A Topographical Dictionary of London

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To the Right Honourable the Lord Mayor, Aldermen and Common-Councilmen of The City of London; this work, illustrative of their Great City and its environs, The Metropolis of the British Empire, is dedicated with great respect,

by

their faithful and obedient servant, James Elmes.

London January 1, 1831

Preface

  • ABBEY PLACE, Bethnal Green Road, is the continuation of Mary’s Row, at the north east corner of Wilmot Square, about three quarters of a mile from Shoreditch.
  • ABBEY PLACE, Tavistock Mews, Russell Square, is the first turning on the left hand in Little Coram Street, at No. 53, Great Coram Street.
  • ABBEY PLACE, South Street, Lambeth, is at the corner of No. 11, in that street, and is nearly opposite the Three Stags, in the Westminster Bridge Road.
  • NORTH ABBEY PLACE, Bethnal Green Road, is at the north end of the first mentioned.
  • SOUTH ABBEY PLACE, Bethnal Green Road, is at the south end of the above mentioned.
  • ABBEY ROW, Bethnal Green Road, is a turning out of the above mentioned Abbey Place.
  • ABBEY STREET, Bethnal Green Road, is the first turning on the right, at No. 92, about half a mile from Shoreditch.
  • ABBEY STREET, Bermondsey, is a turning at No. 126, Bermondsey Street, Tooley Street, Southwark.
  • ABCHURCH COURT, in Abchurch Yard, Lombard Street.
  • ABCHURCH LANE, Lombard Street, leads from 67, Cannon Street, to the side of the Phoenix Fire Office, in Lombard Street, and is named from the adjacent church of St. Mary, Abchurch.
  • ABCHURCH YARD, Lombard Street, is the open space at the south end of St. Mary, Abchurch, in Abchurch Lane, aforesaid, near Cannon Street.
  • ABDY STREET, Horselydown, is a turning at No. 6, Broad Street, and a continuation of the east end of Tooley Street, leading to John Street, Horselydown.
  • ABEL'S BUILDINGS, Rosemary Lane, also called White's Buildings, is a turning at No. 94, and leads to Chamber Street, Goodman's Fields, named after its first ground landlord.
  • ABINGDON BUILDINGS, Westminster, is a turning between Nos. 16 and 17, Abingdon Street, at the east end of Old Palace Yard.
  • ABINGDON PLACE, Westminster, is three doors on the left from Old Palace Yard.
  • ABINGDON PLACE, Goswell Street Road, is a turning on the east side of Abingdon Row, it the south end of Charles Street, Northampton Square, Goswell Street Road.
  • ABINGDON STREET, Westminster, is at the end of Old Palace Yard, parallel to the Thames, and leads to Millbank Street.
  • LITTLE ABINGDON STREET, Westminster, is a turning at No. 10, Abingdon Street, before mentioned, and leads to the Thames.
  • ABOUKIR PLACE, Stepney, is near Pleasant Place and Prospect Place, Stepney Green, Commercial Road.
  • ACADEMY COURT, Chancery Lane, is �???opposite Symond's Inn, and near Carey Street, Lincoln's Inn.
  • ACADEMY, ROYAL]], OF ARTS. - [see Royal Academy of Arts]
  • ACADEMY, ROYAL]], OF MUSIC. - [see Royal Academy of Music]
  • ACADEMY, PUBLIC]], Homerton, is a public institution supported by a congregational fund for aiding dissenting ministers, and educating students for the ministry, at Homerton, near the church, Hackney.
  • ACCIDENTAL PLACE, Hackney Road, is a turning at No. 17, Bath Street, Cole Harbour Street, about three quarters of a mile on the left from Shoreditch Church.
  • ACHILLES, STATUE OF]], Hyde Park, was erected by a public subscription of ladies in honour of the victories of the Duke of Wellington, as appears by the following inscription on the massive granite pedestal, which supports this brazen Colossus:-

To ARTHUR DUKE OF WELLINGTON]], And his brave companions in arms, This statue of Achilles, Cast from cannon taken in the victories of Salamanca, Vittoria, Toulouse, and Waterloo, Is inscribed By their countrywomen. Placed on this spot On the XVIII. day of June MDCCCXXII. By command of His Majesty George III.

It is a restoration in bronze, by Richard Westmacott, Esq., R.A., of one of the celebrated groups on the Monte Cavallo at Rome, and is one of the finest specimens of sculptural brass-founding in Europe.

  • ACKWORTH BUILDINGS, Bermondsey, is in Blue Anchor Road, which is a continuation of the east end of the Grange Road, and leads to Mill Pond Bridge.
  • ACORN COURT, Bishopsgate Street, is a turning at No. 125, Bishopsgate Street Without.
  • ACORN STREET or COURT, Fetter Lane, is the first turning on the right hand in House Buildings, Fetter Lane, and leads through Whites Alley and Bream's Buildings, into Chancery Lane.
  • ACORN STREET, Camberwell, is a turning in Southampton Place, Southampton Street.
  • ACORN YARD, Rotherhithe, is a turning in Trinity Street, being a continuation of Lower Queen Street, Rotherhithe, parallel to the Thames, and leading to Russell Street and Greenland Dock.
  • ACRE PLACE, St. Pancras, is in the King's Road, by the side of the Workhouse.
  • ACTIVE PLACE, Bermondsey, is a turning out of Crown Place, Spa Road.
  • ACTON PLACE or STREET, Walworth, is in York Street, Walworth New Town, or Lock's Fields. It extends from, and is the continuation of, the end of York Street to Camden Street, leading to East Lane.
  • ACTON PLACE, Kingsland Road, is a row of houses on the east side of Kingsland Road, reaching from the north side of the Regent Canal to the south end of Kingsland Crescent.
  • ACTON STREET, Gray's Inn Road, turns off on the right, at No. 4, Constitution Row, about a quart�???er of a mile northward of Guilford Street, Foundling Hospital.
  • ADAM A-DIGGING YARD, Great Peter Street, Westminster, is on the south side nearly opposite Little St. Anne's Lane.
  • ADAM AND EVE COURT, Oxford Street, is a turning on the north side, nearly opposite to the Pantheon, and leads into Castle Street, Oxford Market.
  • ADAM AND EVE COURT, Whitecross Street, St. Luke's turns off at No. 106, about the middle of the east side.
  • ADAM AND EVE COURT, Bishopsgate Street Without, is in Angel Alley, near Skinner Street, and received its name from the sign at its corner, before numbering was introduced by Act of Parliament.
  • ADAM AND EVE COURT, Duke's Place, Aldgate, is the first turning on the left in Mitre Court, Aldgate, and leads through New Court into Long Street and Bury Street, St. Mary Axe.
  • ADAMS' COURT, Broad Street, City, turns off on the right from Threadneedle Street at No. 12, Broad Street, nearly opposite to Throgmorton Street.
  • ADAMS' MEWS, Upper Berkeley Street, Portman Square, leads from No. 44, Upper Berkeley Street, to Upper Seymour Street.
  • ADAMS' MEWS, South Audley Street, Grosvenor Square, leads from No. 36, South Audley Street, to Charles Street, Grosvenor Square.
  • ADAMS' PLACE, Southwark, is in High Street, turns off at No. 187, south of Union Street, and leads to Court of Common Council Street.
  • ADAMS' PLACE, Limehouse, is in Salmon's Lane, which leads from the north end of White Horse Street to the Commercial Road.
  • ADAMS' ROW, Hampstead Road, is the north side of the continuation of Tottenham Court Road, reaching from the north west corner of the New Road, where was formerly the Adam and Eve public house, represented in Hogarth's March to Finchley, to Henry Street, nearly opposite the New River Company's Reservoir.
  • ADAMS' ROW, Lambeth, is in Doughty Place, Doughty Street, between the Archbishop of Canterbury's Palace and Walcot Place, Westminster Bridge Road.
  • ADAMS' STREET, Portman Square, turns off on the east side of No. 7, Baker Street, and leads into Manchester Street.
  • ADAM'S STREET, WEST]], Portman Square, is the last turning on the right at the corner of No. 31, Upper Seymour Street, and leads northward across Upper Berkeley Street and Upper George Street, to the south end of Seymour Place, Crawford Street.
  • ADAM STREET, Adelphi, named after Messrs. Adam, the fraternal architects, who embellished this part of the metropolis. It turns off at No. 72, on the south side of the Strand, about a quarter of a mile from Temple Bar, and leads on the fine terrace called the Adelphi.
  • ADAM STREET, Rotherhithe, is the second street southward parallel to the Thames, leading from No. 93, Neptune Street, on the west, to Swan Lane, on the east, near to the Thames Tunnel.
  • ADAM STREET, Kent Road, turns off at No 20, Harper Street, County Terrace, in the Kent Road.
  • ADDLE HILL, Upper Thames Street, is the first turning on the left at the west end of Uppe�???r Thames Street from Earl Street, Blackfriars, and leads northward into Great Carter Lane, Doctors' Commons, near to St. Andrew's Churchyard.
  • ADDLE STREET, Aldermanbury, extends from No. 58, Aldermanbury, to Wood Street, Cheapside.
  • ADELPHI, THE]], is an assemblage of buildings, or rather a district of the metropolis, on the south side of the Strand, reaching east and west from Adam Street to Buckingham Street, bounded on the north by the Strand, and on the south by the Thames. This distinguished and beautiful portion of the metropolis was designed and executed by Messrs. John, Robert, James and William Adam, the well known architects, on the site of the ancient Durham Yard, then a district of mud and coal wharfs. On this low spot they erected a series of arches, terraces and subterranean streets and spread forth on their surface that variety of streets known by the name of \\ldblquote The Adelphi,\\rdblquote as being the production of \\ldblquote the brothers.\\rdblquote The various streets are designated after them, as that fine row of mansions which faces the Thames is called, by way of excellence, \\ldblquote the Adelphi Terrace;\\rdblquote and the other streets from their christian names, John Street, Robert Street, James Street and William Street. In this district is the mansion and repository of the Society for the Encouragement of Arts. [which see] Many splendid, family hotels and lodging houses, and beneath the streets, where carriages roll and pedestrians bend their careful way, is the largest assemblage of coal wharfs and warehouses on the banks of the Thames.
  • ADELPHI TERRACE, THE]], is the before mentioned row of mansions facing the Thames, erected parallel to the Strand and the river by Messrs. Adam. The view from this terrace, beginning at Westminster Bridge on the west, crowned by the antique towers of the Abbey, and Waterloo Bridge on the east, beautifully surmounted by the majestic cupola and elegant turrets of St. Paul's, is almost unequalled for variety and architectural beauty. The central situation of this fine terrace, and its airy and healthy qualities, have always rendered it among the most desirable spots in the metropolis for a town residence.
  • ADELPHI THEATRE, THE]], a small commodious theatre, which is opened under a licence from the Lord Chamberlain, for the performance of burlettas, ballets and pantomimes. It was originally opened by an ingenious and clever woman, a Miss Scott, who wrote, composed the music, and acted in her own pieces. It is now under the management of Messrs. Mathews and Yates, and is much patronized for the intellectuality of its dramatic pieces and the ability of its actors.
  • ADELPHI WHARFS, THE]], the before mentioned wharfs stand under the Adelphi streets and terrace. The principal access to them is down Durham Street, at No. 65, in the Strand, under the mansion and repository of the Society of Arts.
  • ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, for the dispatch of business belonging to that officer's department, is the first door on the left, going into the park, under the archway of the building called the Horse Guards, at Whitehall It is under the management of Lieut. General Sir Herbert Taylor, G.H.C., Adjutant-general; Major-general McDonald, Deputy Adjutant-general, an assistant adjutant-general, a deputy assistant adjutant-general, a first clerk, four senior clerks, and eight junior clerks.
  • ADMIRALTY COLLEGE ADVOCATES' OFFICE, is in Paul's Bakehouse Court, Doctors' Commons, about six doors on the right, by the side of No. 15, on the south side of St. Paul's Churchyard, down Paul's Chain. The hours of Attendance are from nine till seven.
  • ADMIRALTY, THE HIGH COURT OF]], this court of judicature is held in Doctors' Commons, a�???t the second house on the left from No. 7, Great Knight Rider Street, in the street so named. It is held under the jurisdiction of the Lord High Admiral, or the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, who take cognisance of all causes and pleas, criminal and civil, which relate to merchants and mariners. Their proceedings are guided by the principles of the civil law; but in criminal cases, as the trial of pirates, and crimes committed on the high seas, and upon large rivers below the first bridge which crosses them, the process is then conducted under a special commission from the crown, by a judge, jury and witnesses. Such trials are generally held at the Sessions house, in the Old Bailey. This court was erected in the reign of Edward III., and was originally held in Southwark. The officers of this court are the judge of the admiralty, who must be civilian, two advocates general, a counsel, a solicitor, two proctors, a registrar, and a marshal, who carries a silver oar before the judge. The present officers of this court are; Judge of the court, Right Hon. Sir Charles Robinson, D.C.L.; King's Advocate Generate Sir Herbert Jenner, D.C.L.; Admiralty ditto, James Henry Arnold, D.C.L.; Counsel to the Admiralty and Navy, Henry J. Shepherd, Esq.; Solicitor to the Admiralty and Navy, Charles Jones, Esq.; King's Proctor, Iltid Nicholl, Esq.; Admiralty ditto, William Townsend, Esq.; Registrar, Lord Arden.
  • ADMIRALTY OFFICE, Whitehall, is a short distance on the right from Charing Cross, and opposite to Great Scotland Yard. In this office are transacted all maritime affairs belonging to the jurisdiction of the Admiralty, who here regulate and direct the affairs of the Royal Navy, nominate admirals, captains and other officers to serve on board his Majesty's ships of war, and give orders for the trial of those who have failed in their duty, or have been guilty of any irregularity. - The building is of brick and stone, designed by Ripley, in the reign of George II., with a tetrastyle portico of the Ionic order, between two advancing wings, in such a wretched style as fully to justify the satirist, who said of this architect:-

\\ldblquote When Jones and Wren's united labours fall, And under Ripley rise a new Whitehall.\\rdblquote

Next the High Street is a very handsome screen of Portland stone, designed by Adams, in exquisite taste, decorated with sculptures of naval emblems. In this building are the offices and residences of the five Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. On the top of the building is erected a semaphore telegraph, which communicates orders and intelligence to and from the principal sea-ports of the Kingdom. The present chief officers of the Admiralty are the five Lords Commissioners, namely, the Right Hon. Lord Viscount Melville, K.T., Vice Admiral Sir George Cockburn, G.C.B., Vice Admiral Sir Henry Botham, K.C.B., Sir George Clerk, Bart., and Lord Viscount Castlereagh. First Secretary, John Wilson Croker, Esq., M.A.; Second Secretary, John Barrow, Esq., F.R.S.; Chief Clerk, John Dyer, Esq.; together with seven clerks of the first class, six of the second class, and ten of the third class.

  • ADULT ORPHAN INSTITUTION, founded for the relief and education of the friendless and orphan daughters of clergymen of the established Church, and of military and naval officers, is situated in the Regent's Park. It is under the patronage of the King and the Princess Augusta, with a committee of management, two trustees, four auditors, and other officers. The Rev. J. J. Elfis, M.A., one of the masters of Merchant Tailors' School, is the Secretary.
  • AFFIDAVIT OFFICE, Symond's Inn, Chancery Lane, the entrance to which is at No. 32, on the right �???hand side from Fleet Street. This office belongs to the Master in Chancery, where one or more attends to take affidavits, and in this office all affidavits belonging to the Court of Chancery are filed. The hours of attendance are from 9 to 2 in the forenoon, and from 4 to 8 in the afternoon in term time, and from 11 to 2 in vacation time. - N.B. Candles are not lighted from the last seal after Michaelmas term to the first seal before Hilary term.
  • AFRICAN AND ASIATIC SOCIETY, for the relief and instruction of poor Africans and Asiatics. The Duke of Sussex is Patron, Wm. Wilberforce Esq., President, and the Rev. W. B. Collyer, D.D., Secretary.
  • AFRICAN INSTITUTION, No. 3, Fluyer Street, Westminster, a society instituted in 1807, for the general instruction and civilization of the natives of Africa. The complete abolition of the infamous traffic in human beings, called the slave trade, is one of its principal objects. The Duke of Gloucester is president, with thirty-four vice presidents. Its secretary is William Empson, Esq.
  • AFRICAN PLACE, Somers Town turns off at No. 38, Wilstead Street, Somers Place East, near the New Road.
  • AGED CHRISTIAN SOCIETY, of London, for the permanent relief of the decidedly Christian poor. Office, No. 32, Sackville Street, Piccadilly; the Rev. Messrs. Ellersby and J. Blackburn, secretaries.
  • AGGAT'S PASSAGE, Houndsditch, is the first turning on the left in Cutler's Street from No. 114, Houndsditch, and leads to Devonshire Square and Bishopsgate Street.
  • St. AGNES-LE-CLAIR, Old Street Road, is an ancient spring of water dedicated to that saint, and now used as a cold bath, situated in Paul Street, Old Street Road, the continuation of Wilson Street from the north side of Finsbury Square.
  • St. AGNES CRESCENT, Old Street Road, is on the south side of that thoroughfare, and extends from Paul Street, above mentioned, to Wood Street in North Street, City Road.
  • St. AGNES PLACE, Old Street Road, is a row of houses near the above, which connect Old Street Road with Paul Street.
  • St. AGNES PLACE, Surrey, is in Great Waterloo Street, Waterloo Bridge Road, a continuation of that road from the Coburg Theatre, to the Obelisk by the Surrey Theatre.
  • St. AGNES STREET, Old Street Road, is south of and parallel to the Old Street Road, and extends from Paul Street to Wood Street, City Road.
  • St. AGNES TERRACE, Finsbury, is the continuation of Tabernacle Walk northward to Paul Street. The whole of this and the before mentioned district of St. Agnes-le-Clair was, till within the last thirty years, known by the name of St. Agnes-le-Clair Fields, Hoxton.
  • AIR STREET, Piccadilly, turns up at No. 18 on the north side of Piccadilly, and leads to No. 72 in the Regent's Quadrant. It leads also to Brewer Street and to Golden Square.
  • AIR'S ALMS HOUSES, White's Alley, Coleman Street, are in the second turning on the left above No. 61, Coleman Street.
  • ALAM YARD, Crutched Friars, is in Mark Lane, Fenchurch Street.
  • [[St. ALBAN'S Buildings, Lambeth, is in China Walk, near China Terrace, Westminster Bridge Road.
  • St. ALBAN'S CHURCH, Wood Street, Cheapside, is situated about the middle of the east side. It is an indifferent attempt at the pointed style of architecture by Sir Christopher Wren, who, it is clear by this and other of his churches in the ancient English style of Gothic architecture, had but little knowledge and feeling for this appropriate and elegant style of ecclesiastical architecture. It is dedicated to St. Alban, the Anglo protomartyr who suffered under the persecution of Diocletian, and gave his name to the ancient town and abbey of St. Alban, in Hertfordshire. The first church on this site was erected in the year 930, and dedicated to the same saint. After various repairs, the ancient church was taken down, in 1634, and another greeted, that was destroyed by the great fire of London in 1666, when the present edifice was erected after the same plan as the former. The living is a rectory, in the patronage of Eton college, and the dean and chapter of St. Paul's, alternately; and the parish of St. Olave, Silver Street, was united to it after the fire. Its present rector is the Rev, Edward J. Beckwith, one of the minor canons of St. Paul's, who was instituted in 1600. In Munday's edition of Stow are several curious epitaphs transcribed from this church, particularly the following:-

Hic jacet Tom Short-hose, Sine tombe, sine sheet, sine riches, Qui vixit sine gowne, Sine cloak, sine shirt, sine breeches.\\rdblquote

