Photographer Luke Agbaimoni gave up city-scape night photography after the birth of his first child, but creating the Tube Mapper project allowed him to continue being creative, fitting photography around his new lifestyle and adding stations on his daily commute. His memorable photographs consider such themes as symmetry, reflections, tunnels and escalators, as well as simply pointing out and appreciating the way the light falls on a platform in an evening sunset. This book reveals the London every commuter knows in a unique, vibrant and arresting style.


An Omnibus Ride to Piccadilly Circus, Mr Gladstone Travelling with Ordinary Passengers (1885) Credit: Alfred Morgan (1862-1904) This painting shows Mr Gladstone, the British Prime Minister, travelling with ordinary passengers. The description of the painting also says that it includes a self portrait. Thus we can perhaps assume that the artist, Alfred Morgan, is seated next to the window on the left-hand side.

Alfred Morgan (1862-1904)

Video: Flying into LCY
A simulated flight into LCY courtesy of Google Earth Studio.

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The London Daily Newsletter Wednesday 1 February

On 1 February 2003, the US space shuttle Columbia broke up as it re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere killing all seven astronauts on board. It was the first time there had been an accident on landing in the 42 years of space flight. President George Bush told a nation in shock: “The Columbia is lost. There are no survivors.” Six of the seven astronauts were US citizens. They were Rick Husband, William McCool, Michael Anderson, David Brown, and female astronauts Laurel Clark and Indian-born Kalpana Chawla. The seventh – fighter pilot Colonel Ilan Ramon – was Israel’s first astronaut and was carrying with him a miniature Torah scroll of a Holocaust survivor. Columbia disintegrated just 16 minutes before it was due to land at Cape Canaveral in Florida.

Laleham
Laleham is a village beside the River Thames, immediately downriver from Staines-upon-Thames in the Spelthorne borough of Surrey. Until 1965 the village was in Middlesex.

The name Laleham” probably derives from lael meaning ’twig’ and ’ham’ meaning homestead. Iron Age spearheads from the 5th century have been found in the River Thames at Laleham Ferry. The Middlesex section of the Domesday Book of 1086 records the village as Leleham. The manor was held partly by Fécamp Abbey from Robert of Mortain and partly by Estrild, a nun. The manor of Laleham was later held by Westminster Abbey. In the 13th century Westminster Abbey had a grange and watermill on the banks of the Thames near the site of Laleham Abbey. The Church of England parish church of All Saints dates from the 12th century but was largely rebuilt in brick about 1600 and the present tower was built in 1780. Today, Laleham has a Church of England primary school, an archery club and Burway Rowing Club. The poet Matthew Arnold (1822–88) lived here, dividing his time between Laleham and Rugby School.


TUM Book Club: Old Covent Garden
The magic of the old Covent Garden Market is evoked through Clive Boursnell’s photographs, taken over the course of numerous visits to Covent Garden in the 1960s and 1970s.

In the late 1960s and early 1970s Clive Boursnell, then a young photographer, shot thousands of photographs of the old Covent Garden, documenting the end of an era before the markets moved out of central London. Boursnell captured these last days of the market over a period of six years, from 1968 until the market’s closure, in a series of beautiful portraits of the feisty life of a city institution.


Battersea Power Station

Robert Lowry/Wandsworth Museum

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Getting around London with Oyster

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The London Daily Newsletter Wednesday 1 February

On 1 February 2003, the US space shuttle Columbia broke up as it re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere killing all seven astronauts on board. It was the first time there had been an accident on landing in the 42 years of space flight. President George Bush told a nation in shock: “The Columbia is lost. There are no survivors.” Six of the seven astronauts were US citizens. They were Rick Husband, William McCool, Michael Anderson, David Brown, and female astronauts Laurel Clark and Indian-born Kalpana Chawla. The seventh – fighter pilot Colonel Ilan Ramon – was Israel’s first astronaut and was carrying with him a miniature Torah scroll of a Holocaust survivor. Columbia disintegrated just 16 minutes before it was due to land at Cape Canaveral in Florida.