  • St. ALBANS COURT, Wood Street, Cheapside, is nearly opposite the before mentioned church.
  • St. ALBANS PLACE, Pall Mall, is a paved turning on the north side of Charles Street, Haymarket, opposite the Opera Colonnade. It leads at the back of Carlton Chambers, Regent Street, into St. Albans Street, St. James's Square.
  • St. ALBANS PLACE, Edgeware Road, is at No. 140 on the east side of that great public thoroughfare.
  • ALBANY, Mansion and Chambers, Piccadilly, formerly York House, is at No. 52 in Piccadilly, and adjoining to Burlington House. The mansion in the centre was designed by Sir William Chambers for Lord Melbourne, who exchanged it with his royal highness the late Duke of York for the present Melbourne house, adjoining the Horse Guards in Whitehall. On its being parted with by the duke, the mansion was converted into the present range of chambers, or temporary residences for the nobility and gentry, and the gardens and courtyard built upon for similar purposes. It was then named Albany, after its late royal occupier's second title.
  • ALBANY PLACE, Walworth, is in East Street, formerly East Lane, on the east side of the High Road leading from the Elephant and Castle to Camberwell.
  • ALBANY PLACE, Commercial Road, is opposite Robert Street, near the Gun Tavern.
  • ALBANY PLACE, Kent Road, is in Albany Road, which leads from the Kent Road, nearly opposite the Grange Road, Bermondsey, to Camberwell, near the large Wesleyan Chapel.
  • ALBANY STREET, Regent's Park, is on the east side of that park, on the north side of the New Road, and directly opposite to Portland Road. It leads at the back of the Colosseum and the Diorama, through Munster Street and Clarence Street, to the north eastern extremity of the park, by the Zoological Society's Gardens.
  • ALBANY STREET, LITTLE]], Regent's Park, a street parallel to the above, near its northern end, leading from William Street to Ernest Street, Clarence Market.
  • ALBANY TERRACE, Kent Road, is on the eastern side of the above described Albany Road, a short distance on the left hand from the Kent Road.
  • ALBEMARLE STREET, Clerkenwell, named after the noble owner of the soil, is about the middle of St. John Street, West Smithfield, on the left hand at No. 23, and leads westward into St. John's Square.
  • ALBEMARLE STREET, Piccadilly, is a large handsome street opposite St. James's Street, and parallel to Bond Street. It leads from Piccadilly northwards to Grafton Street, New Bond Street. The island of houses between Grafton Street and Piccadilly, was formerly the mansion and garden of the Duke of Albemarle, who purchased them of the Earl of Clarendon, whose seat it had long been. On the disposal of the property by the duke on building leases, the present houses in Albemarle Street, and those at their back in Bond Street, formerly called Albemarle Buildings, were erected. The Clarendon Hotel in New Bond Street, is on part of the property, and so named from that cause.
  • ALBERT STREET, Hoxton, is in William Street, near the Canal Road.
  • ALBION CHAPEL, Moorfields, is at the end of Fore Street, and the south east corner of London Wall. It is a neat and unassuming building, with a very pretty diastyle portico of the Ionic order in antis. It belongs to a congregation of the national church of Scotland resident in London.
  • ALBION BUILDINGS, Bartholomew Close, is a paved Court at the end of Westmoreland Buildings, Aldersgate Street.
  • ALBION COURT, Albion Court, St. George's in the East, is a turning that leads into Mary Street, and Chapel Street.
  • ALBION CLUB, is held at No. 86, St. James's Street. Its number is limited to four hundred members.
  • ALBION FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY'S OFFICE, the corner of Bridge Street and Ludgate Hill, being the end of Farringdon Street. This company was instituted in 1805, and established by act of parliament. Its affairs are managed by eighteen directors, of whom James Pattison, Esq., is Chairman and John Towgood, Esq., Deputy Chairman, and three Auditors. William Charlton, Esq., is the Secretary; John Teesdale, Esq., Solicitor; D. R. Roper, Esq., Surveyor; Dr. Bright, Physician; and Benjamin Pearce, Esq., Accountant. The office is a very handsome elevation, with Grecian Doric porticos, from the designs of Mr. Roper.
  • ALBION PLACE, Walworth or Newington Butts, is the second turning on the left, about a quarter of a mile from the Elephant and Castle, on the road towards Camberwell.
  • ALBION PLACE, East Lane, Walworth, part of the east side, a few yards on the left hand from the Kent Road, towards Walworth High Street or Road.
  • ALBION PLACE, Blackfriars' Road, is the large Square on the south side of Blackfriars' Bridge, corresponding with Chatham Place on the north. The large houses on the east side were formerly the Albion Mills that were destroyed by fire about thirty years ago. At the opposite side are the warehouses and works of the British Plate Glass Company.
  • ALBION PLACE, Lower Chapman Street, St. George's in the East, is on the south side of the road between Mary Street and Duke Street
  • ALBION STREET, St. George's in the East, is the fourth turning on the right in the Commercial Road, from Cannon Street Road, and leads to Lower Chapman Street.
  • ALBION STREET, Blackfriars' Road, is the south continuation of Albion Place, extending as far as Stamford Street. About the middle of this place is a large building formerly the Leverian Museum, and afterwards the Surrey Institution. It is now used for occasional concerts, and is called the Surrey Rotunda.
  • ALBION STREET, Rotherhithe, is a continuation eastward of Paradise Row, from Deptford Lower Road, and extends across Neptune Street.
  • ALDERMANBURY, is the continuation northward of Milk Street, Cheapside, from the corners of Cateaton Street and Lad Lane. It takes its name from having been the site of the ancient Guildhall, where the Aldermen of London held their meeting. This ancient hall is supposed to have been built by Edward the Confessor, as it was known by its present name in 1189. Stow remembers its ruins, and says it was used in his days as a carpenters shop. It has no public buildings of consequence but its church. - [see St. Mary, Aldermanbury]
  • ALDERMANBURY POSTERN, is a continuation northward of Aldermanbury, extending from London Wall to Fore Street. It is so named as being on the site of the ancient postern gate through London Wall.
  • [[ALDERMAN PARSONS' STAIRS. A public landing place on the north bank of the Thames, at Shadwell, named after a former owner. It is also called Lady Parsons' Stairs.
  • ALDERMAN'S WALK, Bishopsgate Without, is a turning on the north side the church, about a quarter of a mile on the left from Cornhill, extending behind the church into the churchyard.
  • ALDERMARY CHURCHYARD, Watling Street, is a narrow paved Street, leading to the middle of Bow Lane. It has a very capacious and handsome church by Sir Christopher Wren. - [see St. Mary, Aldermary]
  • ALDERSGATE BARS, Goswell Street, is a little beyond the north end of Aldersgate Street, and is the boundary of the liberties of the City without the walls, in that direction.
  • ALDERSGATE BUILDINGS, Aldersgate Street, is about three fifths of a mile on the right hand from Newgate Street, nearly opposite to Charter House Square.
  • ALDERSGATE CHAPEL, Glasshouse Street, is situated in the Glasshouse Liberty of St. Botolph, Aldersgate Street. This liberty, which supports its own poor, and is extra parochial, derives its name from a glass house which anciently stood there.
  • ALDERSGATE STREET, is the north continuation of St. Martin's-le-Grand, and reaches from the site of the ancient Alders Gate to the ancient Barbican. This street contains the Church of St. Botolph. - [see St. Botolph's Church] Shaftesbury House [which see], an ancient residence of the earls of that name, and built by Inigo Jones; the celebrated Albion Tavern, and the Bull and Mouth and the Three Cups Hotels. It gives name to the ward, which is governed by Alderman Sir Peter Laurie and eight common councilmen.
  • ALDERSGATE WORKHOUSE, is at the back of No. 129, Aldersgate Street, at the south east end of New Street, Cloth Fair.
  • [[ALDGATE CHURCH. - [see St. Botolph, Aldgate]
  • ALDGATE HIGH STREET, is the continuation of Leadenhall Street and Fenchurch Street, and extends eastward from the Pump to Somerset Street and Petticoat Lane. It gives its name to the ward, which is governed by an alde�???rman (Thorpe) and six common councilmen.
  • ALDGATE WARD SCHOOL, is nearly opposite the Minories, and near the corner of Aldgate Churchyard and Houndsditch. It was founded by Sir John Cass, alderman of the ward in 1710. His statue adorns the front. - [see Cass's School]
  • ALERTON or ALLERTON STREET, Hoxton, is near Walbrook Place, Hoxton New Town, about a quarter of a mile on the left from Winkworth Buildings, City Road.
  • [[ALEXANDER Buildings, Three Oak Lane, Horselydown, is the eastern continuation of Free School Street, Tooley Street.
  • ALFRED BUILDINGS, Castle Lane, Westminster, is the second turning on the right from James Street, or the west end of York Street, by the park.
  • [[ALFRED'S Buildings, Windmill Street, Finsbury Square, is a few yards on the right from the north west corner of Finsbury Square, two houses from Providence Row.
  • ALFRED COURT, Paul's Alley, Redcross Street, Cripplegate, is the first turning on the left in Paul's Alley, from the corner of Redcross Street, and leads to Aldersgate Street.
  • ALFRED MEWS, Tottenham Court Road, is nearly opposite Chapel Street, and about one third of a mile on the right from Oxford Street.
  • ALFRED PLACE, Goswell Street Road, is on the western side of the road, and commences at the end of Rawstorne Street, opposite Sydney Street, and is continued by Owen's Place, Gwyn's Buildings, to the City Road.
  • ALFRED PLACE, Kent Road, is a row of houses on the south side, about a quarter of a mile on the right, below the Bricklayer's Arms.
  • ALFRED PLACE, Bedford Square, is a handsome Street, terminated by two crescents - [see Crescent], and extending from Chenies Street to Store Street.
  • ALFRED PLACE, Blackfriars' Road, is the first turning on the east, nearly opposite Christ Church, about a furlong on the left from Blackfriars' Bridge, and parallel to the the High Road.
  • ALFRED PLACE, Newington Causeway, is the first vow of houses on the left from the Elephant and Castle towards London.
  • ALFRED PLACE, New Road, Isle of Dogs, is about a furlong south of the Limehouse entrance of the City Canal.
  • ALFRED ROW, Charles Street, Bethnal Green Road, is the second turning on the left from the road opposite Wilmot Square.
  • ALFRED SOCIETY or CLUB, is held at No. 23, Albemarle Street, Piccadilly. Its number is limited to five hundred members, it is conducted by a committee of fifteen, and its secretary is Charles Beloe, Esq.
  • ALIEN OFFICE, 18, Crown Street, Westminster, is a few doors on the right from King Street. Its chief clerk is William Hughes, Esq.
  • ALIENATION OFFICE, 2, King's Bench Walk, Inner Temple, is on the east side, a few yards on the left from the south end of Mitre Court. It is one of the offices under the Lord Chancellor, where all writs of covenants and entries upon which fines are levied and recoveries suffered, are taken to have fines for alienation �???set and paid. It is conducted by three commissioners - George Courthorpe, Esq., Sir R. Chester, and Charles Luxmore, Esq., a receiver general, a master in Chancery, and two clerks. It is open from 9 to 1, and from 3 to 5; except during the long vacation, when it is open only on Mondays and Wednesdays, from 11 to 12.
  • ALLEN'S or ALLEYN'S ALMS HOUSES, Lamb Alley, Bishopsgate Without, are a few doors on the right, from the corner of the said street, the north side of Sun Street. This charitable foundation was erected in Petty France by Edward Alleyn, a comedian, about the year 1614, and subsequently removed to its present site. - [see Dulwich College]
  • ALLEN'S BUILDINGS, Bowling Green Lane, Clerkenwell, is the first on the left from opposite the Workhouse, Coppice Row.
  • ALLEN'S BUILDINGS, Vine Yard, St. Olave's, is the second turning on the left from the east end of Tooley Street, about three eighths of a mile on the left from London Bridge.
  • ALLEN'S COURT, Oxford Street, is between Wardour Street and Chapel Street, about one eighth of a mile on the left from St. Giles's.
  • ALLEN'S COURT or RENTS, Harrow Alley, Gravel Lane, Houndsditch, is the second turning on the right from Gravel Lane, towards the middle of Petticoat Lane.
  • ALLEN STREET, Clerkenwell, is about one sixth of a mile upon the west side of Goswell Street, and leads into St. John Street.
  • ALLEY'S ALMS HOUSES, Great St. Anne's Lane, Westminster, are about ten doors on the right from Great Peter Street, at the back of the Woolstaplers' Alms Houses.
  • ALLHALLOWS, Barking, the Church of, is situated at the east end of Tower Street, and the corner of Seething Lane. It receives its name as having been dedicated to all the Saints, formerly called All Hallows, and from being before the Reformation a vicarage in the gift of the Abbess and Convent of Barking, in Essex. But on the dissolution of the monasteries the advowson was given to the Archbishop of Canterbury. It escaped the fire in 1666, and is of considerable extent, being one hundred and eighty feet long, sixty seven broad and thirty five high; it has a plain bell tower, with a well proportioned turret, about eighty feet in height from the ground. This church is of considerable antiquity, as appears from the circumstance of Richard the First having founded and endowed a chapel within its walls. Its present vicar is the Rev. S. J. Knight, who was instituted in 1783.
  • ALLHALLOWS, Bread Street, the Church of, is situated at the corner of Bread Street and Watling Street, and takes its name from the same dedication as the last, and its situation, which is near to the ancient Bread Market of the city. It was originally a rectory of very ancient foundation, under the patronage of the Prior and Canons of Christ Church, Canterbury, but since the reformation it was conveyed to the Archbishops of Canterbury, of which see, it is one of the thirteen peculiars within the city. The old church was destroyed by the great fire in 1666 and the present edifice was erected from the designs of Sir Christopher Wren, as a church for the united parishes of St. Allhallows, Bread Street, and St. John the Evangelist, the old church of which stood at the north east corner of Friday Street and Watling Street. The body of the church is plain, with dressings of the Tuscan order. It is seventy two feet in length, thirty five in breadth and thirty in height. It is an excellent specimen of the talents of Sir Christopher Wren in substantial and useful church building. Its present rector is the Rev. G. T. Andrewes, one of the six preachers at Canterbury, who was instituted in 1819. �???
  • ALLHALLOWS, THE GREAT]], the Church of, is situated at the north east corner of Allhallows Lane, on the south side of Upper Thames Street, nearly opposite the lower end of Bush Lane, Cannon Street. It derives its name from its dedication to all the saints or hallows, and its epithets, to distinguish it from an adjoining church of the same name, which was called the less. It is also in ancient books called the more, or the greater, and, ad F\\'9cnum, in the ropery, from its vicinity to some rope walks. This church was founded by the ancestors of the Despencer family, from whom it passed to the crown, till in 1546 Henry the Eighth gave it to Thomas, Archbishop of Canterbury, in whose successors it has remained to the present day. It is a rectory, and one of the thirteen peculiars in London, belonging to the archiepiscopal see of Canterbury. After the fire of London, the parish of Allhallows the Less, originally called Allhallows, super cellarium, from being built on arched vaults or cellars, was united to Allhallows the Great, and the present church, built from the designs of Sir Christopher Wren, erected for the use of both parishes. Its present rector is the Rev. Wm. St. Andrew Vincent, a prebendary of Chichester, who was instituted in 1788.

The interior of this church is of the Tuscan order, is eighty seven feet long, sixty feet broad and thirty three feet high, built of brick and stone in a strong and solid manner. The tower is plain, square, and divided into five stories, and having neither spire, turret or pinnacles, has the appearance of being unfinished, which is very likely to be the case, as Sir Christopher Wren was too good a master of his art to erect such a foundation to carry nothing. Among the funereal monuments that were in the ancient church of Allhallows the Great, and that were destroyed by the great fire, was one of too interesting a nature to be omitted, even in a work like the present, where \\ldblquote brevity is the soul\\rdblquote of its excellence, if not of its wit. It was one erected, probably by the parish, to the memory of our illustrious if not amiable Queen Elizabeth, to whom may very properly be applied the epitaph of the Empress Maria Theresa of Austria.

  • [[Sexa f\\'9cmina, ingenio vir. (Woman by sex, and man by mind.)

The inscriptions on the monument in question ran as follows:

If royal virtues ever crown'd a crown; If ever mildness shin'd in majesty; If ever honour honour'd true renown; If ever courage dwelt with clemency; If ever princess put all princes down; For temperance, prowess prudence, equity; This, this was she, that in despite of death Lives still admir'd, ador'd Elizabeth.

Many daughters have done virtuously, but thou excellest them all.

On the representation of a book above her bust is the following:

They that trust in the Lord shall be as Mount Sion, which shall not be removed.\\rdblquote

On the right side of the monument,

  • [[Spain's rod, Rome's ruin, the Netherland's relief. Heaven's gem, earth's joy, world's wonder, nation's chief.

On the left side,

Britain's blessing, England's splendour. Religion's nurse, and Faith's defender.\\rdblquote

  • [[And beneath,

I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course. Queen Elizabeth died the 24th March, 1602.

  • ALLHALLOWS, Honey Lane, a small churchyard, upon which stood, before the fire of London, the small church of the above name. Being a very small parish it was united by act of parliament to that of St. Mary-le-Bow in Cheapside. It is a rectory, the advowson of which is in the Grocer's Company, which since its union with the above named parish, and that of St. Pancras, Soper Lane, present alternately with the Archbishop of Canterbury. Honey Lane Market, small as it is, occupies the site of two ancient parish churches; the one at the head of this article, and that of St. Mary Magdalen, Milk Street, which was also destroyed by the great fire in 1666. - [see St. Mary-le-Bow]
  • ALLHALLOWS, THE LESS]], stood on the south side of Thames Street, almost adjoining to that of Allhallows the Great; but having suffered in the common calamity in 1666, the parish was united to that of Allhallows the Great. - [which see]
  • ALLHALLOWS, Lombard Street, the Church of, is situate in Bell Alley, near the north corner of Lombard Street, in the ward of Langbourn. A church stood here dedicated to the same patrons before the year 1053. It is a rectory, and one of the thirteen peculiars within the city, appertaining, to the see of Canterbury. The advowson appears to have been anciently in lay hands, as Brithmer, a wealthy citizen, with the approbation of Archbishop Stigand and Dean Goderic, gave it with a messuage adjoining to the cathedral church of Canterbury in the year 1603; by virtue of which donative it still remains in the gift of the dean and chapter of the Metropolitan Church. The present rector is the Rev. Walter Brown, a prebendary of Canterbury, who was instituted in 1810. It is a neat, plain, and like all Sir Christopher Wren's churches, a well proportioned edifice. The body is eighty four feet in length, fifty two in breadth and thirty in height.
  • ALLHALLOWS, London Wall, the Church of, stands a little westward of Broad Street in London Wall, whence it derives its second name. It is a rectory, the patronage of which was anciently in the prior and convent of the Holy Trinity, near Aldgate, who in 1335 presented it to Thomas Richer de Sanston. At the dissolution of religious houses in the reign of Henry VIII., this church, with the priory to which it belonged, was surrendered to the crown, in whose gift the advowson still remains. Its present rector is the Rev. Robert Nares, a canon residentiary of Litchfield, archdeacon of Stafford, and a prebendary of St. Paul's. He was instituted in 1817. It escaped the fire in 1666, but became latterly so ruinous that in 1765 the parishioners obtained an act of parliament to pull it down and rebuild it; which they did from the designs of the elder Mr. Dance, the (then) city architect, who also built the churches of Shoreditch and Bishopsgate. It is a plain substantial church, of brick and stone, with a well proportioned stone tower and cupola.
  • ALLHALLOWS STAINING, the Church of, is situated near the eastern extremity of Langbourn Ward, on the west side, and near to the north end of Mark Lane, within four houses of Fenchurch Street. It is believed to be of Saxon origin from its cognomen Stane, corruptly Staining, the Saxon word for stone, probably to distinguish it from some other that was of wood. It is mentioned as early as 1329, when Edward Camel was its incumbent. It was anciently a rectory, under the patronage of the De Walthams, till 1365, when Simon, Bishop of London, presented it to the abbot and convent of De Grace, near the Tower. At the reformation it devolved to the crown, and was afterwards sold by James I. to George Bingley and others in soccage.\\'86 It came afterwards into the possession of Lady Slany, who bequeathed it to the Grocer's Company, who still hold the advowson, but it is not in charge.

[\\'86A servile tenure of inferior or husbandry services to be performed for the fee, below that of knight's service.]