Hacton
Hacton is a small dispersed settlement located within the London Borough of Havering.

Hacton is located in the countryside between two London suburban towns, Upminster and Rainham. The name means ’farmstead on a hook-shaped piece of land’ and refers to an area next to the River Ingrebourne. It was historically a hamlet in the ancient parish of Upminster with a long history – a Romano-British farmstead was discovered west of Corbets Tey during gravel-digging in 1962. In medieval Upminster there seem to have been three clusters of settlement – Upminster village and the hamlets of Hacton and Corbets Tey.In addition to the three settlements medieval dwellings were scattered through the parish. Hacton and its bridge already existed in 1299. The hamlet expanded slowly. High House and Hoppy Hall on the Corbets Tey road, were probably built in the early 17th century – both were demolished in 1935–6. Hacton Bridge was originally manorial. In the 1630s it was a horse-bridge, but in the 1660s local inhabitants persuaded the carpenter in charge of its repair to make it a cart-bridge, since the road was much used by those taking corn to Romford market. In 1674 quarter sessions ordered the retention of the cart-bridge with the county paying two-thirds of the cost of its upkeep. A brick bridge was built in 1728. A late-18th-century map shows a road pattern which remained almost unaltered until the 20th century. Hacton Lane entered Upminster parish at Hacton bridge and ran south to Hacton Corner. It continued as Aveley Road, forming the parish boundary with Rainham and Aveley. South of Upminster, Gaynes Lane turned west from Corbets Tey Road at Gaynes Cross to join Hacton Lane north of Hacton Corner. The late-16th-century Park Corner Farm at Hacton was destroyed by bombing in the Second World War. From the mid 17th century onwards, successful Londoners were buying estates in Upminster. Between 1762 and 1765 William Braund built Hactons at the junction of Little Gaynes and Hacton Lanes. After military occupation during the Second World War, Hactons stood empty until 1954 when it was converted into flats. The Cock at Hacton was the earliest known inn in the parish, existing from 1685 but had closed by 1769. The White Hart, created out of two cottages, opened as a beer house in 1854. It was converted to a house in 2012. At the corner of Hacton Lane and Little Gaynes Lane, the Optimist – the only new Upminster inn of the 20th century – was opened in 1956. 19th-century rural depopulation led to the loss of the cottages that were once along Hacton Lane.


TUM Book Club: Tube Mapper Project
Photographer Luke Agbaimoni created the Tube Mapper project allowing him to be creative, fitting photography around his lifestyle and adding stations on his daily commute.

The Underground is the backbone of the city of London, a part of our identity. It’s a network of shared experiences and visual memories, and most Londoners and visitors to the city will at some point have an interaction with the London Underground tube and train network. Photographer Luke Agbaimoni gave up city-scape night photography after the birth of his first child, but creating the Tube Mapper project allowed him to continue being creative, fitting photography around his new lifestyle and adding stations on his daily commute. His memorable photographs consider such themes as symmetry, reflections, tunnels and escalators, as well as simply pointing out and appreciating the way the light falls on a platform in an evening sunset. This book reveals the London every commuter knows in a unique, vibrant and arresting style.


Hampstead Garden Suburb from Willifield Way (1914) Golders Green crematorium can be seen in the background

William Whitehead Ratcliffe/Tate

Video: You Can’t Always Get What You Wanstead
Jago Hazzard went to the far reaches of the Central Line

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The London Daily Newsletter Tuesday 31 January



Grahame Park
Grahame Park was built on the site of the old Hendon Aerodrome.

The estate is named in honour of Claude Grahame-White, the aviation pioneer who established the Hendon Aerodrome and aviation school on the site. Most roads, blocks and walkways have names linked to the aviation history of the site. The building of the estate was a joint project between the Greater London Council and Barnet Council. The estate was designed in a ’Brutalist. style and the first residents moved in during October 1971. Barnet Council is refurbishing much of the estate with a 2032 completion date. The Royal Air Force Museum is situated immediately to the south-east of the estate.


TUM Book Club: Old Covent Garden
The magic of the old Covent Garden Market is evoked through Clive Boursnell’s photographs, taken over the course of numerous visits to Covent Garden in the 1960s and 1970s.

In the late 1960s and early 1970s Clive Boursnell, then a young photographer, shot thousands of photographs of the old Covent Garden, documenting the end of an era before the markets moved out of central London. Boursnell captured these last days of the market over a period of six years, from 1968 until the market’s closure, in a series of beautiful portraits of the feisty life of a city institution.


London from Greenwich Park (1720) From the Dutch school of painting in vogue at the time, notable features of this painting are the palace in central Greenwich (later demolished), St Paul’s as the tallest London building on the horizon and a very green Isle of Dogs

Peter Tillemans (Bank of England Museum)

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Getting around London with Oyster

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The London Daily Newsletter Tuesday 31 January



Scratchwood
Scratchwood is an area on the edge of North London.

It was the former name of the London Gateway Services, named after woodland lying between the present M1 and A1. One of the apocryphal stories of London is that the guns of HMS Belfast, moored next to City Hall, are trained on Stratchwood Services.


TUM Book Club: Tube Mapper Project
Photographer Luke Agbaimoni created the Tube Mapper project allowing him to be creative, fitting photography around his lifestyle and adding stations on his daily commute.

The Underground is the backbone of the city of London, a part of our identity. It’s a network of shared experiences and visual memories, and most Londoners and visitors to the city will at some point have an interaction with the London Underground tube and train network. Photographer Luke Agbaimoni gave up city-scape night photography after the birth of his first child, but creating the Tube Mapper project allowed him to continue being creative, fitting photography around his new lifestyle and adding stations on his daily commute. His memorable photographs consider such themes as symmetry, reflections, tunnels and escalators, as well as simply pointing out and appreciating the way the light falls on a platform in an evening sunset. This book reveals the London every commuter knows in a unique, vibrant and arresting style.


View of a House and its Estate in Belsize, Middlesex (1696) London and its smoke is visible on the left horizon

Jan Siberechts/Tate Britain

Video: Flying into LCY
A simulated flight into LCY courtesy of Google Earth Studio.

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The London Daily Newsletter Monday 30 January



On this day in London history

1915: Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

1969: The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

Coulsdon
Coulsdon is a town mainly within the London Borough of Croydon, approximately 13 miles from Charing Cross.

The location forms part of the North Downs. The hills contain chalk and flint. Several dry valleys with natural underground drainage merge and connect to the headwaters of the River Wandle, here named the ’River Bourne’. Although the Bourne river floods periodically, the soil is generally dry and is the watershed which has constituted a natural route way across the Downs for early populations. Fossil records exist from the Pleistocene period (4 million years ago) There is evidence of human occupation from the Neolithic period, Iron Age, Anglo-Saxon, Bronze Age, Roman and Medieval. It appears as Colesdone in the Domesday Book. Most housing in Smitham (Bottom/Valley) and the clustered settlement of Old Coulsdon, as well as the narrower valley between them, was built in the 80 years from 1890 to 1970. The area developed mixed suburban and in its centre urban housing. Old Coulsdon occupies the south-east of the district. Scattered, rather than clustered are six listed buildings, for their national heritage and architectural value, at Grade II. It is the southernmost settlement in all of Greater London. At the heart of the geographical feature Smitham Bottom (where three dry valleys merge into one) is the central part of the district. Most commerce and industry is here, set beside the Brighton Road, which is since 2006 a town centre arc of the A23 road and on Chipstead Valley Road which terminates half way along the arc, leading directly to Woodmansterne.