  • ALLHALLOWS STAINING SCHOOL, near the above named church, was founded in 1669 by Mr. William Winter, who endowed it with \\'a31,000.
  • ALLHALLOWS LANE, Upper Thames Street, is near the steel yard, by the side of the Church of Allhallows the Great, nearly opposite the lower end of Bush Lane, Cannon Street.
  • ALLHALLOWS PASSAGE, Gracechurch Street, is a turning about six houses northward of Lombard Street.
  • ALLHALLOWS STAIRS, a public landing place on the north bank of the Thames, at the bottom of Allhallows Lane above mentioned.
  • [[ALLIANCE BRITISH AND FOREIGN LIFE AND FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. The offices of this company are at No. 8, Pall Mall, and at the north west corner of Capel Court, Bartholomew Lane, opposite the east front of the Bank of England. It is under the management of five presidents and fifteen directors. Its managing officers are Benjamin Gompertz, Esq., Actuary; Andrew Hamilton, Secretary; and Dr. Hume, Physician,
  • ALLOWANCE OFFICE FOR SPOILED STAMPS, is at the Stamp office, in the south east corner of the great quadrangle of Somerset Place, in the Strand. It is open for the receipt of spoiled stamps, on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12 to 2. Its officers are Charles Crokat, Esq., examiner, and Messrs. Walter Twyford, Alfred R. Adrian, and George Warburton, clerks - Where a deed has been executed, and is then, from any circumstance, rendered useless, and another, deed executed in lieu thereof, upon applying for the allowance of the stamps upon such deed, it is necessary to produce the last executed deed for the inspection of the commissioners of stamps, before any allowance will be granted for the stamp or stamps for which the allowance is claimed - No allowance can be obtained for any stamps spoiled or rendered useless, unless they are delivered to the examiner of spoiled stamps at the Allowance Office, within six calendar months after the same shall have been spoiled, if the parties to whom they belong reside in London, or within ten miles. Where they belong to parties not residing in London, nor within ten miles, twelve months is allowed. Where deeds have been sent abroad and rendered useless by any circumstance, the time for recovering the allowance is six months from the time when they were received back. Other more particular information can be obtained by inquiry at the office, where proper forms of application may be seen.
  • [[ALMACK'S Assembly Rooms, so called after the original proprietor, and often called Willis's Rooms, after the name of the present proprietor, is an extensive building, where balls, concerts, public meetings &c. are held. It is situate on the south side of King Street, St. James's, about midway between St. James's Square and Street, opposite Duke Street. In these rooms, the meetings of the exclusive and fashionable assembly called Almacks, under the direction of a committee of ladies of the highest rank, are held; as also an ancient and fashionable society called the Caledonians, and other fashionable and respectable assemblies.
  • ALMONRY, THE GREAT]], Westminster, so named as being anciently the place where the alms of Westminster Abbey were distributed, is the first turning on the south in Dean Street, parallel to Tothill Street, and communicating with it by Wright's Passage.
  • ALMONRY, THE LITTLE]], is the continuation of the preceding, Crossing Dean Street, and leading to Dean's Yard by the Abbey. On the site of the Almonry, vulgarly called the Ambry, stood originally a chapel dedicated to St. Catherine, �???or, as Stowe says, to St. Anne. Near this place Abbot Islip, whose chapel is among the greatest beauties in the adjoining Abbey, erected, in 1474, the first printing, office that was ever established in England, when the celebrated William Caxton, a citizen and mercer of London, brought that invaluable art from Holland, and became earliest printer in England.
  • ALMONRY OFFICE, THE]], is situated in Middle Scotland Yard, Whitehall, and belongs to the department of the Lord High Steward, which office is at present held by the Marquess of Conyngham. It is under the immediate management of the Archbishop of York, the present Lord High Almoner; the Rev. Dr. Goodenough, Sub Almoner; the Marquess of Exeter, Hereditary Grand Almoner; Joseph Hanby, Esq., Secretary to the Lord High Almoner, a yeoman, and a groom of the Almonry. These officers have the distribution of the King's alms, a public celebration of which takes place every Maunday Monday; besides which other and less ostentatious bounties are bestowed to aged, poor, and deserving persons.
  • ALMONRY YARD, Westminster, is a turning in the middle of the south side of the before described Great Almonry.
  • [[ALMS HOUSES. For accounts of these, the reader is referred to the several articles under the title of their respective founders.
  • ALPHA COTTAGES, Regent's Park, a series of respectable dwellings on the western side of the said park, which derive their name from the circumstance of a builder of some taste taking the first piece of ground that was to be let, and building thereon a cottage for the residence of himself and family. An imitator followed, and, as imitators from the time of Horace were always \\ldblquote a servile herd,\\rdblquote forgot when his predecessor had said A]], that he ought to have said B]], and have called his imitation Beta Cottage, but multiplying first letters, named the whole concern, cottages, streets and roads, Alpha Cottages!
  • ALPHA ROAD, Regent's Park, is about one third of a mile up Lisson grove, nearly opposite the Yorkshire Stingo, in the New Road, leading from Tottenham Court Road to Paddington.
  • ALPHABET COURT, Brown's Buildings, Clare Market, is a small court, named from an adjacent sign, that leads from Stanhope Street to Nag's Head Court.
  • St. ALPHAGE, the Church of, is situated in Aldermanbury and London Wall, having an entrance from each. It derives its name from St. Alphage or Elphage, a noble Saxon saint, and Archbishop of Canterbury, who was murdered at Greenwich by the Danes, in the year 1013. The former church, which was a small and mean edifice, escaped the flames in 1666 but has been recently rebuilt from the designs of the younger Mr. George Dance. It has the singularity of having elliptical columns instead of circular, where, being attached to the wall in a very narrow street, great projection could not be obtained, and consequently produce a better effect of light and shade from the depth of the undercutting; than either pilasters or half columns. The living is a rectory in the patronage of the Bishop of London, and its present rector is the Rev. Robert Watts, one of the prebendaries of St. Paul's, who was instituted in 1799.
  • ALSOP'S BUILDINGS, New Road, Mary-le-bone, is a row of well built, lofty houses on the north side of the New Road, that leads from Tottenham Court Road to Paddington, and nearly opposite the northern end of Baker Street, Portman Square.
  • ALSOP'S MEWS, New Road, Mary-le-bone, is the first turning north parallel to part of Alsop's Buildings, and extending from Baker Street North, to Upper Gloucester Street, Portman Square.
  • [[ALSOP'S�??? PLACE]], New Road, Mary-le-bone, is situate on the north side of Alsop's Buildings, and extends from Pleasant Row to Baker Street, North.
  • ALSCOT PLACE, Grange Road, Bermondsey, is part of the south side, about a furlong on the right from Bermondsey New Road, and a few yards east from Page's Walk.
  • AMBASSADOR'S, French, Office for Passports, is in Weymouth Street, at the back of the ambassador's official residence, No. 50, Portland Place. The present ambassador is the Duke de Laval Montmorency, who resides in Piccadilly, and M. Roth is his secretary, with the Viscount de Flavigny and M. Billing as under-secretaries.
  • AMELIA ROW, Borough Road, St. George's Fields, is on the south side of the road facing the King's Bench Prison. It is continued by Earl Street to the London Road, opposite the Philanthropic Society's schools.
  • AMELIA STREET, Walworth, is about one third of a mile on the right from the Elephant and Castle on the High Road to Camberwell; the south end of it is now called Penton Street.
  • AMEN CORNER, Ave Maria Lane, is the first turning on the left up Ave Maria Lane from Ludgate Street, and leads to Stationers' Alley, and the residentiaries' houses of St. Paul's Cathedral.
  • AMERICA PLACE, Southwark, the first turning on the east parallel to part of Great Guildford Street. There is an entrance to it in Queen Street, and it leads to Orton's Buildings and Castle Street.
  • AMERICA MEWS, Minories, is behind the south side of America Square.
  • AMERICA SQUARE, Minories, is the middle of the west side, the fourth turning on the right down Crutched Friars from Mark Lane.
  • AMERICA STREET, Great Guildford Street, Southwark, is the first on the right, and five or six houses from Queen Street, leading to America Place.
  • AMERICAN INDIAN CIVILIZATION SOCIETY, an institution established by the Society of Friends; was established in 1795, and has been carried on with their progressive assiduity and persevering steadiness, so as to have considerably influenced the northern tribes of American Indiana to adopt the arts of cultivation. Their meetings are held at Messrs. Darton's booksellers, in Gracechurch Street.
  • AMICABLE ROW, Kent Street, is a turning off at No. 44, Newcastle Street, in that road.
  • AMICABLE SOCIETY, for a perpetual life assurance office, at their house. No. 13, Serjeants Inn, Fleet Street, nearly opposite Fetter Lane. This ancient and honourable society was incorporated by a royal charter granted by Queen Anne, and enlarged and otherwise improved by a second, granted in the 48th year of George III., and again by another charter granted the 12th February, 1823 Queen Anne's charter limited the number of members to 2,000; the second allowed the society to increase their numbers to 8,000; and the third charter to 16,000. The society is empowered to make a provision for their wives, children and other relations, after an easy, certain and advantageous manner, with power to purchase lands, &c, to have a seal, which is a dove standing upon a serpent, surrounded by a scroll, in the upper part of which is their motto, \\ldblquote Prudens simplicitas.\\rdblquote The business of this corporation is conducted by twelve directors, six auditors, and a registrar, John Pensam, Esq., who is also receiver and accomptant, of whom every particular relative to the society may be obtained. Attendance is given at the office as above fro�???m 9 o'clock till 3.
  • AMPHITHEATRE, ASTLEY'S]], Royal, is situated on the Surrey side of Westminster Bridge, on the right hand side of the High Road, about fourteen houses from the bridge foot. Its season commences on Easter Monday and terminates in November. Its leading attractions are the inimitable performances of graceful and daring horsemanship of Ducrow, the principal proprietor, his beautiful stud of Horses, and a series of popular burlettas and descriptive dramas, principally of celebrated battles. It was originally established by the eccentric Philip Astley, who was a dragoon and served under the late Duke of York, whose patronage he enjoyed till his death.
  • AMPHITHEATRE ROW, Westminster Bridge Road, is a row of houses named after the preceding, which extends from Astley's Theatre to Stangate, on the south bank of the Thames.
  • AMPTON STREET, Gray's Inn Lane, turns off at No. 7, Calthorpe Place, Gray's Inn Road.
  • AMWELL STREET, Pentonville, is near to the New River Head, in St. John's Street Road, and named from the village of Amwell, where that aqueduct takes its rise.
  • ANCHOR ALLEY, Old Street, St. Luke's, is on the north side of that street, the first turning westward from the church, and formerly called Horse Shoe Alley.
  • AMYAS'S ALMS HOUSES, erected and founded in 1655, by Mrs. Susannah Amyas, for eight poor persons, male or female, is in George Yard, near the north end of Old Street, City Road.
  • ANCHOR AND HOPE ALLEY, St. George's in the East, is the continuation of Red Lion Street from Wapping, a little below the church on the left, near the place formerly called Green Bank.
  • ANCHOR STREET, Shoreditch, or Bethnal Green, extends from the back of the Swan public house, in Shoreditch, to Club Row, and is continued by Slaughter or Sclater Street to about one sixth of the way up Brick Lane, from Church Street, Bethnal Green.
  • ANCHOR STREET, LITTLE]], Bethnal Green, parallel to and between Anchor Street and Church Street.
  • ANCHOR STREET or LANE, Mile End, is on the west side of Charrington's Brewery, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand side, eastward from the turnpike gate, opposite Stepney Green.
  • ANCHOR STREET, Stepney, is in Catherine Street, a new street in the East India Dock Road, nearly opposite Poplar Church.
  • ANCHOR STREET, Spitalfields, is in Club Row, at the north end of Wheeler Street, Spitalfields.
  • ANCHOR WHARF, Bermondsey Way, is a few yards to the west of Fountain Stairs.
  • ANCHOR WHARF, Upper Thames Street, is on the south side of that street, nearly opposite the lower end of Addle Hill, Doctors' Commons.
  • ANDERSON'S BUILDINGS, City Road, part of the north side thereof by the turnpike, a little more than three quarters of a mile on the right from Finsbury Square, nearly one third of a mile south of the Angel Inn, Islington, and nearly opposite to the Orphans School.
  • ANDERSON'S BUILDINGS, Grange Road, Bermondsey, form part of the north side, about a furlong on the left hand side from Bermondsey New Road, nearly opposite Page's Walk (by some called the Terrace).
  • ANDERSON'S COURT, Queen Street, Borough, near Union Street, and opposite Whitecross Street.
  • ANDERSON'S WALK, Vauxhall Walk, is the first turning on the right from Lambeth Butts, towards Vauxhall Gardens. It leads into Princes Street, by the side of the Thames.
  • ANDERSON'S YARD, Chelsea, is a narrow passage leading from Royal Hospital Row to Turk's Road, and is situate between James Yard and Castle Yard.
  • St. ANDREW'S, Holborn, the Church of, stands at the north east corner of Holborn Hill and Shoe Lane, and is dedicated to St. Andrew the Apostle, who is distinguished in church history as the earliest of the apostles, and as having suffered martyrdom in Achaia. There was a church on this site as early as the year 1297, which escaped the fire of London in 1666, but ten years after, being found too ruinous for reparation, it was taken down, except the tower, in 1686, and the present church erected in its place by Sir Christopher Wren. It is one of the finest and most appropriate Protestant churches in Europe. Its exterior is plain, simple and unpretending; consisting of a basement under the galleries, with low windows which light the aisles, and an upper story of semicircular headed windows for the galleries and nave; crowned by a well proportioned cornice, blocking course and balustrade. The tower, which is the ancient one, newly faced with Portland stone ashlering in 1704, is square, and has no pretensions either to beauty or to taste; the interior is spacious, rich and beautiful, consisting of a nave and two aisles, divided in height into a ground story and galleries. It is one hundred and five feet long, sixty three feet broad and forty three feet high. - The living is a rectory worth above \\'a3600 a year. The patronage was originally in the gift of the Dean and Canons of St. Paul's, who transferred it to the Abbot and Convent of Bermondsey, who continued to be its patrons till their dissolution by Henry VIII., when that monarch granted it to Thomas, Lord Wriothesley, afterwards Earl of Southampton, from whom it descended, by marriage, to the late Duke of Montague. It is now in the patronage of the Duke of Buccleugh, and its present rector is the Rev. Gilbert Beresford, who was instituted in 1819.
  • St. ANDREW'S, HOLBORN]], and St. GEORGE THE MARTYR'S]], PAROCHIAL VISITING SOCIETY]], Office of the, Vestry Room, St. Andrew's Church, 1829.
  • St. ANDREW'S COURT, Holborn Hill, is about twenty houses on the left from Farringdon Street, and five houses westward of the church, whence it takes its name.
  • St. ANDREW'S COURT, Whitefriars, is part of Ashentree Court, Temple Street, at the south end of Bouverie Street, Fleet Street.
  • St. ANDREW'S HILL, Blackfriars, extends from the east end of Earl Street, or the west end of Upper Thames Street, to Great Carter Lane.
  • St. ANDREW'S CHARITY SCHOOL, Hatton Garden, Holborn, is situated at the corner of Cross Street, and is, as its name infers, the parochial school of St. Andrew's, Holborn, wherein eighty boys and seventy girls are clothed, and educated in the principles of the established Church of England.
  • St. ANDREW HUBBARD, the Churchyard of, is between Botolph Lane and Love Lane, in Little Eastcheap. The ancient church, which was destroyed at the fire of London, stood where the Weigh-house now stands, but was united to the parish of St. Mary-at-Hill.
  • St. ANDREW'S STREET, Seven Dials, is the first coach turning on the left in Broad Street, St. Giles's, leading from Drury Lane to the Seven Dials.
  • St. ANDREW'S STREET, LITTLE]], is the continuation of St. Andrew's Street, leading from the Seven Dials�??? to St. Martin's Lane, or the western end of Long Acre.
  • St. ANDREW'S, HOLBORN]], WORKHOUSE]], is in Shoe Lane, a few yards on the left hand from Holborn Hill, with another entrance from Farringdon Street.
  • St. ANDREW'S, HOLBORN]], and St. GEORGE THE MARTYR'S WORKHOUSE]], is on the left in Little Gray's Inn Lane, towards Mount Pleasant and Cold Bath Fields, at the back of Gray's Inn Lane, a quarter of a mile from Holborn.
  • St. ANDREW, Undershaft, the Church of, is situated at the south east corner of the street called St. Mary Axe and Leadenhall Street. There was a church on this site dedicated to the same saint as early as the year 1362, which was pulled down in 1532, and the present church erected in its room, at the expense of William FitzWilliams, who was sheriff in 1507. It derived its name of Undershaft from a very lofty May-pole, anciently called a shaft, which was annually raised in the street near to it on May day, and was higher than the steeple. The church is a plain Gothic structure with a well lighted body, and a square tower, with pinnacles at the angles, and a campanile with six bells within them. It is a rectory, in the gift of the Bishop of London, and is celebrated as containing the monument raised in memory of the faithful and able historiographer of the day, John Stow, who died on the 5th April, 1605, and, to the disgrace of his contemporaries, in great poverty. Its present rector is the Rev. Wm. Antrobus, who was instituted in 1794.
  • St. ANDREW NEAR THE WARDROBE, the Church of, stands on the east side of St. Andrew's Hill, near to the public wharf called Puddle Dock. It was formerly called St. Andrew juxta Baynard Castle, from its vicinity to that palace; but on the removal of the office of the King's Wardrobe to a spot now called Wardrobe Place, it received its present addition to its name. This church is supposed to have been founded about the same time as Baynard's Castle was built, and, perhaps, by the same nobleman, as the advowson was anciently in the family of Fitzwalter, from which it passed through many hands, till the year 1663, when it devolved to the crown, in whose gift it still remains. But the parish of St. Anne, Blackfriars, having been united to it after the fire of London, the rightful presentation is alternately with the crown and the parishioners. The present rector is the Rev. Isaac Saunders, who was elected by the parishioners in 1816. The present church was built in 1670, after the great fire, by Sir Christopher Wren, in a plain, substantial and useful manner, of brick and stone. The interior is sevens five feet in length, fifty nine in breadth, and thirty eight in height.
  • ANGEL ALLEY, Long Acre, is at the west end of that thoroughfare, near St. Martin's Lane, and leads into Rose Court, to King Street, Covent Garden, and to Covent Garden.
  • ANGEL ALLEY, Aldersgate Street, is the first turning south from Jewin Street, and about a quarter of a mile on the right from the corner of Newgate Street along St. Martin's-le-Grand.
  • ANGEL ALLEY, Angel Square, Bishopsgate Street Without, is about six doors north of Sun Street, and leads to Long Alley, and by Angel Passage to Skinner Street, Bishopsgate Street.
  • ANGEL ALLEY, Little Moorfields, is the third turning on the left from Fore Street, and leads to Hartshorn Alley and Moor Lane.
  • ANGEL ALLEY, Ratcliffe Highway, is opposite St. George's Church, and leads to Pennington Street.
  • ANGEL ALLEY, Wh�???itechapel, is near the church, the first turning west, and parallel to Osborne Street, leading into Wentworth Street.
  • ANGEL ALLEY, High Street, Borough, is near St. George's Church, being the continuation of Angel Court, and leads to Collin's Rents and White Street.
  • ANGEL COURT, Prince's Street, Westminster, by St. James's Park, leading into Bow Street.
  • ANGEL COURT, King Street, St. James's Square, is the second on the right from St. James's Street.
  • ANGEL COURT, Strand, opposite Somerset House, is continued by Eagle Court to White Hart Yard, Drury Lane.
  • ANGEL COURT, Strand, is by Surrey Street, about a quarter of a mile on the left from Temple Bar.
  • ANGEL COURT, Charing Cross, is six doors on the left from the Strand towards Westminster Bridge, and formerly called Johnson's Court.
  • ANGEL COURT, Great Windmill Street, Haymarket, is the first turning on the left from Piccadilly.
  • ANGEL COURT, Angell Street, St. Martin's-le-Grand, is the first turning on the left in Angel Street from St. Martin's-le-Grand.
  • ANGEL COURT, Golden Lane, Cripplegate, is the first on the right, north from Brackley Street, about six houses from Vine Street.
  • ANGEL COURT, Milton Street, formerly Grub Street, is about the middle of the east side, nearly opposite Star Court.
  • ANGEL COURT, Friday Street, is the second turning on the right hand and six doors from Cheapside.
  • [[ANGEL COURT) Snow Hill, is the first turning on the left hand from Newgate Street towards Farringdon Street, and is opposite to St. Sepulchre's Church.
  • ANGEL COURT, Throgmorton Street, is three doors on the left hand from Bartholomew Lane, by the Bank, and leads to Bell Alley and Moorfields.
  • ANGEL COURT, Red Lion Street, Spitalfields, is on the west side of Spitalfields Church, nearly opposite Dorset Street.
  • ANGEL COURT, Leadenhall Street, is about ten houses on the left hand from Aldgate.
  • ANGEL COURT, White's Yard, Rosemary Lane, is about six houses on the right hand from Rosemary Lane.
  • ANGEL COURT, Back Lane, Shadwell, is four doors east on the right from Blue Gate Fields, by the Angel public house.
  • ANGEL COURT, Shadwell High Street, is nine doors east from Blue Gate Fields, and seven houses westward from Union Street, in the opposite direction.
  • ANGEL COURT, Stoney Lane, Gravel Lane, Houndsditch, is the second turning on the left hand from Gravel Lane.
  • ANGEL COURT, High Street, Borough, is near St. Margaret's Hill, and leads to Redcross Street.
  • ANGEL COURT, High Street, Borough, near St. George's Church, is continued by Angel Alley, and leads to Collin's Rents and White Street.
  • ANGEL COURT, Borough Market, is the second turning on the right hand in York Street from High Street, about a furlong on the right hand from London Bridge.
  • ANGEL COURT, Walworth, is about a third of a mile on the right hand from the Elephant and Castle, on the road to Camberwell, the first turning westward from Amelia Street, and at the east end of the terra�???ce.
  • ANGEL GARDENS, Back Lane, Shadwell, are eight houses eastward on the right from Blue Gate Fields, by the Angel public house, about a quarter of a mile eastward of Cannon Street turnpike.
  • ANGEL INN, St. Clement's, Strand, is on the north side of the church, a few doors on the right hand from Temple Bar.
  • ANGEL INN, Broad Street, St. Giles's, is adjoining the church on the east side, four doors westward of Compton Street.
  • ANGEL INN, Angel Street, St. Martin's-le-Grand, is thirteen houses from Newgate Street in Butcher Hall Lane.
  • ANGEL INN, Farringdon Street, is on the west side, about eight or nine doors on the right hand from Holborn Bridge.
  • ANGEL INN, Islington, is at the intersection of the roads where the City Road, Pentonville High Street, and St. John's Street Road meet.
  • ANGEL INN, Blackman Street, Borough, is about seventeen houses on the left from the King's Bench Prison.
  • ANGEL LIVERY STABLES, Earl Street, Blackfriars, are three doors on the left from Bridge Street, Blackfriars.
  • ANGEL PASSAGE, Upper Thames Street, is opposite Duck's Foot, or Duxford Lane, about twenty-four houses on the left hand from London Bridge, and leads to Dyer's Hall Wharf.
  • ANGEL PASSAGE, Skinner Street, Bishopsgate, is the second turning on the left hand from Bishopsgate Without, and leads to Long Alley, Moorfields.
  • ANGEL PLACE, Broadwall, Christ Church, is the middle of the east side, near Hatfield Street, and about one sixth of a mile on the right hand from the New Cut, or Lambeth Marsh.
  • ANGEL ROW, Islington, is the row of new houses by the side of the Angel Inn, in the New Road, which leads to Pentonville and Somers Town.
  • ANGEL STREET, St. Martin's-le-Grand, is the first turning on the left from Newgate Street, and leads to the Angel Inn and Butcher Hall Lane.
  • ANGEL STREET, Broadwall, Christ Church, is part of the south end of it, and the second turning on the right hand in Lambeth Marsh, from Surrey Chapel, towards Westminster Bridge.
  • ANGEL YARD, Piccadilly, is about thirty four houses on the right hand from the Haymarket.
  • St. ANN'S and St. AGNES, Aldersgate, the Church of, is on the north side of St. Ann's Lane, at the northern extremity of the new Post Office in St. Martin's-le-Grand, and receives its name from being dedicated to St. Ann, the mother of the Virgin Mary, and its addition from its situation as being formerly just within the ancient Aldersgate. It was formerly designated St. Ann in the Willows, from the number of trees of that species which grew in that neighbourhood. The foundation of this church is very ancient, and mention is made of it as so in 1322. It is a rectory, and the patronage was formerly in the dean and canons of the conventual church of St. Martin's-le-Grand, until that corporation was annexed to the abbey of Westminster; when the abbot and convent, and after them the bishop of Westminster, became patrons. On the suppression of the bishopric of Westminster by Queen Mary, she gave it to the Bishop of London and his successors, in whom it still remains, alternately, with the dean and chapter of St. Paul's. The present rector is the Rev. John Hutchins, who was presented by the Bishop of London in 1796. The old church was destroyed by the fire of London, and the present church was erected on its si�???te by Sir Christopher Wren in 1680, and the parish of St. John Zacchary united to it The interior is fifty three feet square, and thirty, five high, and is subdivided into a smaller square in the centre by four handsome Corinthian columns, which support an ornamented ceiling. At the four angles the ceiling is lower, and is divided into square sunk panels, within each of which is a circle enriched in its circumference by fretwork.
  • St. ANN'S SOCIETY SCHOOLS, are situated one in St. Ann's Lane, opposite the northern end of the new Post Office, and one on the eastern side of the road leading from Brixton to Streatham. They originated in 1709, with some well disposed persons in the parish of the before mentioned St. Ann, who raised subscriptions and contributions for the establishing of these schools. The asylum at Brixton Hill is a very spacious and handsome building, erected in 1829, on a most salubrious site, from the designs of John Henry Taylor, Esq., F.S.A., an architect of much taste and knowledge. For nearly a century this society only afforded a day school in London, for educating and clothing thirty boys and thirty girls, not chosen indiscriminately from any parish, nor even confined to the metropolis, but open to necessitous legitimate children of every condition, whether orphans or not, and more especially to children of persons who have seen better days, but from unforeseen casualties have been compelled to seek its assistance. The new asylum at Brixton Hill is calculated for the reception of one hundred boys and fifty girls, and is a handsome substantial building, with an Ionic portico in the centre, and two wings raised on a handsome rusticated ground story. The Duke of Sussex is patron; William Wilberforce, Esq., president. There are also thirty vice presidents, three house stewards, and a committee of management, changed every year. Mr. Thomas Jones, of No. 20, King's Arms Yard, Coleman Street, is the secretary, by whom all communications will be received, and inquiries answered.
  • St. ANN'S, Soho, the Church of, is situated on the south of Dean Street, Soho, near the lower end towards Gerard Street; and the churchyard reaches from Dean Street on the east to Princes Street on the west This church and parish owe their origin to the same cause as the last named, and was separated from the overgrown parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields by an act of parliament, passed in the year 1661, the provisions of which were however not completed till 1678, and the present church was finished in 1686, on a spot formerly called Kemp's Fields. It is dedicated to St. Anne, in compliment to the Princess Anne of Denmark, afterwards Queen Anne. The advowson is in the gift of the Bishop of London, and the present rector is the Rev. R. M'Leod, D.D., who was instituted in 1806. The walls of this church are of brick, with rusticated angles of Portland stone. At the east end is a large modillion cornice and triangular pediment. It was repaired by the late S. P. Cockerell, Esq., about twenty-five years since, and the tower and spire taken down and rebuilt. The original organ was presented to the church by William III., and at the time of the above repair, was removed into the Church of St. Michael, Royal College Hill, and entirely repaired by the late Mr. Gray, under the superintendence of the father of the editor of this work, and a very fine new one erected in its stead, by that able organ builder Mr. John Gray, sen. A very handsome painted window was also added to the east end at the same time. The interior, since Mr. Cockerell's repairs, is very handsome. The roof is divided into panels, and supported by columns of the Ionic order, and the gallery by columns of the Tuscan order in spite of the ridicule that some hypercritics of a quarter of a century ago attempted to affix to the new tower and spire, it is, with the exception of the clock, a very original, chaste and classical design; but its originality, like the compositi�???ons of Vanburgh and Hawksmoor, were stumbling blocks to the pedants, and foolishness to the (self called) critics. Among the monuments appertaining to this church is one that deserves particular attention. It is a tablet erected to the memory of Theodore Anthony Neuhoff, King of Corsica, who died in this parish in the year 1756, soon after his liberation from the King's Bench Prison by an act of insolvency. The friend who gave shelter to this unfortunate monarch, whom nobles could praise when praise could not reach his ear, and who refused to succour him in his living miseries, was himself so poor as to be unable to defray the cost of his funeral. His remains were therefore about to be consigned to the grave as a parish pauper, when a benignant spirit in the person of John Wright, an oilman in Compton Street, declared that he for once would pay the funeral expenses of a king, which he did. The marble was erected, and the following epitaph, written by Horace Walpole, inscribed upon it:-

The grave, great teacher, to a level brings Heroes and beggars, galley-slaves and Kings. But THEODORE this moral learn'd ere dead. Fate pour'd its lesson on his living head, Bestow'd a Kingdom, and denied him bread.\\rdblquote

  • St. ANN'S COURT, St. Ann's Street, Westminster, is the first turning on the right hand, a few doors from Great Peter Street.
  • St. ANN'S COURT, Wardour Street, Soho, is about the middle of the east side of the street, and leads to Dean Street, Soho Square.
  • St. ANN'S COURT, Upper Well Alley, Wapping, is the second turning on the left from Wapping Street, or five houses on the right from Green Bank, near Wapping Church.
  • St. ANN'S LANE, Westminster, is in Orchard Street, about six houses on the left from Dean Street, leading to Great Peter Street.
  • St. ANN'S LANE, Foster Lane, Cheapside, is at 17, and leads to St. Martin's-le-Grand.
  • St. ANN'S PLACE, Commercial Road, Limehouse, is part of the north side, commencing at the Britannia public house, by the bridge, and extending to opposite the church.
  • St. ANN'S PLACE, EAST]], Commercial Road, Limehouse, is part of the south side of the road, a few houses on the east side of the church, adjoining Commercial Terrace.
  • St. ANN'S PLACE, NORTH]], Limehouse, is part of the eastern side of Salmon Lane, near the Commercial Road. It leads towards Stepney, opposite Wilson's Place.
  • ANN'S PLACE, St. George's Fields, the first turning westward and parallel to Webber Street, extending from Webber Row to Baron's Buildings.
  • ANN'S PLACE, Stepney, is facing the south west corner of the church, by the Ship public house.
  • St. ANN'S ROW, Limehouse, is the first turning on the right in St. Ann's Street, facing the church.
  • St. ANN'S, SOHO]], PAROCHIAL SCHOOL]], Rose Street, Soho, is the first house on the left hand side, and about four houses from Crown Street. This is one of the ancient Protestant parochial charity schools, upon the same footing as those established at the same period, and is under the direction of the parochial authorities.
  • ANN STREET, Pentonville, is the second turning eastward from the chapel, it extends from King's Row to Henry Street, and is about a q�???uarter of a mile from Islington.
  • ANN STREET, Bethnal Green Road, is the north west corner of Wilmot Square, leading to Portland Row, about two thirds of a mile from Shoreditch.
  • ANN STREET, Bethnal Green Road, is on the east of Wilmot Square, leading from the road to Mary's Row and Wilmot's Folly.
  • ANN STREET, St. George's in the East, is the third turning eastward parallel to Cannon Street, New Road. It extends from Upper to Lower Chapman Street.
  • ANN'S STREET, LITTLE]], Lower Chapman Street, St. George's in the East, is the fourth turning on the left hand from Cannon Street, New Road, and a few doors eastward of Catherine Street.
  • St. ANN'S STREET, Limehouse, is the first turning on the left hand, eastward, from the Britannia, in the Commercial Road, and nearly opposite the church. It extend from Ann's Place to the new cut of the river Lee.
  • St. ANN'S WORKHOUSE, Soho, is the first house on the left in Rose Street from Greek Street, and is supported in a similar manner to other parochial establishments for the relief and employment of the poor.
  • St. ANNE'S, Blackfriars, the Church of, stood formerly on the east side of Churchyard Alley, in the precinct of Blackfriars, and in the ward of Farringdon Within; but having suffered in the fatal calamity of 1666, and being very small, the parish was united to that of St. Andrew Wardrobe, which see.
  • St. ANNE'S, Limehouse, the Church of, is situated on the south side of the Commercial Road, which leads from Whitechapel to the East and West India Docks; about seven furlongs eastward from Shadwell Church, nearly half a mile northward of the river Thames, and about two miles and a half from the Royal Exchange. This church derives its name from the same saint as the preceding, and receives its addition from its situation at Limehouse, which, according to Stow, was originally called Limehurst, a Saxon word, implying a grove of lime trees, on account of the number of that description of trees which formerly grew in that neighbourhood, Limehouse was formerly a hamlet belonging to the parish of Stepney, or Stebon Heath; but being joined to the metropolis by the great increase of buildings in that part, the commissioners for building fifty new churches in Queen Anne's reign, ordered one of them to be built on this spot. It was designed by Nicholas Hawksmoor, a favourite pupil of Sir Christopher Wren, and architect of those fine edifices the churches of St. Mary Woolnoth, Lombard Street, and St. George, Bloomsbury. - [see those two churches] The foundations were began in the year 1712, and was finished in 1724. It is a rectory, which is not to be held in commendam,\\'86 and the advowson, as well as that of its mother parish, St. Dunstan's, Stepney, is in the principal and scholars of King's Hall, and Brasenose College, Oxford. The present rector is the Rev. John Radcliffe, who was instituted in 1807. The building is of singular but picturesque construction, and of great originality, particularly the tower and spire. The entrance door under the tower is protected by a portico, covered with a cupola. The tower is embellished by a large window, dressed with columns and pilasters of the Corinthian order. The angles of the tower are strengthened by massive pilasters, which have on their acroteria a series of sculptured vases. The upper portion of the tower is plain and massive, which supports four angular turrets, and a more lofty one in the centre.

[\\'86 This phrase of modern Latin is used to denote a person \\ldblquote commended\\rdblquote or recommended to the care of a living whilst the church is vacant. It is also used by a fictio�???n to permit a bishop to retain the profits of a living within or without his own diocese.]

  • St. ANNE'S LANE, LITTLE]], is the first turning on the west to Great St. Anne's Lane, and leads from Old Pye Street to Great Peter Street.
  • ANSEL'S RENTS, Three Colt Street, Limehouse, at the back of the said street, nearly opposite Ropemakers' Fields.
  • ANTELOPE GARDENS, Holywell Mount, is at the corner of Phipp's Street and Luke's Street, Curtain Road.
  • ANTHONY STREET, St. George's in the East, is the second turning eastward and parallel to Cannon Street, New Road. It extends from Lower Chapman Street, to Back Lane.
  • St. ANTHONY'S or St. ANTHOLIN'S CHURCH, Budge Row, is at the south west corner of Size Lane, Bucklersbury, and Budge Row, Queen Street, Cheapside, which runs in a direct line from Watling Street to Cannon Street. It was erected by Sir Christopher Wren, in 1682; and although it has no great pretensions to taste it is a scientific, well constructed church. The interior is of the Tuscan order, is sixty six feet long, fifty four broad, and forty four high. The roof is in the form of an elliptical cupola, enlightened by four lantern windows, and supported by columns of the Composite order. The steeple is composed of a plain solid tower, and an octagonal spire, with a Corinthian capital by way of a filial, which is too formal for such an ornament, and leads the spectator to consider too much of the order whence it is derived, to think it either beautiful in itself or well applied to its situation. - This church receives its name from St. Anthony, an Egyptian hermit, and founder of the order of Eremites of St. Anthony. The time of its foundation is not known; but that it is of great antiquity appears from its being in the gift the canons of St. Paul, in 1181. It was rebuilt, in 1399, by Thomas Knolles, Mayor of London; again, in 1513, by John Tate, mercer. In 1616 it was repaired and beautified at the expense of one thousand pounds, raised by the contributions several munificent parishioners; but being destroyed by the fire of London, in 1666 it was rebuilt in 1682, as before mentioned. To this parish is annexed that of St. John the Baptist, whose church, before the fire of London, stood close by Walbrook. The antiquity of this church appears from the mention of it by Ralph de Diceto, Dean of St. Paul's in 1181. The canons of St. Paul were its patrons, and gave it to the convent of St. Helen, in whom it continued till the suppression of their nunnery, when it devolved to the crown, in which it still remains, so that the presentation to the united parishes is alternately in the crown, and dean and chapter of St. Paul's. The present rector is the Rev. John Gordon, who was instituted by the dean and chapter in 1827.
  • ANTIGUA PLACE, Limehouse, is in Salmon Lane, White Horse Street, which reaches from Ratcliffe to Limehouse, and is the continuation of Wilson Place, the first turning on the left from the Commercial Road towards Stepney.
  • ANTIQUARIES, SOCIETY OF. This society holds its meetings at its apartments in the south wing of Somerset Place, Strand, next the street; the entrance to which is at the first door on the left under the first archway nearest to Temple Bar. It was originally founded about the year 1580, by some of the most learned men in the Kingdom, who possessed a love for the study of antiquities. Its meetings were frequently discontinued till its revival in the year 1717, by a number of gentlemen of similar pursuits, but who were inclined more particularly to the study of the antiquities of their native country. Their number was origina�???lly restricted to one hundred, and the members met weekly. At length, in 1751, they obtained the grant of a charter from King George II., who became their founder and first patron. Under this charter they became a body corporate, with power to have and use a common seal, and to enjoy other rights and privileges as are usual to corporate bodies. It also directs that the society shall be governed by a council of twenty-one members, of which, the president for the time being shall always be one; and that Martin Folkes, Esq., shall be the first president, and twenty other members, whose names are enumerated to be the first council. The election of officers and council takes place on the 23rd day of April, St. George's day, in every year. In 1752 the society increased its numbers to one hundred and fifty, and in 1755 to one hundred and eighty, exclusive of peers, privy councillors, and judges, that should be chosen after that time. They also gave the management of their affairs entirely to the council, who are a standing committee for that purpose; and thereby assimilating their government to that of their more ancient neighbour the Royal Society. The rooms in which the society hold their meetings are contiguous to those of the Royal Society. The general meeting room is on the one pair story, and is both spacious and commodious. The library is on the ground story, and very lofty, it contains a large collection of books, and has a portrait of Dean Milles, by Miss Black. In this apartment are many curious relicts of antiquity, among which are some from Egypt, and others taken from the walls of the House of Commons, when that ancient edifice was enlarged at the time of the union of Great Britain and Ireland in 1800. The fellows of this society have the privilege of adding the initials F.A.S. to their names. They hold their general meetings on Thursday evenings from the beginning of November till the end of Trinity term in every year, and pay on admission the sum of eight guineas, and four guineas a year afterward; but the sum of fifty guineas in one payment constitutes a fellow for life without any other contribution. Eminent foreigners are admitted as honorary and corresponding members without payment, and visitors may attend with an introduction from a fellow. This society has published a number of volumes of their transactions, under the title of \\ldblquote Arch\\'e6ologia,\\rdblquote with a great variety of good engravings of curious English antiquities. Every person desirous of becoming a fellow of this society, excepting peers of the realm, privy councillors, or judges of the land, must be recommended by three or more of the fellows in a paper signed by themselves, specifying the name, addition, profession and chief qualification of the candidate, and the place of his abode. When this paper has been read at one of the meetings and entered by the secretary, it is hung up in the public room during the time of four other meeting nights; the election is then determined by ballot. The above named exceptions are balloted for at the same meeting whereon they are proposed. The new made fellow, after he has paid his admission fee and signed the obligation, whereby he promises, that he will, to the utmost of his power, promote the honour and interest of the society and observe its statutes and orders, is led up to the chair, when the president or presiding officer, takes him by the hand, and admits him by the authority and in the name of the society a fellow thereof. The present officers are; Patron the King; the Earl of Aberdeen, President; Hudson Gurney, Henry Hallam, W. R. Hamilton, Esqs., and the Right Hon. Charies W. W. Wynne, Vice Presidents; Thomas Amyot, and James H. Markland, Esqs., Treasurers; Nicholas Carlisle, Esq., and Henry Ellis, B.C.L., Secretaries; seven other members of the council, and Mr. John Martin, Clerk.
  • ANTI SLAVERY SOCIETY, THE]], is held at No. 18, Aldermanbury, and is, as its name imports, a society for the abolition of slavery. It was established in 1823, and is mana�???ged under the patronage of H.R.H. the Duke of Gloucester, Wm. Smith, Esq., M.P., Chairman; Samuel Hoare, Esq., Treasurer; Thomas Pringle, Esq., Secretary; Mr. Thomas A. Hart, Clerk; and Wm. Eddrup, of No. 51, Houndsditch, Collector; of either of whom further particulars may be had.
  • APOLLO BUILDINGS, St. George's, is the first turning on the left in Tower Street, in going from the Asylum, Westminster Bridge Road.
  • APOLLO BUILDINGS, East Lane, Walworth, is about the middle of that lane, on both sides, and about a quarter of a mile from the Kent Road, but a little more from the Walworth High Road, in the opposite direction.
  • APOLLO COURT, Fleet Street, is on the north side of the street, by Temple Bar, leading to Bell Yard, but its original name is now almost lost in that of Bell Yard.
  • APOTHECARIES' HALL, Water Lane, Blackfriars, is at the east end of Union Street, from the middle of the east side of Bridge Street. This edifice has a pair of iron gates next the street, which leads into an open courtyard, at the upper end of which is the hall, built of brick and stone, and decorated with columns of the Tuscan order. The ceilings of the courtroom and hall are ornamented with fretwork in stucco, and the walls of the latter are embellished with panelled wainscotting, fourteen feet high. In the hall is a portrait of King James I., who incorporated the Company, and also a bust of Dr. Gideon Delaun, His Majesty's apothecary, who was mainly instrumental in separating the Company from the Grocers, and was also a considerable benefactor to his newly formed Company. By the sides of the hall are laboratories, warehouses, drug grinding mills, and a retail shop for the dispensing of pure drugs and other medicines. The Company have also a spacious and well stocked physic garden at Chelsea, given to them by Sir Hans Sloane. - [see Botanical Gardens, Chelsea] This Company were with that of the Grocers in 1606, but were separated in 1617, and incorporated solely by King James I., by the name of the Master, Wardens and Society of the art and mystery of Apothecaries in the City of London. At this time there were only 104 apothecaries' shops in the metropolis and its suburbs. The company if governed by a master, who for this year (1830) is Joseph Hurlock, Esq., two wardens, twenty-one assistants, and 144 livery men; besides which they have a court of twelve examiners, of which Henry Robinson, Esq., is Chairman; John Watson, Esq., Secretary; Henry Field, Esq., Treasurer of the Society's Trade; James L. Wheeler, Esq., F.L.S., Professor and Lecturer on Botany; William Thomas Brande, Esq., Superintending Chemical Operator and Lecturer on Chemistry and Materia Medica; Henry Hennell, Chemical Operator; and William Anderson, F.L.S., Principal Gardener at Chelsea.
  • APPLEBY COURT, Bermondsey, is about half a mile on the right hand side up Bermondsey Street, going from Tooley Street.
  • APPLE TREE YARD, St. James's, is the first turning on the right hand in York Street, St. James's Square, between the north side of that square and Jermyn Street, Piccadilly.
  • APSLEY HOUSE, Hyde Park Corner, is at the upper end of Piccadilly, and looks into that great thoroughfare and the park. It is the town mansion of his Grace the Duke of Wellington, and has recently been enlarged, and newly fronted, from the designs and under the superintendence of Messrs. Benjamin and Philip Wyatt. It was previously the residence of his grace's elder brother, the Marquess Wellesley. The principal front, next Piccadilly, consists of a centre and two wings. The portico is tetrastyle, and of th�???e Corinthian order, raised upon a rusticated arcade of three openings, which lead to the entrance hall. The wings have each two windows in width; and the whole of the ground story, which forms the basement of the building, is also rusticated. The west front, next the park, has four windows, to which are added a handsome balcony; and the portico is surmounted by a pediment of graceful proportions.
  • ARABELLA GARDENS, Chelsea, are on the west side of Grosvenor Row, near the first mile stone on the road from Buckingham Palace to Chelsea.
  • ARABELLA ROW, Pimlico, is the first turning on the right hand, about the sixth of a mile from Buckingham Gate, and is continued by Grosvenor Place to Hyde Park Corner.
  • ARCHER STREET, Great Windmill Street, is the first turning on the right hand in going northward from the Haymarket. There is a thoroughfare from it by a narrow passage into Rupert Street.
  • ARCHER YARD, Christopher's Alley, Finsbury, is the first turning on the left hand, a few doors from Wilson Street, Finsbury.
  • ARCHES, COURT OF]], Doctors' Commons, is held in College Square, Knight Rider Street. This is the highest ecclesiastical court in the Kingdom, and derives its name from having been formerly kept in Bow Church, Cheapside, which was originally built upon arches, and thence called St. Mary de Arcabus, or of the bows, or arches, and at which the court then sat for the dispatch of business. As this is the highest court of the Archbishop of Canterbury, hither all appeals in ecclesiastical matters within his province are directed. The judge of this court is called the Dean of the Arches, from his having jurisdiction over a deanery in London, consisting of thirteen parishes, or peculiars, which are exempt from the Bishop of London's jurisdiction. This office is at present filled by the Right Hon. Sir John Nicholl, M.P., who is also the Official Provincial The other officers are William Townsend, Esq., Registrar and Examiner, an actuary, a beadle, a cryer, besides advocates and procurators, or proctors.
  • ARCHES, COURT OF]], REGISTER OFFICE]], is in Dean's Court, Doctors' Commons.
  • ARCHIBALD PLACE, Walburgh Street, St. George's in the East, is the first turning on the right hand from Back Lane towards Chapman Street.
  • ARGYLL or ARGYLE STREET, Oxford Street, is about a third of a mile from Tottenham Court Road, on the left hand, and leads into Great Marlborough Street, and, by Argyle Place, into Regent Street. Near the centre of this street, on the eastern side, is Argyle House, a plain, neat-built mansion with a spacious courtyard in the front.
  • ARGYLE STREET, LITTLE]], is the first turning on the right in Argyle Street from Oxford Street, and leads, as before, into Regent Street.
  • ARGYLE PLACE, Regent Street, runs from the end of Great Marlborough Street into Regent Street, and crosses the southern end of Argyle Street, Oxford Street.
  • ARIS BUILDINGS, Bowling Green Lane, Clerkenwell, is the first turning on the right hand from Rosamond Street, towards Coppice Row, or the second on the left from Coppice Row in the opposite direction.
  • [[A�???RLINGTON STREET]], Piccadilly, is about one third of a mile on the left hand from the Haymarket, and is the first street south west parallel to St. James's Street. There are several fine mansions on the east side of this street, which look into the Green Park, particularly those of Earl Spencer, the Marquess of Tavistock, the Duke of Rutland, Marquess Camden, and others.
  • ARLINGTON STREET, Camden Town, or Regent's Park, is by the side of the Southampton Arms, at the lower end of the Hampstead Road.
  • ARMOURERS' AND BRAZIERS' HALL, is at the north east corner of Coleman Street and London Wall. It is a plain substantial brick building, with an attached portico of the Doric order. It was designed by the late Mr. William Creswell. The hall for the meeting of the company is a spacious plain room, ornamented with a fine picture by James Northcote, Esq., R.A., of the entry of Richard II. and Bolinbroke, afterwards Henry IV., into London. This picture was purchased by the Company, on the dispersion of Boydell's Shakspeare Gallery in May, 1825. The company was incorporated by King Henry VI., about the year 1423, by the tide of \\ldblquote The Master and Wardens, Brothers and Sisters of the Fraternity or Guild of St. George, of the men of the mystery of the Armourers of the City of London.\\rdblquote The same king also became one of the members. To this company, which formerly made coats of mail, is united that of the Braziers, and they are jointly governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-one assistants. It is the twenty-second in rank among the livery companies, or the tenth after the twelve chief or principal companies.
  • ARMY PAY OFFICE, Horse Guards, the entrance is a few yards on the left (under the arch) from Whitehall.
  • [[ARMY VICTUALLING OFFICE. - [see Victualling Office]
  • ARNOLD'S PLACE, Walworth, is the first turning on the west, parallel to the terrace, on the main Road, extending from Hanover Street to Amelia Street, or may be considered as the continuation of Francis Street, Newington.
  • ARNOLD'S PARAGON, Walworth, is behind the middle of the west side of Arnold's Place.
  • ARTHUR PLACE, St. Luke's, is the first turning on the north and parallel to Great Arthur Street, and a part of Bell Alley leading from Goswell Street to Turk's Court and Golden Lane.
  • ARTHUR STREET, GREAT]], Goswell Street, St. Luke's, communicates with No. 10, Goswell Street, by New Court, and is continued by Ball Yard to Golden Lane.
  • ARTHUR STREET, LITTLE]], Goswell Street, St. Luke's, the first south parallel to the last described, and communicates with it.
  • ARTICHOKE COURT, Whitecross Street, Cripplegate, is about seven houses on the right hand from Beech Lane, Barbican, towards Wood Street, Cheapside.
  • ARTICHOKE COURT, Cannon Street, is about the middle of the south side of that street, and is opposite Abchurch Lane, from the site of the old General Post Office, Lombard Street.
  • ARTICHOKE COURT, Lambeth, is in Artichoke Yard, the first turning on the left from Lambeth Marsh.
  • ARTICHOKE HILL, Ratcliffe Highway, is opposite Princes S�???quare, and leads to Pennington Street and the London Docks.
  • ARTICHOKE ROW, Mile End, is part of the south side of the road opposite the Bell and Mackarel, about one third of a mile on the right hand from Aldgate Pump.
  • ARTICHOKE YARD, Lambeth Marsh, is the second turning on the left from Westminster Bridge Road towards Blackfriars' Road.
  • ARTILLERY COURT, Chiswell Street, is the first turning on the right from Finsbury Square, leading to the Artillery Ground.
  • ARTILLERY GROUND, Finsbury, is on the west of Finsbury Square, and has three entrances, viz. up Artillery Court, Chiswell Street, at the top of Bunhill Row, and at 18, Artillery Place.

It is part of the ancient manor of Fins-bury, or Fens-bury, which was granted, in 1215, by Robert de Baldock, Prebendary of Haliwell and Finsbury, with the consent of the dean and chapter of St. Paul's Cathedral, to the mayor and citizens of London. This portion of the manor was afterwards demised to the Honourable Artillery Company, from which it derives its name. In the middle of the north side is a substantial brick building, called the armoury. The lower room is approached by a flight of steps, on which is the door, under a portico of the Tuscan order, which supports a balcony. The upper story is finished with a cornice, and over the central part is a pediment, on the apex of which is a lofty flagstaff. Near to this building, on the side next Bunhill Row, is a brick building used as the head quarters of the London Militia, and as a town residence for its Colonel, Sir C. I. Hunter, Bart. This large site of open ground is the exercising place of the ancient and Honourable Artillery Company, a volunteer association of armed citizens. The following is the account given by Strype, the historian, from Stowe's chronicle of the origin of this company.

\\ldblquote In the year 1585, the city having been greatly troubled, and charged with continual musters and training of soldiers, certain gallant, active and forward citizens, having had experience both at home and abroad voluntarily exercised themselves and trained up others for the ready use of war, so as within two years, there were almost two hundred merchants, and others of like quality, very sufficient and skilful to train and teach common soldiers the management of their pieces, pikes and halberds, to march, countermarch and ring. Which said merchants, for their own perfecting in military affairs and discipline, met every Thursday in the year, practising all usual points of war, and every man, by turn, bare orderly office, from the corporal to the obtain. Some of them, in the dangerous year of 1588, had charge of men in the great camp at Tilbury, and were generally called captains of the Artillery Garden, the place where they exercised. These took precedent of the merchants of Antwerp.\\rdblquote

\\ldblquote But this useful Artillery exercise became afterwards discontinued for a great while, till the year 1610; when by means of Philip Hudson, Lieutenant of the said Company, Thomas Laveroch, Robert Hughes, Samuel Arthors, Robert Greenhurst and divers other gentlemen and citizens of London, this brave exercise was renewed and set on foot again. These gentlemen associated in the said garden, having sufficient warrant and toleration granted them by the Lords of King James's Privy Council, to whom they became humble suiters in the beginning, for the prevention of all future misconstructions of their honest intent and actions therein. And having duly considered the necessity of the knowledge of arms in so populous a place, and the inconveniences that happened to Antwerp, and other their late populous and flourishing neighbour cities,�??? principally by reason of their neglect of that most noble exercise of arms and martial, discipline in times of wealth and peace, these, therefore, now undertook, at their own private and particular charge, a weekly exercise of arms, after the modern and best fashion and instruction then in use. And, moreover, for their better ease and conveniency, they erected a strong and well furnished armoury in the said ground, in which were arms of several sorts, and of such extraordinary beauty, fashion, and goodness for service, as were hardly to be matched elsewhere.\\rdblquote

From this period, the Artillery Company increased greatly. Gentlemen resorted to the Artillery Ground from all parts, to learn military discipline, and having acquired a competent knowledge of the art of war, returned home to instruct the trained bands in every part of the kingdom.

  • [[At length, the company grew so numerous, amounting to nearly six thousand men, that the old Artillery Ground, or Garden, as it was then called, was too small to contain them. Therefore, they were obliged to seek a more convenient and capacious Place for their exercises, and having procured a large field without Moorgate (the present Artillery Ground), they removed thither about the end of the reign of James I. King Charles II., when Prince of Wales, enlisted himself in this company, as did his brother James, Duke of York; who, after the restoration, took upon himself the command, and named it his own company. Our late King George IV., also, when Prince of Wales, was Captain General of this Company, and paid it many honourable attentions. Among other donations to the company, King George I. gave \\'a3500, and its late president, Sir William Curtis, a pair of very handsome brass field pieces.

The Artillery Company is governed by the King, who is Captain General, President; Sir James Shaw, Bart., Vice President; His Royal Highness the Duke of Sussex, Colonel; Charles Edward Cox, Esq., Lieutenant Colonel; James W. Freshfield, Esq., Major; Bewley W. Hemans, Esq., Adjutant; the Rev. Andrew Hatt, D.D., Chaplain; Ralph J. Kirby, Esq., Quarter Master; James A. Gordon, Esq., M.D., Physician; Robert Pugh, and William Kingdon, Esqs., Surgeons; F. W. Bossy, Sergeant Major, and William Henry White, Esq., Secretary.