TUM Book Club: Old Covent Garden
The magic of the old Covent Garden Market is evoked through Clive Boursnell’s photographs, taken over the course of numerous visits to Covent Garden in the 1960s and 1970s.

In the late 1960s and early 1970s Clive Boursnell, then a young photographer, shot thousands of photographs of the old Covent Garden, documenting the end of an era before the markets moved out of central London. Boursnell captured these last days of the market over a period of six years, from 1968 until the market’s closure, in a series of beautiful portraits of the feisty life of a city institution.


Impromptu Dance, a Scene on the Chelsea Embankment (1883)

Frederick Brown (1851-1941)

Video: Oyster
Getting around London with Oyster

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The London Daily Newsletter Monday 30 January



On this day in London history

1915: Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

North Ockendon
North Ockendon is the only area of Greater London which is outside the M25 orbital motorway.

North Ockendon parish had an ancient shape that was elongated east-west. With the adjoining parishes this formed a large estate that is at least middle-Saxon or, perhaps, even Roman or Bronze age. The parish church of St Mary Magdelene has a probably re-used Norman nave door on the south side of the nave. Its tower was used in the first accurate measurement of the speed of sound, by the Reverend William Derham, Rector of Upminster. Gunshots were fired from the tower and the flash thereof was observed by telescope from the tower of the church of St Laurence, Upminster; then the time was recorded until the sound arrived, from which, with an accurate distance measurement, the speed could be calculated. To the east is a small area of fenland, which extends into Bulphan and the rest is clays and Thames alluvials. The land is very low lying. The field boundaries are wholly rectilinear. To the far north, beyond the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway, it borders the villages of Great Warley, Little Warley and Childerditch in the borough of Brentwood, the settlements of West Horndon and Bulphan to the east and South Ockendon to the south which is in the borough and unitary authority of Thurrock. From 1894 until it was abolished in 1936, North Ockendon formed a parish in the Orsett Rural District of Essex. The majority of its former area was used to enlarge the Cranham parish of Hornchurch Urban District and the remainder of the former parish, around 383 acres was used to form part of Thurrock Urban District in 1936. In 1965 Hornchurch Urban District was abolished and its former area, including North Ockendon, was transferred to Greater London and used to form the present-day London Borough of Havering. North Ockendon and Great Warley were to the east of the M25 motorway when it was constructed. In 1992 it was proposed that the part of Greater London to the east of the M25 should be transferred to Essex, with the Great Warley section north of the railway transferred to Brentwood and the North Ockendon section to the south transferred to Thurrock. The transfer of North Ockendon from London to Essex was strongly opposed. Following the review the Great Warley section was transferred to Essex, but the North Ockendon part was not, leaving it the only part of Greater London to be outside the M25 motorway. North Ockendon is the location of Stubbers, a former stately home which was demolished in 1955.


TUM Book Club: Tube Mapper Project
Photographer Luke Agbaimoni created the Tube Mapper project allowing him to be creative, fitting photography around his lifestyle and adding stations on his daily commute.

The Underground is the backbone of the city of London, a part of our identity. It’s a network of shared experiences and visual memories, and most Londoners and visitors to the city will at some point have an interaction with the London Underground tube and train network. Photographer Luke Agbaimoni gave up city-scape night photography after the birth of his first child, but creating the Tube Mapper project allowed him to continue being creative, fitting photography around his new lifestyle and adding stations on his daily commute. His memorable photographs consider such themes as symmetry, reflections, tunnels and escalators, as well as simply pointing out and appreciating the way the light falls on a platform in an evening sunset. This book reveals the London every commuter knows in a unique, vibrant and arresting style.


The Building Of Westminster Bridge (1749)

Samuel Scott/Bank of England Museum

Video: You Can’t Always Get What You Wanstead
Jago Hazzard went to the far reaches of the Central Line

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The London Daily Newsletter Friday 27 January



South Mimms
South Mimms is a village in the Hertsmere district of Hertfordshire.