  • ARTILLERY GROUND, THE OLD]], Bishopsgate, was a little to the north east of what is now Devonshire Square, in Bishopsgate Street. The site was originally a spacious field called Tassel Close, from its being planted with tassels, or teasels, a species of thistle that are much used by cloth workers. It was afterwards let to the Crossbow makers, who used to practise archery there; but, being afterwards enclosed with a brick wall, served as an artillery ground, to which the gunners of the Tower repaired every Thursday to practise their art. The last prior of St. Mary Spital granted it to them for thrice ninety nine years, and King Henry VIII. gave the company a charter. Hence this artillery ground became subject to the municipality of the Tower; and the streets, &c. which occupy its site being part of Union Street, Bishopsgate, and Artillery Lane, the whole of Duke Street, Gun Street, Seward Street, and Fort Street, compose one of the Tower Hamlets, and the inhabitants are still summoned on juries belonging to the courts of that jurisdiction.
  • ARTILLERY LANE, Bishopsgate, is not quite half a mile on the east side of Bishopsgate Street, on the right hand going from Leadenhall Street towards Shoreditch. It is continued by Artillery Street into Crispin Street, Spitalfields.
  • ARTILLERY LANE, Horselydown, is a turning at No. 6, Fair Street, near St. John's Church.
  • ARTILLERY PLACE, Westminster, is on the south side of St. Margaret's Church, leading from Brewer's Green to Stratton Ground, Tothill Fields.
  • ARTILLERY PLACE, Finsbury Square, is a row of handsome houses that commences at the north west corner of the square, on the left hand side, and extends from Nos. 1 to 25, opposite Castle Street, City Road. The backs of these houses have a commanding view over the Artillery Ground.
  • ARTILLERY PLACE, Spitalfields, is the continuation of Artillery Lane and Street, from Bishopsgate; this place was formerly known by the name of Smock Alley.
  • ARTILLERY STREET, Bishopsgate Without, is the continuation of Artillery Lane, and leads to Artillery Place (or Smock Alley), and Crispin Street, Spitalfields.
  • ARTILLERY STREET, St. John's, Southwark, or Horselydown, is near the east end of Tooley Street, and is the first street to the south, parallel to St. John's Churchyard. It is continued by Charles Street to Dock Head, and bounded on the east by Crucifix Lane to Bermondsey Street on the west.
  • ARTILLERY STREET, St. George's Fields, is nearly parallel to the east side of Blackfriars' Road, and extends from Bennett's Row to Higler's Lane.
  • ARTILLERY TERRACE, Westminster, is near the before mentioned Artillery Place, Brewer's Green, which see.
  • ARTISS'S BUILDINGS, White Hart Row, Kennington, turns off at No. 14, Clayton Street, Kennington Green, the second turning on the right going from Westminster Bridge Road towards the common.
  • ARTISTS, BRITISH]], SOCIETY OF. The gallery of this society is on the east side of Suffolk Street, Pall Mall East, parallel to the Haymarket It consists of an entrance from Suffolk Street, under a tetrastyle portico of the Roman Doric order, designed by John Nash, Esq., which leads to a wide staircase. This opens to a square vestibule that leads to a suite of five spacious exhibition rooms or galleries, all of which are on the same floor, communicating with each other, and lighted by large lanterns in the ceiling, which from being inclined from the perpendicular, diffuse an even light over the whole surface of the walls. The angles of all the galleries are taken off octagonally to prevent dark corners. They were designed by the Editor of this work for this society, of which he was one of the founders, and they were built under his superintendance by John Nash, Esq.
  • [[ARTISTS' GENERAL BENEVOLENT INSTITUTION for the relief of Decayed Artists, their Widows, and Orphans, was originally established in 1813. It originated with artists, and is designed to afford them and their families pecuniary assistance in times of distress. It dispenses its funds generally, whether the objects be subscribers or not. J. M. W. Turner, Esq., R.A., is the Chairman and Treasurer; T. Phillips, Esq., R.A., and Professor of Painting in the Royal Academy, is the Deputy Chairman, aided by twenty-four Directors, an Honorary Secretary, Andrew Robertson, Esq.; an Assistant Secretary, Mr. W. Roper, No. 14, Duke Street, Portland Place, of whom any information concerning the society may be obtained, and a Collector.
  • [[ARTISTS' FUND. This society, like the former, emanated among the artists themselves, but it restricts its benevolence to its own members. It was incorporated by a loyal charter in 1827. The King is Patron; Sir John Edward Swinburn, Bart., President; Lord Farnborough, Sir Robert Peel, Bart., Benjamin B. Cabbell, Richard H. Solly, and James Vine, Esqs., Vice Presidents; Charles P. Dimond, Esq., Treasurer, and Robert�??? Ballmanno, Esq., Hon. Secretary.
  • ARTS, SOCIETY OF. - [see Society for the Encouragement of Arts &c.]
  • ARTS, ROYAL ACADEMY OF. - [see Royal Academy of Arts]
  • ARUNDEL PLACE, Islington, is near Brunswick Terrace, opposite Islington Terrace.
  • ARUNDEL STREET, Strand, is the second turning on the left going from the City, about a furlong from Temple Bar, and extends to the Thames. It receives its name as being on the site of Arundel House, the town mansion of the celebrated Earl of Arundel.
  • ARUNDEL STREET, Haymarket, is in Coventry Street, about five houses on the left hand from the Haymarket.
  • [[ARUNDELIAN LIBRARY. - [see Royal Society]
  • ASHBY STREET, Battle Bridge, is in Norfolk Street, on the north side of the Small Pox Hospital.
  • ASHBY STREET, Clerkenwell, is the first on the right in Islington Road from the north end of St. John's Street, leading to Northampton Square.
  • ASHBY STREET, UPPER]], Clerkenwell, is the second turning on the left from Goswell Street going towards Islington.
  • ASHEN TREE COURT, Whitefriars, is at the south end of Bouverie Street, Fleet Street, and is near the bottom of Water Lane.
  • ASHFORD STREET, Hoxton, is near to the newly built hospital of the Haberdashers' Company, at the north end of Pitfield Street, Old Street Road.
  • ASHFIELD PLACE, Stepney, is at the north east corner of Stepney Churchyard, by the Walnut Tree in Ocean Row, Cow Lane.
  • ASHLIN'S PLACE, Drury Lane, is a turning on the left by the side of No. 12.
  • ASHMAN'S COURT, Temple, turns off at No. 17, Temple Street, which leads from No. 7, Water Lane, Fleet Street, to the Temple.
  • ASHTON SQUARE, Somers Town, is a small square to the northward of the Polygon, Clarendon Square.
  • ASHTON STREET, Blackwall, turns off at No. 62, near the north end of Robin Hood Lane, Poplar, which leads from the east end of Poplar High Street to the East India Dock Gate.
  • ASKE'S PLACE, Hoxton, turns off from Aske's Terrace. - [see below]
  • ASKE TERRACE, Hoxton, is the second turning on the left, northwards from the Haberdashers' Hospital, to nearly opposite Gloucester Terrace, and leads towards the City Road.
  • ASSAY OFFICE, Cary Lane, is the first house on the right from No. 20, Gutter Lane, Cheapside, in the front of Goldsmiths' Hall, which is about to be taken down and rebuilt.
  • ASSEMBLY PASSAGE, Mile End, turns off at No. 18, Assembly Row, and leads to Redman's Row.
  • ASSEMBLY ROW, Mile End, is part of the south side of the Mile End Road, commencing about a furlong on the right hand below the turnpike, and is nearly a furlong in length.
  • [[ASSOCIATE FUND FOR THE RELIEF OF POOR DISSENTING MINISTERS. The office of this praise-worthy institution is held at Messrs. Curling and Procter's, No. 18, Cheapside. Joseph Procter, Esq., is Treasurer, and the Rev. T. Lewis and J. Yockney are Secretaries.
  • ASSOCIATION, St. SWITHIN'S]], is a society formed among the inhabitants of St. Swithin's, Cannon Street, to promote the objects of the Prayer Book and Homily Society, the Hibernian Society, and for the distribution of religious tracts. Its office is at No. 7) Cannon Street, City; J. Sharp, Esq., Treasurer, and Messrs. Ford, Hall, and Adeney, are Secretaries.
  • ASTHMA, CONSUMPTION AND OTHER DISEASES OF THE LUNGS]], Infirmary for the Cure of, is in Union Street, Southwark. H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex is President; the Marquesses of Camden, Hertford and Anglesey, the Earls of Darnley and Egremont, Viscount Goderich and Lords Ellenborough and Calthorpe, Vice Presidents; Welbore Ellis, Esq., Treasurer, F. H. Ramage, M.D., and Thomas Davies, M.D., Physicians; Mr. William Hening, Apothecary; Samuel Amory, Esq., Honorary Secretary; Mr. William Eddrup, No. 51, Shoreditch, Assistant Secretary and Collector; and Mrs. G. Love, Matron.
  • ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON, THE]], is held at the society's house, No. 57, on the west side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. This society holds its meetings, as above, on the second Friday in every month, at eight o'clock in the evening. Its present officers are Sir James South, F.R.S., President; Francis Bailey, Captain Francis Beaufort, R.N]], F.R.S., Davies Gilbert, P.R.S. and Olinthus Gregory, LL.D., Vice Presidents; the Rev. William Pearson, D.C.L., Treasurer; the Rev. R. Sheepshanks and William S. Stratford, Esq., Secretaries; and William H. Smyth, Foreign Secretary; Lord Ashley, M.P., the Rev. Dr. Lardner, and eight other gentlemen, eminent for science, form the Council.
  • ASYLUM FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB, Kent Road, is situated on the west side of the road, about half a mile beyond the Bricklayer's Arms. This charitable institution was founded in 1792, for the support and education of deaf and dumb children. Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester are the Patrons; the Duke of Buckingham, President; the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Duke of Bedford, the Marquess of Bristol and seventeen other noblemen and gentlemen, Vice Presidents; William Nottidge, Esq., Treasurer; Richard Yates, D.D., Secretary; Mr. Charles Compton, Deputy; William Babington, M.D., Consulting Physician; George Birkbeck, M.D. and Benjamin Babington, M.D., Physicians; Sir William Blizard, Consulting Surgeon; Mr. John Castle, Apothecary; Joshua Watson, LL. D. and Thomas Watson, Teachers, and Mr. H. Clemson; of No. 7, Grange Road, Bermondsey, Collector.
  • ASYLUM, CALEDONIAN. - [see Caledonian Asylum]
  • ASYLUM FOR FEMALE ORPHANS, Lambeth, is situated in the Westminster Bridge Road, about midway on the south side between the bridge foot and the Obelisk at the end of the Blackfriars' Road. This excellent charitable institution was originally established by Sir John Fielding, in 1758, for the purpose of preserving female orphans of a tender age from the miseries and guilt of prostitution; whilst its neighbour, th�???e Magdalene Hospital, uses its best endeavours to reform those who have so fallen. After its first patron had agreed on a plan for the reception of such friendless children, they took the house and offices of a large inn and stable yard, called the Hercules, and opened their establishment in the beginning of the June of that year.

This building becoming too old and incommodious for the uses of the establishment, it was taken down and rebuilt on its present improved and commodious plan, from the designs of W. L. Lloyd, Esq. The building next the High Road forms three sides of a square; in the centre of the southern side is a portico of the Ionic order, of the purest and most beautiful example, consisting of two columns in antis, with a well proportioned pediment above them. The wings are in due proportion, and the whole design is chaste and appropriate.

The institution is under the patronage and governance of H.R.H. the Duchess of Cambridge, Patroness; H.R.H. the Duke of Cambridge, President; the Dukes of Marlborough and Devonshire, the Earls of Spencer and Mansfield, the Bishops of Winchester and Lincoln, Lords Bexley and Lyndhurst, Mr. Justice Park, Mr. Justice Gaselee, W. J. Denison, Esq., M.P., and Charles N. Pallmer, Esq., Vice Presidents; Thomas Lett, Esq., Treasurer; a chaplain; two alternate morning preachers; an evening preacher; Edward Foss, Esq., Honorary Secretary; Drs. Locock and Wilmot, Physicians; Anthony White and T. J. Pettigrew, Esqrs., Surgeons; and Mr. William Sanford, Apothecary,

  • ASYLUM OF THE GUARDIAN SOCIETY FOR THE PRESERVATION OF PUBLIC MORALS, is in the New Road, St. George's in the East. It is established, as its name imports, for the preservation of public morals, by providing a temporary asylum, with suitable employment, for females who have deviated from the paths of virtue, and who have either been removed by the operation of the law, from the public streets, or have been awakened by conscience to a sense of their guilt and danger. It is superintended and governed by H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex, Patron; the Duchess of Wellington, Patroness; the Lord Mayor of London, President; John Labouchere, Esq., Treasurer; Thomas Hancock, M.D., Physician; Edward T. Complin, Esq., Surgeon; the Rev. Thomas Webster, Secretary; and Mr. James Brown, of No. 48, Hatton Garden, Collector.
  • [[ASYLUM FOR THE INDIGENT BLIND. - [see School for the Indigent Blind]
  • [[ASYLUM FOR INFANT ORPHANS. - [see Infant Orphan Asylum]
  • ASYLUM, INVALID]], FOR RESPECTABLE FEMALES]], was established in 1825, and is carried on at a suitable house on the north side of Church Street, Stoke Newington. Mrs. Allen is Treasurer.
  • ASYLUM LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, Cornhill, is at No. 70, on the north side, between Finch Lane and Bishopsgate Street, and No. 43, Pall Mall, on the north side. It was established to obviate some of the difficulties of insuring in other offices by persons in the military and naval services, foreign climates, pregnancy, disease and advanced age, on premiums according to circumstances. It is conducted by the Hon. W. Fraser, Chairman; J. L. Lushington, Esq., M.P., Deputy Chairman; nine other directors; O. Farren, Esq., Resident Director; Dr. Ferguson, Physician; Herbert Mayo and Thomas Callaway, Esqrs., Surgeons,
  • ASYLUM, THE LICENSED VICTUALLERS', is a recent, establishment on the north side of the road leading from the Bricklayer's Arms to Greenwich. Mr. J. Gill is Secretary.
  • ASYLUM, THE LONDON ORPHAN]], Clapton, is situate on the eastern side of the road leading from Hackney to Stamford Hill, and has an office at No. 10, St. Mary Axe. It was founded in 1813 for the receptio�???n and education of destitute orphans, particularly those descended from respectable parents, and provides for three hundred such objects of pity. The building is a very classical design of the Grecian Doric order, of four leading parts, a centre, two wings, and a chapel connected with the latter by a colonnade. The government of this institution is in the king, as Patron; the Royal Dukes and Prince Leopold, Vice Patrons; the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Duke of Wellington, the Bishops of Winchester, the Lord Mayor of London, and sixteen other peers and gentlemen, Presidents; Wm. Thompson, Esq., M.P. and Alderman, Treasurer; John T. Conquest, M.D., Physician; J. Hawkins, Esq., Surgeon; and the Rev. J. C. Abdy and the Rev. A. Reed, Secretaries.
  • ASYLUM, MILITARY. - [see Military Asylum]
  • ASYLUM, NAVAL. - [see Naval Asylum]
  • ASYLUM FOR THE RECOVERY OF HEALTH, is an institution founded in 1820, for the reception of persons in narrow but not indigent circumstances, who, by paying a small weekly sum, are provided with accommodations superior to those which they can obtain either at their own houses, or at public hospitals. This institution was originally held at a house on the south side of the New Road, at the north west corner of Gower Street, but it is now conducted in more extensive premises. No. 12, Lisson Grove, Mary-le-bone.
  • ASYLUM, THE WESTMINSTER]], was founded in 1822 in Ship Court, York Street, for the reception of persons who have been prosecuted and punished for their first offences, and of others who not having been prosecuted or punished, have been guilty of dishonest practices. It is also a refuge for destitute orphans, and for females wandering from the paths of virtue, but have not been in the habit of prostitution.
  • ASYLUMS, for other see under their respective heads, as Caledonian Asylum, &c.
  • ASYLUM BUILDINGS, Westminster Bridge Road, is a portion of the south side of the road, commencing at Mead Row by the Asylum, and reaches nearly to the Obelisk in the Blackfriars' Road.
  • ASYLUM PLACE, Lambeth, is on the south east side of the Asylum near Mead Row.
  • ASYLUM ROW, Lambeth, is part of the south side of the Westminster Bridge Road near to the Obelisk, in the Blackfriars' Road.
  • ASYLUM TERRACE, Chelsea, is in the King's Road, near to the Royal Military Asylum.
  • ATFIELD STREET, Lambeth, turns off at No. 16, Gray's Walk, Lambeth Walk.
  • ATHEN\\'c6UM CLUB, THE]], Pall Mall, is held at their mansion, No. 12, the north east corner of Pall Mall, and of the new opening opposite Waterloo Place. It is a spacious and elegant building, designed and executed by Decimus Burton, Esq. This club was instituted for the association of individuals known for their scientific or literary attainments, artists of eminence, and noblemen and gentlemen, patrons of science, literature, or the fine arts. It is governed by a Committee of Management, among whom are the Earls of Brownlow and Shaftesbury, the Bishops of Winchester and Landaff, Lord Bexley, Colonel Fitzclarence, Francis L. Chantrey, Esq., R.A., Sir George Staunton, and sixteen others of its members. Edward Magrath, Esq., is the Secretary,
  • ATKIN'S GARDENS, Bethnal Green Road, is on the north side of Thorold Square, about half a mile on the left from No, 65, Shoreditch.
  • [[ATLAS FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY. The office of this Association is at No. 92, the corner of King Street, in Cheapside, and has a handsome elevation of the Grecian Doric order, designed by Thomas Hopper, Esq., Architect, and the first Surveyor to the Company, It was Instituted in 1808, and empowered by Act of Parliament of the 54th Geo. III. It is under the superintendance of thirteen directors, of whom Sir Christopher Baynes, Bart., is President; Sir Thomas Turton, Chairman; J. D. Hume, Esq., Deputy Chairman; Henry Desborough, Secretary; and Thomas Lloyd, Esq., Surveyor.
  • ATLAS PLACE, Poplar, is opposite the south end of Cotton Street, and is the second turning on the right from the East India Docks.
  • AUCTION MART, THE]], Bartholomew Lane, is the last house on the right hand, going from the Royal Exchange, and the first in Throgmorton Street, facing the north east corner of the Bank of England. It is a spacious and commodious building, erected by subscription of several eminent auctioneers, and finished in 1810, from designs by John Walters, Esq. It is used for the sale of estates, annuities, shares in public institutions, pictures, books and other property, by public auction. The interior is divided into offices, sale rooms, a hall and galleries far the exhibition of advertisements, bills, maps, &c., sale rooms, and a complete coffee and dinner house.
  • AUDIT OFFICE, GOVERNMENT]], FOR PUBLIC ACCOUNTS]], is on the eastern or left side of the square in Somerset Place. The business of this office is conducted by six commissioners, of which Frederick S. Larpent, Esq., is Chairman; John Lewis Mallet, Esq., Secretary; eight inspectors, of which Mr. Frederick L. Rogers is the chief; seventeen senior examiners, eighteen junior examiners, twelve assistants, a minute clerk, and clerk of the fees, a private secretary to the chairman, and other subordinate officers, besides five additional clerks for examining the Peninsular accounts.
  • AUDIT OFFICE FOR THE CIVIL LIST, is at No. 3, Whitehall Place, of which department Robert Plumer Ward, Esq. is Auditor, and Alexander Spearman, Chief Clerk. There are two other clerks and a messenger.
  • AUDIT OFFICE FOR THE COLONIES, is at No. 5, Whitehall Place. The business of this department is conducted by the Hon. Edward Byng, Chairman; Sir John Conroy and John Kingston, Esq., Commissioners; George William Brande Esq., Secretary; a minute clerk, and an assistant clerk, three inspectors, three senior examiners, three junior examiners, and six assistants, besides an office-keeper and a messenger.
  • AUDIT OFFICE FOR LAND, REVENUE]], LAND TAX]], ASSESSED TAXES]], &c., is at No. 11, Spring Gardens. Of this department Charles G. Christmas, Esq. is the Acting Auditor for the counties of Lincoln, Nottingham, Chester, and Derby; Sir William H. Cooper, Bart., and Frederick Grey Cooper, Esq. are Auditors for all the other counties in England; a deputy auditor, two chief clerks, and five junior clerks. Albert Badger, Esq., is the Acting Auditor for the principality of Wales, and his office is No. 11, Old Palace Yard, Westminster.
  • AUDIT OFFICE FOR THE EXCHEQUER, is held at the Exchequer office, Whitehall, of which Lord Grenville is the Auditor, with a chief clerk, a clerk of the debentures, a clerk of the registers and issues, a clerk of the cash book, three assistant clerks, and three junior clerks. In this department is the:-
  • AUDITOR'S ANNUITY OFFICE, and office for examining the tellers' vouchers, with a seni�???or clerk, two assistant clerks, a junior clerk, with a porter and five messengers.
  • AUDLEY SQUARE, is at the end of South Audley Street, near Curzon Street, Mayfair, and opposite Tilney Street, from Park Lane.
  • AUDLEY STREET, NORTH]], Grosvenor Square, turns out of Oxford Street at No. 263, near the west end, or the second on the right hand, going from Hyde Park; it extends to Grosvenor Square.
  • AUDLEY STREET, SOUTH]], Grosvenor Square, is the continuation of North Audley Street, from Grosvenor Square. It extends to Curzon Street, Mayfair, near Park Lane, and the total length from Oxford Street is about half a mile.
  • AUGMENTATION OFFICE, THE]], is held at No. 3, Deans yard, and in New Palace Yard, Westminster. This office belongs to a corporation, established by act of Parliament of the 3d of Queen Anne, tat the better maintenance of the poor clergy, by the augmentation of small livings. This body corporate consists of the privy council, the lords lieutenants of counties and custodes rotulonun, the archbishops, bishops and deans of cathedrals, the judges, the king's serjeants at law, the attorney, solicitor and advocate general, the chancellors and vice chancellors of the universities, the lord mayor and aldermen of London, and the mayors of all other cities within the Kingdom; seven of whom may compose a court, provided three of that number be a privy councillor, a bishop, a judge, or one of the king's council, and this court may appoint committees of governors; and invest them with such powers as they think proper.

The business of the governors, is to find out the value of every benefice under \\'a380 a year, with the distance of each from London, &c., and to lay the state thereof before the king, with the value of the tenths, first fruits, &c., in order that his majesty's bounty may be applied to support those of the clergy who are in the greatest distress: and this corporation has augmented a great number of small livings. The hours of attendance are from 10 till 1, and the officers are Charles Hodgson, Esq., Secretary, Mr. Thomas Glanfield, Clerk, John Holford, Assistant, John Paterson, Esq., of 68, Old Bond Street, Treasurer, William Courtnay, Esq., Counsel, and John Dyneley, Esq., of Field Court, Gray's Inn, Solicitor.

  • AUGUST COTTAGES, Camberwell, are near Albany Road, which reaches from the Wesleyan Chapel, Camberwell, to the Kent Road.
  • AUGUSTA PLACE, Clapham Road, is on the west side about half a mile from the church.
  • St. AUGUSTINE'S AND St. FAITH'S, Old Change. This church is situated behind No. 35, St. Paul's Churchyard, and at the corner of Watling Street, in the ward of Farringdon Within. It is dedicated to St. Augustin or Austin the monk, the English apostle. The old church having suffered by the fire of London, was rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren, in 1683. The interior is of the Ionic order, fifty one feet long, forty five broad and thirty high. Owing to the smallness of the parishes, that of St. Faith's is united to it, and they are a rectory, the advowson of which is in the dean and chapter of St. Paul's, in whose patronage it appears always to have been, for it is mentioned in their books as early as the year 1181, when Ralph de Diceto was dean. The present rector is the Rev. J. W. Vivian, D.D., one of the minor canons of St. Paul's, who was instituted in 1821.
  • AUGUSTUS ROW, Grange Road, Bermondsey, is part of the north side of this road, a few yards westward from the Spa.
  • AUSTIN COURT, Austin Street, Bethnal Green, is the first turning on the left from Hackney Road, by Shoreditch Church. <&#0;???p height=\\rdblquote 10pt\\rdblquote width=\\rdblquote 0pt\\rdblquote align=\\rdblquote justify\\rdblquote > AUSTIN FRIARS]], Old Broad Street, City, is under the archway in Throgmorton Street, leading to Winchester Street and London Wall.
  • AUSTIN STREET, Bethnal Green, is the first turning on the right hand in Hackney Road from Shoreditch Church; it is continued by Castle Street, Virginia Row, and Birdcage Walk to Hackney Road.
  • AUSTIN'S YARD, Bermondsey, turns off at No. 49, Bermondsey Street, Tooley Street.
  • AUXILIARY SOCIETY, St. Giles's, is a society established for promoting the principles of the reformation in St. Giles's and the neighbouring districts, Thomas Meux, Esq., is the Treasurer, and the Rev. W. F. Vance, and the Rev. G. J. Robinson, Secretaries.
  • AVE MARIA LANE, Ludgate Street, turns off northward, at No. 29, and is the first street on the right from St. Paul's Churchyard; it is continued to No. 27, Paternoster Row, and northwards by Warwick Lane to No. 10, Newgate Street. It received its name with Paternoster Row, Creed Lane, Amen Corner, &c., as being the district where copies of the prayers, &c., so called, were to be purchased.
  • AVERY FARM ROW, Pimlico, extends from Ebury Place, Kemp's Row, facing Ranelagh Walk to Belgrave Square, and is about two thirds of a mile from Buckingham Gate.
  • AVERY GREEN, Chelsea, is in Queen Street, which runs from Ranelagh Walk towards the Hospital.
  • AVERY ROW, Grosvenor Square or May Fair, extends from No. 3, Grosvenor Street to No. 30, Brook Street, the first west from and nearly parallel to New Bond Street.
  • AXE COURT, Hackney Road, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from Shoreditch Church, at the back of the Axe public house, and opposite the sign of the Green Gate.
  • AXE INN, Aldermanbury, a receiving house for goods by canal conveyance, at No. 20, about the middle of the east side, and is that number of houses on the right from Cateaton Street, or from Milk Street, Cheapside.
  • AXE YARD, Southwark, is in Blackman Street, near the church.
  • AXE YARD, Cripplegate, is in Milton Street, formerly Grub Street, the second turning on the left from Fore Street.
  • AYLESBURY STREET, Clerkenwell, is opposite No. 191, St. John's Street, about one third of a mile from Smithfield, and leads to Clerkenwell Green.
  • AYLIFFE or AYLOFFE STREET, Goodman's Fields, is the first turning on the south, parallel to part of Whitechapel High Street and extending from Somerset Street to Red Lion Street.
  • AYLIFFE STREET, Kent Road is northward of Harper Street, County Terrace, New Kent Road.
  • AYLIFFE STREET, LITTLE]], Goodman's Fields, is the continuation eastward of Ayliffe Street, and leads to Goodman's Hi&#0;???ll and Church Lane; total length about a quarter of a mile.
  • AYLWYN'S LEGAL WAREHOUSE, Lower Thames Street, is a Sufferance Wharf where goods may be deposited without payment of duties, as specified in the Warehousing Act. No. 90, Lower Thames Street. - [see Legal Quays]
  • AYRE'S ALMS HOUSES, White's Alley, Coleman Street, was founded in 1544 by Mr. Christopher Ayre, merchant and leather seller, of London, for six poor men and their wives. He left it in trust to the Leathersellers' Company.

B

  • BABMAY'S MEWS, Well Street, St. James' Street, is at the southern extremity of that street going from Eagle Street, at No. 212, Piccadilly.
  • BAB'S ALLEY, Southwark, is a turning in Mint Street, High Street, Borough, and nearly opposite St. George's Church.
  • BACCHUS WALK and GARDENS, Hoxton, are at the back of the Bacchus Coffee House, about one third of a mile north from Old Street Road, between Gloucester Street and Turner's Square.
  • BACHE'S ROW, Hoxton, is near the north side of Charles's Square and Champion's Vinegar Ground, and is the second turning on the right in Craven Buildings, City Road. The opposite side of the street is called Charles Place.
  • BACK COURT, Cloth Fair, West Smithfield, is the first turning on the left, and a few houses on the right there is another court called by the same name.
  • BACK COURT or YARD, Whitecross Street, Southwark, is at the corner of that street and of Peter Street, Mint.
  • BACK COURT, Bunhill Row, is in Chequer Alley, the first turning on the left from Bunhill Row.
  • BACK COURT, Limehouse, is the first turning on the right from Gun Lane, near the eastern end of the City Canal.
  • BACK DITCH, Dock Head, is a turning at No. 8, New Street, leading towards Rotherhithe.
  • BACK HILL, Leather Lane, Holborn, is the north continuation of that thoroughfare on the right, and leads to Ray Street and Clerkenwell Green.
  • BACK LANE, St. Pancras, is at the back of Church Terrace, and leading to Vernon Buildings and King's Cross, formerly Battle Bridge.
  • BACK LANE, Bethnal Green, is the first turning eastward parallel to the green, and is the north continuation of Globe Lane. It leads to Blue Anchor Lane and Hackney Road.
  • BACK LANE, Clerkenwell, is in Bowling Green Lane, the first turning westward of Rosamond Street.
  • BACK LANE, St. George's in the East, is the east continuation of the New Road and Cable Street, it is also on the north, parallel to Ratcliffe Highway, and extends to King David's Lane and Sun Tavern Fields.
  • BACK LANE, Poplar, is on the south side of the High Road or Street, extending from the Commercial Road by the West India Docks to nearly opposite North Street.
  • [[BACK ROLL CO&#0;???URT]], Long Alley, Moorfields, is six houses on the left from Moorfields.
  • BACK STREET, Horselydown, is the east continuation of Tooley Street on the left hand, and leads into Broad Street.
  • BACK STREET, Poplar, is the first turning north, and parallel to the High Road or Street. It extends from Wade's Place to Finch Yard, and is nearly opposite to Dolphin Lane, about one third of a mile eastward of the Commercial Road.
  • BACK WALK, Lambeth, is the first turning southward, and parallel to Narrow Wall, near Upper Ground Street and Broadwall, Stamford Street, Blackfriars' Road.
  • [[BACK YARD. - 1. Angel Alley, Little Moorfields. - 2. Shipwright Street, Rotherhithe. - 3. Stamford Buildings, Old Street. - 4. Turnmill Street, Cow Cross. - 5. Wentworth Street, Spitalfields. - 6. Queen Street, Southwark.
  • BACON'S FREE SCHOOL, Bermondsey, situated in the Grange Road, is a charitable institution, founded by Mr. Josiah Bacon, who by his will charged his real and personal estates, with the raising such a sum of money as should be requisite for building a free school within the parish of Bermondsey, in which he was born, and also a dwelling house for the master, limiting the purchase to \\'a3700, and his trustees were to settle \\'a3150 a year for the maintenance of the school, and the payment of the master and ushers. The scholars are to be poor children of inhabitants, and they are taught English, writing, and arithmetic, to fit them for trades, or to keep merchants books as clerks. There are always to be forty, and never more than sixty. The trustees are always to be six or eight of the principal inhabitants of the parish, who are nominated by the minister and Churchwardens for the time being. The minister, Churchwardens, and other chief officers of the parish for the time being, are governors of the school, and visit it as such from time to time.

This charity was, for some time after the school house, &c. were erected, involved in a Chancery suit, but in 1732, Thomas Bacon, Esq. in pursuance of the decree granted to the trustees a clear annuity for ever, charged upon estates at Midloe and Little Paxton, in the county of Huntingdon. Further particulars of this school may be found in Highmore's Pietas Londinensis.

  • BACON STREET, GREAT]], Bethnal Green, is the first turning on the south, and parallel to Church Street, near Shoreditch, extending from the middle of Club Row to Brick Lane.
  • BACON STREET, LITTLE]], Bethnal Green, is north of and parallel to Great Bacon Street. It extends from No. 142, Brick Lane to Swan Street.
  • BADDY'S BRIDGE, is at No. 70, Upper Ground Street, Great Surrey Street, Blackfriars' Road.
  • BADEN PLACE, Southwark, turns off at No. 8, Crosby Row, Snow's Fields, a turning at No. 108, Borough High Street.
  • BADGER'S ALMS HOUSES, Hoxton, were founded by Mrs. Allen Badger, in the year 1698, for six women, who are also allowed twenty shillings a year.
  • BADGER COURT or YARD, Shoreditch, turns off at No. 43, Shoreditch, near Webb Square, and is about a quarter of a mile on the left from Shoreditch Church towards Bishopsgate.
  • BADGER YARD, Red Lion Street, Clerkenwell, is at No. 55, leading to the middle of St. John's Square.
  • BAGNIGGE PLACE, Pentonville, is a few houses on the right hand between Bagnigge Wells an&#0;???d Penton Street.
  • BAGNIGGE WELLS, Coldbath Fields, is about half a mile north from Clerkenwell Green, on the left or western side of the road to Pentonville, and near a quarter of a mile north from the House of Correction. This once celebrated place of public entertainment, is said to have been the residence of Nell Gwynn, whose bust is still preserved. It was first opened to the public about the year 1767, in consequence of the discovery of two springs of mineral water, the one chalybeate, and the other cathartic. It is now used as a sort of tea gardens, and for evening concerts, and other exhibitions, as a minor Vauxhall.
  • BAGNIGGE WELLS, NEW]], are on the right hand side of the road leading from Tyburn Turnpike to Bayswater.
  • BAGNIO COURT, Newgate Street, is the second turning on the right, about eighteen houses from Cheapside. It received its name from its celebrated bagnio or baths, which were the first ever introduced into this country.
  • BAILEY'S COURT, Bell Yard, Temple Bar, is the first turning on the left, at No. 34, Bell Yard, and about seventeen houses from No. 204, Fleet Street.
  • [[BAILEY'S COURT. - 1. Cock Hill, Shoreditch, is the first turning on the left hand from Webb Square, going towards Anchor Street; the entrance to Webb Square is at No. 48, Shoreditch. - 2. at No. 69, Cable Street, Rosemary Lane. - 3. near Bedford Street, Strand, Fashion Street, Spitalfields.
  • [[BAILEY'S PLACE. - 1. Tower Hill is the south continuation of the Minories, by the New Mint, and leads from Little Tower Hill to Upper East Smithfield. - 2. Marlborough Road, King's Road, Brompton.
  • BAILEY STREET, Whitechapel Road, turns off at No. 75, going towards Mile End.
  • BAINBRIDGE STREET, Bloomsbury, is facing the east end of Oxford Street, and extends from the south end of Tottenham Court Road to Dyott Street, St. Giles's.
  • [[BAKER'S ALLEY. - 1. Gardiner's Lane, King Street, Westminster. - 2. No 45, Farmer Street, Shadwell. - 3. Church Lane, Whitechapel. - 4. at No, 29, Long Alley, Moorfields. - 5. Stoney Lane, Tooley Street, which is a turning to the north, parallel to that part of it which is between Nos. 81 and 95. It extends from Green Bank to Stoney Lane.
  • BAKER'S BUILDINGS, Old Bethlem, is a neat paved street, about four houses on the left from No. 4, Broad Street Buildings.
  • BAKER'S BUILDINGS, Rotherhithe, is a few houses on the right hand, below the King and Queen, under an archway, about half a mile eastward of Rotherhithe Church.
  • [[BAKER'S COURT. - 1. Holborn Bars, is nearly opposite Middle Row, and about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from Farringdon Street. - 2. East Street, Manchester Square, is the first turning on the left hand from Blandford Street end, leading into Blandford Mews. - 3. Half Moon Street, Bishopsgate, is the fifth turning on the left hand from Bishopsgate Without and two houses from Rose and Crown Alley, Moorfields. - 4. Castle Street, Bethnal Green, is six doors on the left hand from the end of Austin Street, the back of Shoreditch Church. - 5. Rosemary Lane, is about the middle of the north side. - 5. is on the Surrey side of Blackfriars' Bridge, and between Northumberland Wharf and the Falcon Wharf, on the east side of the bridge. - 7. at No, 1, Phipp Street, Curtain Road. - 8. at No. 16, Petticoat Lane,
  • BAKERS' HALL, Harp Lane, Great Tower Street, is at No. 16, about six houses on the east, or right hand side from Lower Thames Street. It is a neat plain building, on the site of the ancient mansion of John Chichley, Esq., formerly Chamberlain of London. The hall or banquetting room is large, and has a handsome carved wainscot screen, with four columns and two pilasters, with proper entablatures of the Corinthian order. It is embellished with several pictures, among which are one of St. Clement, the patron of the company; another of Justice; and a portrait of the late Sir John William Anderson, Bart., Lord Mayor of London in 1707; a member of and benefactor to the company. The hall was substantially repaired and beautified a few years since, under the superintendence of the Editor of this work.
  • BAKER'S LANE, Chelsea, is near a place formerly called the Neat Houses, now Neat House Row, and is between Turpentine Lane and Willow Walk. It leads from the public house called the Monster, to the Thames
  • BAKERS MEWS, Baker Street, Portman Square, is five doors on the right from the north east corner of the square.
  • [[BAKERS PLACE. - 1. Duke's Row, Tavistock Square, the first turning on the left from the New Road, near St. Pancras new Church. - 2. at No. 15, Baker's Row, Clerkenwell, the second turning on the left from the Workhouse - 3. at No. 240, High Street, Rotherhithe.
  • [[BAKER'S ROW. - 1. is at No. 94, Whitechapel Road, opposite Cannon Street, New Road, and leads to Mile End New Town and Spitalfields. - 2. is at Prospect Row, Walworth, and is part of the north side of the High Street or Road; about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from the Elephant and Castle. It extends from Prospect Row to Albion Place. - 3. is at No. 36, Coppice Row, Clerkenwell, the second coach turning on the left from the Sessions' House, going towards Pentonville, and extends from the north Side of the Workhouse to Warner Street.
  • BAKER STREET, Bagnigge Wells Road, is near the Pantheon Gate.
  • BAKER STREET, Portman Square, is the north continuation of Orchard Street from Oxford Street, and extends from the north east corner of Portman Square to York Place. It leads to the New Road, and its total distance from Oxford Street is about half a mile.
  • BAKER STREET, UPPER]], Mary-le-bone, is the north continuation of York Place and Baker Street. It extends from Park Place to the New Road.
  • BAKER STREET, NORTH]], New Road, Mary-le-bone, is opposite to Upper Baker Street, near the turnpike, and leading from the New Road to Park Place and the Regent's Park.
  • BALCHINS COURT, Southwark, is in Queen Street, about fourteen houses on the right from Union Street.
  • BALDWIN COURT, City Road, turns off at No. 62, Baldwin Street, Peerless Pool.
  • BALDWIN'S COURT, Cloak Lane, is the second turning on the left from Queen Street, Cheapside, and between Tower Royal and Dowgate Hill, under No. 19, Cloak Lane.
  • BALDWIN'S GARDENS, Leather Lane, Holborn, are at No. 77, leading to 32, Gray's Inn Lane, about a furlong in length. In this place is the central station of the National Schools. - [see National Schools]
  • BALDWIN'S PLACE, Baldwin's Gardens, is about the middle of the north side, and leading,&#0;??? at No. 48, into Tash Street and Gray's Inn Lane.
  • BALDWIN'S STREET, City Road, is a few doors west of the church, in Old Street, near Peerless Pool, and leads into Mitchell Street.
  • BALE PLACE, St. George's Fields, is the third turning on the right in the Westminster Bridge Road in going from the Obelisk.
  • [[BALL ALLEY. - 1. Sherbourne Lane, is nearly opposite the site of the old Post Office Yard. It is a dark passage leading into St. Swithin's Lane. - 2. is in Long Alley, Moorfields, the continuation of Rose and Crown Court from the north east corner of Moorfields, and leading into Long Alley opposite Calendar Yard. - 3. is in Half Moon Alley, Bishopsgate Street. - 4. is in Lime Street, Leadenhall Street. - 5. is in the Kingsland Road. - 6. is also called Bell Court and is in Wheeler Street, Spitalfields, opposite Webb Square. It leads into Farthing Street. - 7. is in Lombard Street, nine doors on the right hand from Gracechurch Street, and leads into George Yard.
  • [[BALL COURT or YARD. - 1. is in Golden Lane, St. Luke's about the middle of the west side, and continued by Great Arthur Street, and New Street, to Goswell Street. - 2. is in Giltspur Street, West Smithfield, and is the second turning on the right hand from Newgate Street towards Smithfield. - 3. is in Sampson's Gardens, Wapping, at the east end of Redmaid's Lane on the west side of the London Docks. - 4. is in Cornhill, three doors east from Birchin Lane. - 5. is in Jewry Street, near Crutched Friars, the fourth house on the right from Aldgate. - 6. is in Whitehorse Street, Ratcliffe, the first turning on the left hand from Butcher Row.
  • BALL YARD, is at No. 127, Golden Lane, Barbican.
  • BALTIC COURT, St. Luke's, turns off between Nos. 19 and 20, Baltic Street, Golden Lane.
  • BALTIC STREET, Golden Lane, St. Luke's, is the first turning on the right at No. 99 in going from Old Street.
  • BANBURY COURT, Long Acre, is opposite Mercer Street, and twenty-six houses on the right hand from St. Martin's Lane. It leads into Hart Street, Covent Garden.
  • BANCROFT'S ALMS HOUSES AND SCHOOL, Mile End, are on the north side of the Mile End Road, a little to the eastward of the fine hospital belonging to the corporation of the Trinity house. These alms houses and school were erected by the Drapers' Company, in the year 1736, pursuant to the will of Francis Bancroft, who, although the grandson of Archbishop Bancroft, became so reduced in his circumstances, that he was engaged for many years as one of the Lord Mayor's officers. During which time he acquired a fortune of \\'a328,000 in real and personal estates, which he bequeathed by his will to the Company of Drapers, in trust, for the purchase of a site of ground for erecting an alms house with convenient apartments, for twenty-four alms-men, poor old members of that company, a chapel and a school room for one hundred boys, with two dwelling houses for the masters of the school. He directed also for each alms man \\'a38, with half a chaldron of coals, and a gown of baize every third year, and the school boys to be clothed and taught to read, write, and account; for which the masters were to receive salaries of \\'a330 each, in addition to their dwelling-house. Also \\'a320 a year for coals and candles, for the use of the masters and the schools, besides books, paper, pens and ink; \\'a35 for a dinner to a committee of the court of assist&#0;???ants of the Worshipful Company of Drapers at their annual visitation; \\'a33 10s. for two half yearly sermons to be preached at the parish churches of St. Helen, Bishopsgate, and St. Michael, Cornhill, in commemoration of the founder, at which the alms-men are to be present, as well as the boys, who are to be catechized by the reader. When any of the boys are apprenticed \\'a34 is to be given with them, but if they are only put to service they are to receive 50s. for clothing. In 1735, the company pursuant to their trust erected a school at Mile End, which occupies three sides of an extensive quadrangle. On the east and west sides are the habitations of the pensioners, and in the centre of the north side is the chapel, which has a handsome stone portico, supported by columns of the Ionic order; the school and dwelling house of the master adjoin the chapel.

The Drapers' Company have taken such praiseworthy care of the estate as to be enabled to increase the annual pensions of the alms-men to \\'a318 each, and to admit an hundred boys on the foundation. They are taught reading, writing and accounts, accompanied by religious instruction, according to the Church of England; and are admitted, by the presentation of the members of the court of assistants, between the ages of seven and ten, and are allowed to remain till fifteen, when an apprentice fee of \\'a34 is paid with them if bound by the company, or of \\'a32 10s. to fit them for service. The whole management and direction is in the Drapers' Company, and the necessary information may be acquired at their hall in Throgmorton Street.

A few words relative to the founder may not be uninteresting to the reader. He was, as before mentioned, one of the Lord Mayor's officers, and having, in a course of years, amassed a very large sum of money, by the most mercenary and oppressive practices in his office, left it for the foundation of this splendid charity, and the anniversary sermons to his memory. At his death, says Stow, he so incurred the hatred and ill will of his fellow citizens, that the persons who attended his funeral, had great difficulty in preventing his corpse from being jostled off the shoulders of the bearers by the enraged populace, who seizing the public church bells, rang them for very joy at his unlamented death. He left also a sum to keep his monument in the Church of St. Helen's, Bishopsgate, which he erected in his life time, in good repair. In this monument, his body lies embowelled, embalmed, and in a chest or box, made with a lid and hinges, without any fastening, and a square piece of glass in the lid just over his face. It is a plain cubical monument, with a door for the sexton, who has forty shillings a year for the service, to go in and clear it from dust and cobwebs, but the keys of the iron rails about the monument and of the vault door are kept by the clerk of the Drapers' Company.

  • BANGOR COURT, Shoe Lane, is at the back of St. Andrew's Church, Holborn Hill, and on the west side of the north end of Shoe Lane. It derives its name from having been formerly the residence of the Bishops of Bangor. It was sold in 1647, by the trustees for the sale of bishops' lands to Sir John Barkstead, who was exempted from the penalties of the act for restraining new buildings in London. The last bishop, who appears to have resided here, was Bishop Dolben, who, having been formerly Vicar of Hackney, contributed to the repairs of the highway from Clapton through Hackney to Shoreditch, and dated his letter from Bangor house in Shoe Lane, the 11th November, 1633.
  • BANGOR COURT, Southwark, is in Vine Street, near the end of New Court, by St. George's Church.
  • BANK BUILDINGS, is facing the south front of the Bank of England, and extends from Mansion House Street to Bank Street
  • [[BANK O&#0;???F ENGLAND]], THE]], is the large stone building on the north side of the Royal Exchange, Cornhill, bounded by Princes Street on the west, Lothbury on the north, Bartholomew Lane on the east, and Threadneedle Street, Bank Buildings, Bank Street and the Royal Exchange on the south. It is a spacious and splendid pile of buildings, erected at various periods, began originally by Mr. George Sampson, an architect of much knowledge, then added to by Sir Robert Taylor, and finally enlarged, many parts rebuilt, and brought to its present unity of design by John Soane, Esq., R.A., and. Professor of Architecture in the Royal Academy. It is most substantially built of brick and Portland stone, and has a most appropriate treasury looking appearance. The various elevations are of the Corinthian order, selected and adapted from the Temple of the Sybil at Tivoli. The interior courts, particularly the Lothbury Court, and the various halls, offices and apartments, are designed with an originality and beauty almost unequalled in modern architecture.

For the history of this great, opulent and influential association, the reader is referred to works more diffuse than the present It is at present under the management of Samuel Drew, Esq., Governor; John Horsley Palmer, Esq., Deputy Governor; twenty-four Directors; John Knight, Esq., Secretary; a Deputy and Assistant Secretary, a Standing Counsel, a Counsel in Chancery, three Solicitors, an Architect, a Chief Accountant (William Dawes, Esq.) to whom all its notes are made payable: a Deputy and Assistant Accountants, eighteen Cashiers, five Supernumerary Cashiers, and an immense number of Clerks, of various denominations.

  • BANK COURT, Blue Anchor Alley, St. Luke's, is about an equal distance on the south side from No. 109, Bunhill Row, and No. 99, Whitecross Street
  • BANK END, Southwark, is the east end of Bankside.
  • BANKRUPT OFFICE, THE]], is on the west side of Basinghall Street, at the back of the Law Courts, in Guildhall Yard, where the fourteen lists of Commissioners sit from time to time on the business of bankrupts and their creditors. The Court is a plain useful building, erected in 1820, after the designs of Mr. Fowler, on the site of a part of ancient Blackwell Hall.

It contains fourteen apartments, connected by galleries for the accommodation of the public business connected with this court; there is also an office for the registry of all proceedings in bankrupt cases, which is open to the public.