It is a small settlement located near to the junction of the M25 motorway with the A1(M) motorway and is perhaps more widely known because of the service station at that junction which takes its name from the village, and for mountain biking routes in the area which start from the service station. Before 1965’s creation of Greater London, it was part of Middlesex rather than Hertfordshire and, along with Potters Bar, was transferred to the latter county in that year.


TUM Book Club: Old Covent Garden
The magic of the old Covent Garden Market is evoked through Clive Boursnell’s photographs, taken over the course of numerous visits to Covent Garden in the 1960s and 1970s.

In the late 1960s and early 1970s Clive Boursnell, then a young photographer, shot thousands of photographs of the old Covent Garden, documenting the end of an era before the markets moved out of central London. Boursnell captured these last days of the market over a period of six years, from 1968 until the market’s closure, in a series of beautiful portraits of the feisty life of a city institution.


View of London from Southwark (c1630), section A forest of church spires. More morbidly, London Bridge displays heads on spikes at the southern gate

Dutch School (Museum of London)

Video: Oyster
Getting around London with Oyster

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The London Daily Newsletter Friday 27 January



Downham
The Downham Estate dates from the late 1920s.

The Downham Estate arrived on the scene in 1926, but its name originates in 1914 when the London County Council (LCC) agreed to build three large housing estates. The land was acquired in 1920. Downham covered the lands of two farms, Holloway Farm to the west and Shroffolds Farm to the north. Before the Estate was built, there had been little building south of Whitefoot Lane – many local residents took weekend walks over the ’Seven Fields’. The name ’Downham’ derives from Lord Downham who, as William Haynes Fisher was a former chairman of the LCC. Many of the road took their names from Tennyson’s ’Idylls of the King’. Other roads took their names from places in Devon. By summer 1930, 6000 houses had been completed by builders Holland, Hannen & Cubbits. An additional section of just over 1000 houses was developed at Whitefoot lane in 1937 by builders Higgs & Hill and generally known as ’North Downham’. On completion, some 30 000 people lived on Downham’s newly built Estate. Generally people commuted to work elsewhere. A cheap “workman’s ticket” from Grove Park station became available from November 1928. Shopping facilities came to the the New Bromley Road in 1926, followed by centres at Grove Park, Burnt Ash Lane and one adjacent to the Downham Tavern. The Downham Tavern was the only public house built on the area owned by the LCC. It was for some years considered the world’s largest pub, containing a Dance Hall, Beer Garden, two Saloon Bars, a Public Lounge, a Lunchroom where service was by waiter only. When Downham was first built, it was regarded as a showpiece. A Lewisham official guide from the 1930s described Downham as a ’Garden City’. By 1960, the first LCC houses were being put up for sale as local policy changed.


TUM Book Club: Tube Mapper Project
Photographer Luke Agbaimoni created the Tube Mapper project allowing him to be creative, fitting photography around his lifestyle and adding stations on his daily commute.

The Underground is the backbone of the city of London, a part of our identity. It’s a network of shared experiences and visual memories, and most Londoners and visitors to the city will at some point have an interaction with the London Underground tube and train network. Photographer Luke Agbaimoni gave up city-scape night photography after the birth of his first child, but creating the Tube Mapper project allowed him to continue being creative, fitting photography around his new lifestyle and adding stations on his daily commute. His memorable photographs consider such themes as symmetry, reflections, tunnels and escalators, as well as simply pointing out and appreciating the way the light falls on a platform in an evening sunset. This book reveals the London every commuter knows in a unique, vibrant and arresting style.


Queen’s Road Station, Bayswater (c. 1916) The artwork is a melange of two stations – the name comes from the old name for Queensway station but the depiction more resembles Bayswater station itself. The Camden Town Group was a group of English Post-Impressionist artists who gathered frequently at the studio of painter Walter Sickert in Camden Town.

Walter Richard Sickert (1860–1942)

Video: Flying into LCY
A simulated flight into LCY courtesy of Google Earth Studio.

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