  • BANKRUPT'S OFFICE, SECRETARY OF]], is in Southampton Buildings, Holborn. It is open for business from 10 to 3, and from 6 to 8.
  • BANKRUPT'S OFFICE, PATENTEE FOR COMMISSIONS]], is at No. 5, Lincoln's Inn New Square, and is open from 10 to 3, and 6 to 8.
  • BANKSIDE, Southwark, the western continuation of the Clink, by the side of the Thames, and extending from Park Street to Willow Street, by which it is continued to Holland Street, Great Surrey Street, and Blackfriars' Road.
  • BANK STREET, Cornhill, leads to the southern or principal entrance of the Bank of England, the Sun Fire Office forming one side of it.
  • BANNER STREET, St. Luke's, is the first street parallel to Old Street, and extends from Whitecross street to Bunhill Row; it is continued by Featherstone Street to the City Road.
  • BANNER SQUARE, St. Luke's, is part of Banner Street, and about the middle of it, on both sides.
  • [[BANNISTER COURT. - 1. Blue Gate Fields, is the first turning on the left from No. 95, Ratcliffe Highway. - 2. at No. 76, Golden Lane, Barbican.
  • BANQUETTING HOUSE, THE]], Whitehall, is a portion of the intended New Palace for the kings of England, designed by Inigo Jones. It is now used as a chapel, wherein service is performed every Sunday. The soldiers of the foot-guards who are on duty, are accommodated in a large gallery, built a few years since for their accommodation. Over the altar, are arranged the various eagles that were taken from the French in the various battles in the Spanish Peninsula and at Waterloo.

The ancient palace of Whitehall upon part of the site of which this classical and elegant room, for it is no more, is constructed, was originally built by Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent, who in 1242 bequeathed it to the convent of' the Blackfriars in Chancery Lane, in whose church he was interred. In 1248, the brethren disposed of it to Walter de Grey, Archbishop of York, who left it to his successors, for their town residence, and named it York Place. It was, however, seized by Henry VIII. when Cardinal Wolsey incurred the penalty of pr\\'e6munire,\\'86 by which all his goods and possessions were forfeited to the crown. Henry improved it in every respect, changed its name to Whitehall. Palace, added a magnificent gallery, a tennis court, a tilt yard for tournaments, bowling greens and other appendages of a royal palace, and also built the beautiful gate across the street, designed by Hans Holbein. When this gate was taken down about seventy years ago, William, Duke of Cumberland had all the parts of it, numbered for the purpose of having it erected at the top of the Long Walk, Windsor, but it was not carried into execution. From the time of Henry, Whitehall Palace became the royal residence of the kings of England, till 1697, when it was entirely destroyed by fire, except the present building, which had been added to it in 1619 by James I. as a beginning of Inigo Jones's splendid design, which is well known to all connoisseurs in architecture. It is built entirely of stone, and has been recently restored and renovated in a very masterly style by Mr. Soane. The elevation is divided into two principal stories, raised upon a rusticated basement. The lower story is of the Ionic order, and the upper of the Composite, with a lofty blocking course and balustrade above the upper entablature. The ceiling of the interior is by Rubens, and painted by that great master while residing in England as an ambassador. The subject is the Apotheosis of James I., and is in nine compartments. The pictures were cleaned, repaired and new lined under the directions of Sir Christopher Wren,\\'87 by Mr. Parry Walton, in 1687, and again by G. B. Cipriani, Esq., R. A., about twenty years ago.

\\'86 A certain writ, by which offenders in certain cases, are put out of the protection of the law.

\\'87 See Elmes's Life of Wren, p. 448.

In front of this building, upon a scaffold erected for the purpose, Charles I. was beheaded, on the 30th of January, 1648-9, having passed to the block through one of the windows. Within the area, behind this building, is a very fine statue in bronze of James II., by Grinlin Gibbons.

  • BAPTIST COURT, Chancery Lane, is in Carey Street, that leads from the west side of Chancery Lane to Portugal Street, Lincoln's Inn.
  • BAPTIST HEAD COURT, Whitecross Street, Cripplegate, is nearly opposite to Bowling Alley, and the fourth turning on the right hand from Golden Lane.
  • [[BARBERS' HALL is situated on the west side of Monkwell Street, Falcon Square, and is deserving of notice as being an admired design of Inigo Jones. The princ&#0;???ipal entrance next the street is enriched with the company's arms, and festoons of fruit and flowers. The court room has a richly ornamented ceiling, and some fine pictures. Among which is a masterpiece by Hans Holbein, representing Henry VIII. presenting a charter to the master and wardens of the company; and a portrait of Charles II. The theatre, which is unused since the separation of the surgeons from the barbers, contains ranges of seats for the members to hear lectures. In this apartment is a bust of Charles I., figures of the seven liberal sciences, the twelve signs of the zodiac, the skins of a man and woman stretched on frames, and some valuable anatomical paintings and preparations.

The company was incorporated in the thirty second year of the reign of Henry VIII., by the title of \\ldblquote The Masters or Governors of the mystery of commonalty of Barbers and Surgeons of the City of London.\\rdblquote Thus the company obtained the name of Barber Surgeons, which they enjoyed till the 18th Geo. II., when the surgeons applied to Parliament to have this union dissolved, and they were formed into, first, a separate company, having their hall. in the Old Bailey; and still. more lately into a royal college, with a handsome collegiate building and museum on the south side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. - [see Royal College of Surgeons]

  • BARBER'S YARD, Spitalfields, turns off at No. 19, Brown's Lane, near Brick Lane, in that district of the town.
  • BARBICAN, is a street so named that turns off on the right hand of Aldersgate Street at No. 77, nearly opposite Long Lane, West Smithfield, and continues eastward to the corner of Redcross Street, Cripplegate, and Golden Lane. It is continued eastward by Beech Street and Chiswell Street into Finsbury Square. It received its name from being the site of a barbican, which Camden says is an Arabic word, signifying a watch tower. It was the advanced post of Cripplegate, and like the others that surrounded the city, was always intrusted to the custody of some person of consequence in the state. This tower was granted by Edward III. to the Earl of Suffolk; he made it his town residence. Since the removal of the city gates, all vestiges of this barbican except its name are destroyed, and it is now a spacious thoroughfare, connecting Finsbury Square with Aldersgate Street.
  • BARBICAN COURT, Barbican, is at two houses on the left from No. 77, Aldersgate Street, by the side of No. 68 in Barbican.
  • BAREMERE'S ALMS HOUSES, Hoxton, are situated in Alms House Yard, Hoxton, and were built and endowed by the Rev. Mr. Baremere, a presbyterian minister, for eight poor women.
  • BARGE HOUSE ALLEY, Upper Ground Street, Blackfriars road, is opposite to Broad Wall, and about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from Blackfriars Bridge, and leads to Old Barge Stairs.
  • BARGE STAIRS, OLD]], is the termination of the last described alley.
  • BARGE YARD, Bucklersbury, is six houses on the left from the Mansion House.
  • BARKING ALLEY, Great Tower Street, is by the side of the following.
  • BARKING CHURCH YARD, Seething Lane, Tower Street, is a passage by the side of the church of that name, and leads into Trinity Square. - [see Allhallows, Barking, the Church of]
  • BARLEY COURT, Smart's Buildings, St. Giles, is the second turning on the lef&#0;???t from No. 183, High Holborn, by Coal Yard.
  • BARLEY MOW ALLEY, Lambeth, is in Fore Street, near the church, leading towards New Street, Vauxhall.
  • BARLEY MOW COURT, Whitechapel, turns off at No. 38, in High Street, about nine houses eastward of Red Lion Street.
  • BARLEY MOW PASSAGE, Cloth Fair, is the first turning on the left from No. 60, West Smithfield, at No. 44, and leads into Long Lane, at No. 50.
  • BARLOW COURT, Drury Lane, is a court in Coal Yard, which turns off at No. 185, ten houses south of Holborn.
  • BARLOW MEWS, Bruton Street, Berkeley Square, is the first turning on the left, at No. 4, from No 152, New Bond Street.
  • BARLOW ROW, Bermondsey, is part of the south side of Long Lane, nearly opposite to Richardson Street.
  • BARLOW STREET, GREAT]], Mary-le-bone, turns off at No. 17, Paradise Street, in High Street, in Mary-le-bone.
  • BARLOW STREET, LITTLE]], Mary-le-bone, is the first turning in High Street, on the left from Charles Street, at No. 110.
  • BARNARD'S or BERNARD'S INN, Holborn, is situated on the south side of Holborn, westward of Fetter Lane, and near Dyer's Buildings. It was anciently called Mackworth's Inn, having been the residence of Dr. John Mackworth, who was dean of Lincoln in the reign of Henry VI.; but being afterwards in possession of a gentleman of the name of Barnard, it received his name. It was given to the society by Dr. Mackworth's executors in 1454. This is one of the Inns of the Court of Chancery, and consists of a principal and three ancients, besides other members, who are compelled to be in common a fortnight in two terms, and ten days in the other two.
  • BARNES ALLEY, Booth Street, Spitalfields, is the first turning on the right from Brick Lane.
  • [[BARNES or BARNS BUILDINGS. - 1. Whitechapel, is the first turning on the left in Castle Lane, going from Whitechapel. It leads into Preston's Buildings and Wentworth Street. - 2. Limehouse, is at the east end of Chivers Court, Nightingale Lane, Fore Street, a continuation of Narrow Street. - 3. is in Wilmot Street, Bethnal Green. - 4. is at No. 8, Gravel Lane, opposite Fire Ball Court, Houndsditch.
  • BARNES PLACE, Mile End Road, is part of the south side of the road, and adjoining the east side of the turnpike. It extends from Epping Place to Harlow Place.
  • BARNES PLACE, Walworth Common, is situate on the left going from the south corner of Surrey Square, opposite to Westmoreland Row by Providence Street.
  • BARNES PLACE, Lambeth Lower Marsh, is on the north side, at nearly equal distances from Blackfriars' Road and Westminster Bridge Road. It extends from Peartree Row to James Street.
  • BARNS TERRACE, Whitechapel, turns off at No. 27, James Street, in Lambeth Street, Whitechapel.
  • BARNET YARD, Russell Square, is the Second turning on the right, in Little Guilford Street, going from Bernard Street.
  • BARNSBURY PARK, Islington, is a district of respectable houses, turning off on the left at the top of White Lion Street, and extends to Liverpool Street, formerly the Lower Road.
  • BARNSBURY PLACE, Islington, is on the left hand side of the aforesaid Liverpool Road, and eastward of Barnsbury Park.
  • BARNSBURY ROW, Islingto&#0;???n, is a turning out of Chapel Street, near the above.
  • BARNSBURY STREET, Islington, is a turning on the left, towards Barnsbury Park, at the south west corner of Barnsbury Place.
  • BARON or BARRON STREET, Pentonville, is about a furlong to the westward of the Angel, at Islington, and the first turning on the right from Somer's Town. It leads into White Lion Street.
  • BARON'S BUILDINGS, Blackfriars' Road, is the third turning on the left in Webber Street, which is the last turning on the right before coming to the Obelisk.
  • BARON'S PLACE, Blackfriars' Road, is the second turning on the left in Webber Street, going from the Magdalen Hospital, towards Lambeth Marsh.
  • BARON'S PLACE, LITTLE]], Baron's Buildings, is the first turning on the right from Webber Street.
  • BAROSSA PLACE, Queen's Elms, is on the right hand side of the road leading from the turnpike towards Little Chelsea.
  • [[BAROSSA TERRACE. - 1. Hackney Road, is a part of Cambridge Heath, on the High Road from Shoreditch through Hackney to Clapton. - 2. is in the Bethnal Green Road, between Cambridge Heath turnpike and the green.
  • BARRACKS, THE FOOT GUARDS', Knightsbridge, are about a furlong on the left of Hyde Park Corner, in the High Road from Piccadilly to Kensington.
  • BARRACKS, THE LIFE GUARDS', Knightsbridge, are at the large buildings beyond the Brompton Road, about half a mile on the right hand from the new entrance into Hyde Park.
  • BARRACKS, THE]], St. James's Park, are on the south east side of Buckingham Gate, near to Buckingham Palace.
  • [[BARRETT'S COURT. - 1. Cavendish Square, is the continuation of Jees Court, from No. 163, Oxford Street, it is nearly a mile on the right from St. Giles's, and extends from No. 2, Henrietta Street to No. 27, Wigmore Street. - 2. is a turning at No. 27, Henrietta Street, Cavendish Square. - 3. is in Fair Street, Horselydown.
  • [[BARRETT'S RENTS. - 1. Rosemary Lane, at White's Yard, the third tuning on the left from No. 58, Rosemary Lane. - 2. is in Stepney Causeway, a short distance from the Commercial Road.
  • BARTHOLOMEW CHAPEL, Little Bartholomew Close, was a Protestant Dissenter's Chapel of some standing, held on a portion of the ancient Convent of St. Bartholomew; to it was also attached a Protestant Dissenters' Charity School founded by voluntary subscription, in October 1717, for the education of the Children of Protestant Dissenters of all denominations, and was maintained by interest of stock, annual subscriptions and donations, and occasional collections at sermons. This stock, according to the reports of the parliamentary commissioners, consisted of \\'a31,917. 5s. 5d. in the Navy 5 per Cents, and was applied towards the education of eighty boys and forty girls, and the clothing of sixty boys and all the girls. Both the chapel and schools were destroyed by fire in the spring of 1830.
  • St. BARTHOLOMEW, BY THE EXCHANGE]], the Church of, is situated at the south east corner of Bartholomew Lane and Threadneedle Street, near the north east angle of the Bank of England It was destroyed by the fire in 1666, all but the tower, which was cased and newly topped at the time of rebuilding the body of the church. This church is of very ancient foundation, for in the year 1331 John de Tyerne was presented to it&#0;???, on the death of John de Aldeburgh, the rector, and it was then so entirely decayed that it was necessary to rebuild it. The living being at the time of the Reformation in the gift of the Abbey of St. Mary de Grace, it fell on the dissolution of the religious houses into the hands of the Crown, in whom the advowson, which is a rectory, has continued to the present time. The present rector is the Rev. George Shephard, D.D., preacher of Gray's Inn, who was instituted by the Lord Chancellor in 1807.
  • BARTHOLOMEW CLOSE, West Smithfield, a small square, so named from being the site of the ancient cloisters of St. Bartholomew, is entered from Little Britain, nearly opposite the Hospital gates, from No. 56, West Smithfield, and from Aldersgate Street by Westmoreland Buildings.
  • BARTHOLOMEW CLOSE, LITTLE]], adjoins the preceding northward, and is near to King Street, Cloth Fair, and Long Lane.
  • St. BARTHOLOMEW THE GREAT, the Church of is situated on the north east side of Smithfield, and at the north end of Duke Street. It escaped the fire in 1666, and is a large plain church of Saxon and Norman architecture one hundred and thirty two feet long, fifty seven broad, and forty seven high, with a square tower crowned with an angle turret It was originally a parish church adjoining that of the priory of St. Bartholomew; but when the latter was pulled down as far as the choir, that portion was annexed by the king's order for the enlargement of the old church. It thus continued till Queen Mary gave it, with the residue of the priory church to the Blackfriars, who used it as their conventual church till the first year of Queen Elizabeth, when the friars were ejected, and the church restored by act of parliament to the parish.

The present church is in nearly the same state as it stood in the reign of Edward VI.; but the recent fire in May, 1830, has opened to view many of the beautiful and curious architectural antiquities which had been concealed by mean buildings.

On the north side of the chancel is an elegant monument of Rahere, the founder of the splendid adjacent hospital, with his effigies painted in proper colours, and his hands joined over his breast as if in prayer, recumbent beneath an arch, with an angel at his feet, and a friar on each side of him in the attitudes of prayer. This monument was repaired and beautified by William Bolton, the last prior of this convent. The patronage of this church, which, in all probability, was anciently in the prior and canons of St. Bartholomew is now in private hands. This parish claims an exemption from the necessity of being free of the city to carry on retail trades within its boundaries. The present rector is the Rev. John Abbiss, who was instituted by the late William Phillips, Esq., of Cavendish Square, its patron, in 1819.

  • St. BARTHOLOMEW THE LESS, the Church of, is situated within the principal gate of Bartholomew's Hospital, on the south east side of West Smithfield. It was originally a chapel to the hospital, and was founded in the year 1102; but at the dissolution of the priory, it was converted into a parish church for the inhabitants of the precinct of the hospital. It is a vicarage, in the gift of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City, as governors of the hospital. The church is an old fabric, but was tastefully and substantially repaired, and the interior rebuilt in 1823, by Philip Hardwick, Esq., the surveyor to the hospital. The present vicar is the Rev. Samuel Wix, who was instituted by the governors in 1808.
  • St. BARTHOLOMEW'S HOSPITAL, is a splendid charitable institution, that has been traced from the earliest documents and records\\'87 to the benevolence of Raherus, or Rahere, in the year 1102. He is said to have&#0;??? been minstrel to Henry I., who repenting and quitting his gay disorderly life, founded near this spot a priory of black canons, which he dedicated to St. Bartholomew, and became the first prior. He obtained from the King the grant of a piece of waste ground, upon which he built an hospital, for a master, brethren and sisters, sick persons and pregnant women.\\'86 He endowed his priory with the sum of \\'a3553 a year, and the estates which he settled on this hospital were then valued at \\'a3305 a year.\\'87 This eminent benefactor to the poor and afflicted of his fellow creatures, whose charitable memory is not likely to be forgotten while the English language shall endure, was buried, as before mentioned in a former article, in his Church of St. Bartholomew the Great, where his tomb, still in perfect repair, affords a curious specimen of ancient monumental sculpture.

[\\'87 Highmore's Pietas Londinensis. \\'86 Gough's Camden.]

  • [[Both the priory and the hospital were surrendered to Henry VIII., who in the latter year of his reign re-founded the hospital, and endowed it with an annual revenue of 500 marks, on condition that the City of London should pay an equal sum. This proposal being acceded to, the new foundation was incorporated by the title of \\ldblquote The Hospital of the Mayor, Commonalty and Citizens of London, Governors for the Poor, called Little St. Bartholomew's, near West Smithfield.\\rdblquote
  • [[Since that time the hospital has received considerable benefactions charitable persons, by which means the benefits of the charity have been much increased.

The government of this and the four other royal hospitals within this city having been found inconvenient, and these five royal foundations having increased in utility and prosperity, and as many wealthy and charitable commoners had contributed very largely towards their permanent establishment, the particular privileges of each, and the power of the corporation, who were governors by virtue of their office, were much involved in doubt. It therefore became necessary that they should be correctly and distinctly ascertained, as a dispute had subsisted for some years between the Court of Common Council and the acting governors of these five royal hospitals relative to the right of the latter to participate in the government At length an amicable compromise took place by written agreement, and an act of parliament, the 22 Geo. III., c 77, was passed, by which the Common Council were empowered to appoint twelve of their own number to be governors of each of these foundations (Bethlem and Bridewell being considered as one) respectively, who were to continue so while they continued members of that court. The title of this hospital was then settled to be thus. - \\ldblquote The Mayor and Commonalty, and Citizens of the city of London, as Governors of the House of the Poor, commonly called St. Bartholomew's Hospital, near West Smithfield, London, of the foundation of King Henry VII.\\rdblquote

In Mr. Highmore's work on the law of Mortmain and Charitable Uses (page 34) may be found this agreement and the act of parliament in full, to which the reader is referred, as their great length prevents their insertion in this work. The reader will there find the mode of electing governors, the style and title of each hospital, the manner in which the corporation is represented at the general courts of these five hospitals, and the mode of sealing deeds particularly detailed. It may be sufficient in this place to state, that the Common Council at their first corporation court after their annual election on St. Thomas's day, or at any subsequent court, nominate forty eight of their members, of whom the names of twelve are sent to each hospital, Bethlem and Bridewell being from there union being considered as one, who thereby become governors, and act as such in all mat&#0;???ters for so long, and so many successive years, as they shall continue to be members of the Common Council, or he re-elected as such members, and all vacancies are to be filled by the Common Council.

The annual court for all these hospitals is held at Christ's Hospital, on St. Matthew's day, where the corporation is represented by the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and the above mentioned twelve members of the Common Council for each hospital. Notwithstanding the whole of the buildings of this ancient hospital escaped the great fire in 1666, yet a considerable part of the houses which constituted its chief revenue were destroyed. The hospital was repaired 1691, and by the liberality of the corporation and citizens its houses were rebuilt and its income restored. The progress of the institution was carried on uninterruptedly till 1729, when on a general survey, under the superintendence of Gibbs, the architect of St. Martin's in the Fields, the buildings of the hospital were found by their antiquity to have become ruinous and dangerous. A subscription was therefore entered into by many of the governors and other charitable persons, among whom was Dr. Ratcliffe, to defray the expense. The latter, in addition to his munificent donation, bequeathed a perpetual annuity of \\'a3500 a year for the improvement of the diet, and \\'a3100 a year to buy linen.

The plan was prepared by Gibbs, their architect, and the first stone was laid on the 9th of June 1730, by Sir George Brocas, then Lord Mayor, and President of the Hospital. The principal entrance next Smithfield, is of earlier date, having been erected in 1702, as notified by an inscription beneath the statue of Henry VIII., its second founder, which says that it was in the first year of Queen Anne, Alderman Sir William Pritchard being President.

The building forms a spacious quadrangle, each side being detached from the other, and joined only by stone screens and gateways. Each building is of Bath stone, with moulded dressings to the windows, and a cornice and balustrade at the top. Over the entrance next Smithfield is a statue of Henry VIII., the second founder, over whom the corporation should place that of the benevolent Rahere, who endowed it so liberally from his own funds. Under this statue is inscribed, \\ldblquote St. Bartholomew's Hospital, founded by Rahere, A.D. 1102, re-founded by Henry VIII., 1546.\\rdblquote Over the pediment are two reclining figures, representing lameness and sickness, in humble imitation of Cibbers fine recumbent statues of melancholy and raving madness, at Bethlem.

The interior of this hospital is conveniently arranged, and cleanliness, returning health and comfort pervade all its apartments. The grand staircase was painted gratuitously by Hogarth, for which he was made a governor for life. The subjects are, the good Samaritan; the pool of Bethesda; Rahere, the founder, laying the foundation stone; and a sick man carried on a bier, attended by monks. In the great hall is a whole length portrait of Henry VIII., and another of Dr. Ratcliffe, who deserves to stand second only to Rahere; also a picture of St. Bartholomew, holding a knife as a symbol of his martyrdom, and a fine portrait by Sir Joshua Reynolds, of Percival Pott, Esq., many years surgeon to the hospital. In one of the windows is a painting on glass of Henry VIII., delivering the charter of incorporation to the Lord Mayor.

The management of this hospital has been so pure and free from reproach, and its revenues so faithfully applied, that its beneficial effects have been more extended than even its greatest benefactors could possibly have foreseen. Patients are received without limitation, and necessity is the only recommendation. Applications for admission are greatly facilitated by the readiness with which all information&#0;??? is given to the poor and their friends at the Steward's Office, which is in the north side of the quadrangle nearest to Smithfield, and where the necessary petition is given gratis. In this paper the name of the disease under which the patient labours is to be inserted, and some housekeeper is to undersign an undertaking to receive the patient when discharged, or to bury the corpse if the person should the in the hospital.

The present officers of the hospital are Sir James Shaw, Bart., Alderman, President; William Helps, Esq., Treasurer; the Rev. Samuel Wix, M.A., F.R.S., Vicar and Hospitaller; Edward Roberts, M.D., Clement Hue, M.D., and P. M. Latham, M.D., Physicians; John P. Vincent, William Lawrence, and Henry Earle, Esqs. Surgeons; Edward Stanley, J. Eusebius, A. Lloyd, and Frederick C. Skey, Esqs. Assistant Surgeons; C. W. Wheeler, Apothecary; John Wood, Clerk and William Wix, Steward. The twelve members of the Common Council, who at present represent that body as governors, are T. Cartwright, Esq., Deputy, for the Ward of Bridge; Mr. Robert Smith, for that of the Tower; John Pulkin, Esq., Deputy for Cripplegate Without; John Blacket, Esq., Deputy, Farringdon Without; Mr. George Ledger, Cheap; John Forster, Esq., Deputy, Dowgate; Mr Benjamin Stubbing, Langbourn; Mr. Perrot Fenton, jun., Castle Baynard; Mr. Robert Carter, Portsoken; Mr. William Stevens, Bishopsgate; Mr. Thomas Corney, Broad Street; and Mr. Samuel Bradley, Candlewick. For accounts of the other five royal hospitals within or pertaining to the city, see Bethlem, Bridewell, Christ's, or the Blue Coat School, and St. Thomas's.

  • BARTHOLOMEW LANE, Royal Exchange, is on the east side of the Bank of England, and extends from the Royal Exchange to Throgmorton Street.
  • BARTHOLOMEW SQUARE, Old Street, turns off at No. 6, Henry Street, the second turning westward of St. Luke's Hospital.
  • [[BARTLET'S BUILDINGS. - 1. Holborn Hill, is a turning on the south side of Holborn, between Shoe Lane and Fetter Lane, nearly opposite Hatton Garden, and leads to Fetter Lane through Bartlet's Place or passage. - 2. Richmond Street, St. Luke's is the first turning on the right a few doors from Pesthouse Row, by St. Luke's Hospital. - 3. Nightingale Lane, is the first turning on the right from Upper East Smithfield. - 4. is at No. 3, John Street, Curtain Road. - 5. at No. 11, Earl Street, Wilson Street, Finsbury.
  • BARTLET'S COURT, Holborn Hill, turns off between No. 52 and 53, Holborn Hill, and is nearly opposite Hatton Garden.
  • BARTLET'S GARDENS, Curtain Road, is a turning in John Street, the first on the right hand from the west end of William Street, and enters at No. 136, Shoreditch.
  • BARTLET'S PASSAGE or PLACE, Fetter Lane, is a turning on the east side of that lane, and leads to Bartlet's Buildings and Holborn Hill.
  • BARTON COURT, Hare Walk, Hoxton, is about a third of mile from Old Street Road on the right hand in Hoxton High Street or Road, and near to the Hare public house.
  • BARTON STREET, Westminster, is the second turning on the left in College Street from No. 18, Abingdon Street, near the Abbey, leading into Cowley Street and Wood Street.
  • BARTRUM'S RENTS, Chelsea, is in White Lion Street, the first turning on the left from Lower Sloane Street.
  • BASHAW RENTS, Bankside, is in Love Lane in Willow Street, the first turning on the right from Holland Street, Blackfriars' Road. <&#0;???p height=\\rdblquote 10pt\\rdblquote width=\\rdblquote 0pt\\rdblquote align=\\rdblquote justify\\rdblquote > BASING HOUSE]], Kingsland Road, a well-known Inn for country stages, is nearly opposite Union Street, Kingsland Road, and about a furlong on the left from Shoreditch Church.
  • BASING LANE, Bread Street, is the second turning on the left hand from No. 47, Cheapside, and extends from Bow Lane to Bread Street Hill.
  • BASING PLACE, Kingsland Road, is the first turning on the left northward of Union Street, by the turnpike, about a furlong from Shoreditch Church.
  • BASINGHALL STREET, Cateaton Street, extends on the east and north sides of the site of the late Blackwell Hall, anciently Basing Hall. It receives its name from having formerly belonged to the family of the Basings. It is westward of and parallel to:-
  • BASINGHALL STREET, NEW]], the north continuation of the preceding, going from London Wall to Fore Street, Cripplegate. These streets and ancient hall give name to the ward of Bassishaw, a corruption of Basinghall, formerly the principal mansion in the ward. It is bounded on the north by Cripplegate ward, on the west by part of Cripplegate and Cheap wards, and on the south by Coleman Street wards. This ward is very small, consisting chiefly of Basinghall Street. Its principal buildings are St. Michael's Church, called also Bassishaw Church. The Bankrupt Office is on the site of the ancient Blackwell Hall, and the halls of the Coopers', Masons' and Weavers' companies. Bassishaw ward is governed by an alderman (Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Bart.), four common councilmen, and other officers.
  • BASKET ALLEY, Golden Lane, St. Luke's, is the first turning on the left hand a few doors from Old Street, and is continued by White's Yard to No. 155, Whitecross Street.
  • BATCHELOR PLACE, Pentonville, is on the north side of the road, between the turnpikes, and extends from Pleasant Place to Maiden Lane, King's Cross, formerly Battle Bridge.
  • BATCHELOR PLACE, Borough Road, St. George's Fields, forms part of the south side of the said road, and is the first row on the left from the King's Bench towards the Obelisk, by the Surrey Theatre.
  • BATEMAN'S BUILDINGS, Soho Square, is on the south side of the square, and leads into Queen Street, between Frith Street and Greek Street.
  • BATEMAN'S BUILDINGS, Bunhill Row, is the first turning on the right in Blue Anchor Alley, from No. 108, Bunhill Row, towards Whitecross Street.
  • BATEMAN'S ROW, Shoreditch, leads to the Curtain Road, about the middle of the east side.
  • BATES'S COURT, Westminster, is in King Street, which reaches from Whitehall to the Abbey.
  • BATE'S ROW, Lisson Green, Paddington, is a few small houses by the side of the Nursery, at the north end of Little James Street, and forms the north parallel to Mitcham Street, and about a furlong distant from it.
  • [[BATH BUILDINGS. - 1. Kingsland Road, is at the extremity of Bath Gardens from Kingsland Road, on the right, leading to the Hare Walk, Hoxton, and nearly opposite the Ironmongers' Alms Houses, about one third of a mile from Shoreditch Church. - 2. is under No, 5, on the west side of Salisbury Court, Fleet Street. - 3. is in Coldbath Square, Coldbath Fields, on the south east side of the square, near the House of Correction, and leads into Great Warner Street, at No. 26.
  • BATH GARDENS, Kingsland Road, has its entrance by a narrow passage leading from Reputation Row, opposite Ironmongers'&#0;??? Alms Houses, about one third of a mile on the left from Shoreditch Church.
  • BATH GROVE, Stone's End, Borough, is on the east side of Horsemonger Lane, by the side of the County Gaol.
  • [[BATH PLACE. - 1. Lambeth is in Brook Street, Walcot Place, and forms part of the east side of that street at the end next West Square. - 2. Fitzroy Square, is a part of the north side of the New Road, extending from the Hampstead Road to Quickset Row. - 3. London Road, St. George's Fields, is the second turning on the left from the Obelisk toward the Elephant and Castle. - 4. Finsbury, is in Bath Court, aforesaid.
  • [[BATH ROW. - 1. Coldbath Fields, is at Coldbath Square, and leads into Bakers Row by Clerkenwell workhouse. - 2. Fitzroy Square, is the first turning in the New Road, west of the Hampstead Road.
  • BATH SQUARE, Finsbury, is at No. 17, Tabernacle Square, Old Street Road.
  • BATH STREET, Bethnal Green, is the first turning on the right from the Salmon and Ball towards Belvedere Place in the new Cambridge Road, formerly called the Dog Road.
  • BATH STREET, Kent Road, is in Somerset Place, Albany Road, which goes from the New Kent Road to the Wesleyan Meeting House at Camberwell.
  • BATH STREET, GREAT]], Coldbath Fields, is the north continuation of Eyre Street and Leather Lane, Holborn, extending from Great Warner Street to Coppice Row, by Clerkenwell Workhouse.
  • BATH STREET, Camberwell New Road, is about mid way between Kennington Common and Camberwell Green.
  • BATH STREET, LITTLE]], Coldbath Fields, is the end of Great Bath Street aforesaid, and connects it with Eyre Street, which is a continuation northward of Leather Lane.
  • BATH STREET, Finsbury, turns off at No. 17, Tabernacle Square, Old Street Road.
  • BATH STREET, Hackney Road, is about half a mile on the right hand from Shoreditch Church, and the first turning north beyond Alport's nursery, at No. 23, Coleharbour Street, Hackney Road.
  • BATH STREET, St. Luke's, is the north continuation of Pesthouse Row from Old Street, by the west end of St. Luke's Hospital, and leads towards the City Road.
  • [[BATH TERRACE. - 1. St. George's in the East, is part of the north side of the New Road or Back Lane, near Cannon Street turnpike, at the corner of Anthony Street. - 2. Horsemonger Lane, is on the east side of the Surrey County Gaol, in that lane which is nearly opposite the east end of the King's Bench Prison. - 3. Shadwell, is in Back Lane, St. George's in the East. - 4. is in Camberwell New Road, between Camberwell Green and Kennington Common.
  • BATSON'S ROW, King's Cross, is near the spot formerly called Battle Bridge.
  • BATSONS STREET, Limehouse, is at No. 84, Three Colt Street, on the east side of the church.
  • BATTLE BRIDGE, St. Pancras, is at the north end of Gray's Inn Lane, nearly a mile from Holborn, and west end of Pentonville, nearly three quarters of a mile from the Angel, Islington. It is now called King's Cross, after a new edifice so called, which is now erecting at the intersection of the roads. It is said to have received its former name, as having been the site of a sanguinary battle between Alfred and the Danes. Near this place is the Small Pox Hospital, which consists of two establishments, one for Inoculation, and the other for the casual disease. T&#0;???hese useful institutions were founded in 1746, and were held in various places till the erection of the present appropriate and handsome building, which was designed by the late Mr. Johnson, of Berner's Street, who built the Barracks in Hyde Park, and other parts of the Kingdom. The first stone was laid by the Duke of Leeds, then president, on the 2nd of May 1793, and it was finished fit for the reception of patients, in June 1794. It is a plain, neat and spacious edifice, consisting of a main body, and two wings. In the centre is a cupola upon an octagonal turret, and the whole is surrounded by a large piece of ground, well laid out, and planted with trees. A very copious and interesting account of this charity may be found in Mr. Highmore's, Pietas Londinensis. Its present officers are, the King, Patron; President; the Duke of Bedford, the Earl of Maclesfield, Richard Clarke, Samuel Thornton, and James Barrett, Esqs., Vice Presidents; Isaac Solly, Esq., Treasurer, whose office is No. 15, St. Mary Axe; George Gregory, M.D., Physician; James Cleft, Esq., of No. 23, Red Lion Square, Secretary; William L. Wheeler, Apothecary and Steward; and Elizabeth Deeble, Matron.
  • BATTLE BRIDGE, Tooley Street, is near Mill Lane, the first open lane on the left, at No. 56 in that street. It derives its name from Battle Abbey, as it stands over a water course that formerly belonged to that abbey. This bridge, according to Stow, was built and repaired by the abbots of that house.
  • BATTLE BRIDGE STAIRS, Mill Lane, Tooley Street are about one sixth of a mile below London Bridge, near the preceding.
  • BATTLE PLACE, Southwark, is in Vine Yard, Tooley Street, a turning at No. 100, Tooley Street, on the left going from London Bridge.
  • BATTY'S COURT, Commercial Road, is in Batty's Street, the first turning on the left from the road, and is a part of Queen's Court, that leads into King Street.
  • BATTY'S GARDENS, Whitechapel, is the first turning on the left in Back Church Lane, Whitechapel, in going from the Commercial Road toward Wellclose Square, and leading to No. 9, Berner's Street.
  • BATTY'S STREET, Commercial Road, is the second turning on the right, eastward of Church Lane, and is between No. 11, King's Place, Commercial Road, and Berner's Street, Whitechapel, and nearly opposite to Green Field Street.
  • BAYHAM STREET, Camden Town, is a small new street near the Southampton Arms.
  • BAYLE'S COURT, Strand, is at No. 411, and nearly opposite to Adam Street, Adelphi. It leads to Maiden Lane, Covent Garden.
  • BAYLE'S COURT, Goodman's Fields, is in Cable Street, at No. 60, three doors from west of Church Lane, and nearly opposite to Wellclose Square.
  • BAYLEY'S WAYS, Rotherhithe, are at Bermondsey Wall, a few yards on the left, eastward of St. Saviour's Dock, Dock Head, and nearly a mile east from London Bridge.
  • BAYNES COURT, Coldbath Fields, is in Coldbath Square, on the south west side leading into Great Warner Street at No. 14.
  • BAYNE'S ROW, Coldbath Fields, is on the south east side of the House of Correction about a quarter of a mile northward of Clerkenwell Green on the left, and extends from Coppice Row to No. 13, Great Warner Street, Clerkenwell.
  • BAYNE'S ROW, LITTLE]], Coldbath Fields, is behind the houses numbered from 1 to 4, on the south west side of Coldbath. Square, ex&#0;???tending from Bayne's Court to Bath Court.
  • BEAK STREET, Piccadilly, is about the middle of the east side of Swallow Street, and is continued by Silver Street, Golden Square, to Little Windmill Street, Haymarket. It derives its name from Colonel Beak, the first proprietor of the houses.
  • BEAN STREET, Blackfriars' Road, is in Friars' Street, Clifford Street, or Higler's Lane. It is the fifth turning on the right hand from Blackfriars' Road, and the third on the left from Great Suffolk Street in the opposite direction.
  • BEAR ALLEY, Farringdon Street, is about the middle of the east side, leading to Sea Coal Lane, Skinner Street, Snow Hill.
  • BEAR ALLEY, BLACK]], is the first turning on the right, in the above, and a few doors from No. 27, Farringdon Street.
  • [[BEAR COURT. - 1. is in Bear Lane, Christ Church, Surrey, and is about the middle of the east side of it, opposite Union Place. - 2. is in Butcher's Row, Ratcliffe Cross. - 3. is at No. 44, London Wall. - 4. is at Knightsbridge, in Nag's Head Court, about half a mile on the right from Hyde Park Corner, three doors before coming to the Life Guards' Barracks.
  • BEAR GARDENS, Bankside, Southwark, is about half a mile westward of London Bridge, and leading into Maid Lane, the first turning east from Thames Street. It derives its name from the ancient bear garden, \\ldblquote wherein,\\rdblquote says Stow, \\ldblquote were kept bears, bulls and other beasts to be bayted, as also mastiffs in several kennels, nourished to bayt them. These bears and other beasts are there kept in plots of ground, scaffolded about for the beholders to stand safe.\\rdblquote The safety of this scaffold was by no means so certain, for in 1582, one of them fell suddenly, and many persons were killed, and many more lamed and wounded.
  • BEAR LANE, Christ Church, Surrey, is the second turning eastward, and parallel to part of the Blackfriars' Road. It extends from George Street to near Church Street, and is also the continuation of Green Walk, from Holland Street, by the bridge.
  • [[BEAR QUAY. - [see Mark Lane]
  • BEAR AND HARROW YARD, Lincoln's Inn Fields, is in Old Boswell Court, the first turning on the right from Clement's Lane, Strand.
  • BEAR STREET, Leicester Square, is at the north east corner of the square, leading into Castle Street.
  • [[BEAR YARD. - 1. is in Lincoln's Inn Fields, at the south west corner leading to Vere Street and to Clare Market. - 2. is in Lambeth, the fifth turning on the right from the church, and leading into Fore Street and High Street. - 3. is in Long Walk, Bermondsey, about three doors on the left from Bermondsey Square towards Rotherhithe.
  • BEARBINDER LANE, Mansion House, is at the bottom of George Street, Lombard Street, on the east side of the Mansion House, leading into St. Swithin's Lane, from the south end of George Street.
  • BEARD'S PLACE, Stepney, is in Eastfield Street, opposite the church.
  • BEARDMAN'S ROOMS, Hoxton Town, ar&#0;???e about a furlong on the right hand northward of Old Street Road.
  • BEAST or BULL LANE, Stepney, is on the west side of the church, and leads towards Whitechapel.
  • BEAUCHAMP STREET, Leather Lane, Holborn, turns off at No. 90, in that lane, and forms the south side of Brook's Market. It is the second turning north, and parallel to part of Holborn, extending from Leather Lane to Brook's Street.
  • BEAUFORT BUILDINGS, Strand, is a turning nearly opposite Southampton Street, Covent Garden.
  • BEAUFORT ROW, Chelsea, is the continuation of Lindsay Row, near the preceding.
  • BEAUMONT'S BUILDINGS, Tower Hill, is a turning in Blue Anchor Yard, the third on the left from Rosemary Lane.
  • BEAUMONT'S BUILDINGS, Commercial Road, is part of the east side of Cannon Street Road, commencing at Lower Chapman Street, and extending towards the Commercial Road.
  • BEAUMONT'S MEWS, Weymouth Street, Mary-le-bone, is at No. 22, at the west end of that street, opposite Little Mary-le-bone Street, a few yards from High Street.
  • BEAUMONT PLACE or ROW, Tottenham Court Road, turns off at No. 15, and is parallel eastward, to a part of it. It extends from Tottenham Place to the New Road, near the turnpike.
  • BEAUMONT STREET, Mary-le-bone, turns out of Weymouth Street, at No. 16, and leads to No. 63, High Street, near the New Road. The easiest way to it from Oxford Street, is to continue northward from Vere Street.
  • BECK'S RENTS, Tower Hill, is the second turning on the right in Rosemary Lane, from No. 19, Trinity Square.
  • BECKFORD ROW, Bethnal Green Road, turns off at No. 2, Charles Street, and is the first turning on the right from the road, nearly opposite Wilmot Square, and about three quarters of a mile from No. 65, Shoreditch.
  • BECKFORD'S BUILDINGS and ROW, Walworth, form part of the south west side of the High Street or Road, near half a mile on the left from the Elephant and Castle. It extends from East Lane towards King's Row.
  • BECKFORD PLACE or ROW, Kennington Common, is on the west side of the High Road, and nearly opposite the new Church of St. Mark, Lambeth, the corner of the Clapham Road and the Camberwell New Road.
  • BEDFORD AVENUE, THE]], Covent Garden, is a turning by the southern side of the Theatre in Bow Street, Covent Garden, leading into the north east corner of the Piazza.
  • BEDFORDBURY, Covent Garden, is near St. Martin's Lane, Charing Cross, leading from No. 53, Chandos Street, to No. 10, New Street, Covent Garden, parallel to and eastward of St. Martin's Lane.
  • [[BEDFORD COURT. - 1. is in Bedford Street, Covent Garden, nearly opposite Henrietta Street, and leading to Chandos Street. - 2. is in Angel Court, Strand, and is the first turning on the right from No. 335, Strand, nearly opposite Somerset Place. - 3. is in New North Street, Red Lion Square, nine houses on the left hand from Theobald's Road. - 4. is in Russell Street, Rotherhithe, the first turning on the left from Greenland Dock, opposite Randall and Brent's Dock Yard. - 5. is at No. 2, Bedford Street, Liquorpond Street. - 6. is at No, 16, Bedford Street, Strand. - 7. is in Bedford Street, Walworth, the first turning on the left from Nelson's Place, Lock's Fields.
  • BEDFORD HEAD YARD, Upper King Street, Bloomsbury, the second turning on the right from No. 120, High Holborn.
  • BEDFORD MEWS, Russell Square, are behind the north west corner of that square.
  • BEDFORD PASSAGE, Charlotte Street, Rathbone Place, is facing North Street, at the back of the unoccupied building formerly Whitfield's Tabernacle, Tottenham Court Road.
  • [[BEDFORD PLACE. - 1. is in Bloomsbury Square, and extends from the middle of the north side, opposite Westmacott's statue of Charles James Fox, to the side of No. 51, Russell Square, opposite the same artist's statue of Francis, Duke of Bedford. - 2. is in Upper Bedford Place, Russell Square, extends from No. 16, to Tavistock Square, and is opposite the last. - 3. is in Rotherhithe, and is on the east side of the Lower Road, Deptford, commencing near the east end of Paradise Row. - 4. is in the Kent Road, at No. 17, Thomas Street, the first turning on the right from Poplar Row. - 5. is in Well Street, Hackney. - 6. is in the Vauxhall Bridge Road, Pimlico. - 7. is in the Commercial Road, near Philpot Street, Cannon Street Road.
  • [[BEDFORD ROW. - 1. is in Holborn, the north continuation of Brownlow Street, from No. 50, High Holborn, in an oblique direction, to the westward. It is also the first street to the east, parallel to part of Red Lion Street, and extends from Bedford Street, Gray's Inn, to the King's Road. - 2. is in Mapes Street, Winchester Street, Waterloo Town. - 3. is at No. 80, Great Guildford Street, Southwark. - 4. is in East Lane, Walworth.
  • BEDFORD SQUARE, Tottenham Court Road, is a spacious well built square of houses, with a circular enclosed plantation in the centre. It stands in the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields, except a part of the east side, which is in that of St. George, Bloomsbury. This square is erected on a portion of the Duke of Bedford's estate, on a wretched district, formerly called St. Giles's ruins. It is about a quarter of a mile westward of the north corner of Bloomsbury Square, and near the east end of Oxford Street, communicating with Tottenham Court Road, by Tavistock Street and Bedford Street. The houses that form the quadrangle have a handsome appearance, resulting from size, and are built in a style of uniformity that adds much to the beauty of the square. The centre houses are embellished with attached porticoes of Ionic pilasters and pediments; those on the east and west sides have four pilasters, and those on the north and south have five; one directly in the centre under the apex of the pediment.
  • BEDFORD SQUARE, Commercial Road, is a square of neat third-rate houses, with a plantation in the centre, on the north side of the Commercial Road. It is approached from the road by Bedford Street, which is nearly opposite Dock Street, the fourth turning on the right, going from Cannon Street Road towards Limehouse.
  • BEDFORD STREET, Blackwall, turns off at No. 10, Brunswick Street, Blackwall Causeway, at the corner of Poplar High Street.
  • BEDFORD STREET, Gray's Inn Lane, turns off at No. 19, Liquorpond Street.
  • BEDFORD STREET, Tottenham Court Road, or Bedford Square, is near Oxford Street, and leads from Tottenham Court Road into Bedford Square, at the north west corner.
  • BEDFORD STREET, Strand, turns off at No. 428, nearly opposite the Adelphi, and leads into King Street, on the west side of Covent Garden Market.
  • BEDFORD STREET, Holborn, is the first turning on the right in Red Lion Street, from No. 71, High Holborn, and extends to Bedford Row.
  • BEDFORD STREET, Leather Lane, Holborn, is the north continuation of it, bearing to the left, and leading to Vine Street, Clerkenwell.
  • BEDFORD STREET, Walworth, is the second street parallel to Richmond Place, East Lane, at No. 5, Nelson Place, Walworth New Town, formerly Lock's Fields. It extends from Camden Street to Nelson's Place by Salisbury Place.
  • [[BEDLAM. - [see Bethlem]
  • BEE HIVE COURT, Little St. Thomas Apostle, is five houses from No. 68, Queen Street, Cheapside.
  • BEECH STREET, Barbican, is the east continuation of that ancient thoroughfare from No. 77 Aldersgate Street, and the west continuation of Chiswell Street from Finsbury Square, at the north end of Redcross Street from Wood Street, Cheapside.
  • BEECH LANE, Beech Street, Barbican, is about the middle of the south side of that street, at No. 13, and leads into Whitecross Street, between Nos. 3 and 4.
  • BEER LANE, Great Tower Street, is the first turning on the left from Tower Hill opposite Seething Lane, and leading to No. 53, Lower Thames Street, opposite to the Custom House.
  • BELGRAVE PLACE, Walworth, is on the east side of Little Richmond Place, East Lane.
  • BELGRAVE PLACE, LOWER]], Pimlico, is part of the right hand side about one third of a mile from Buckingham Gate.
  • BELGRAVE STREET, Pimlico, is the fifth turning on the right from Buckingham Gate.
  • BELGRAVE SQUARE, Pimlico, is a handsome new square now building on the estate of the Earl of Grosvenor, and named after his lordships second title. It will consist of a quadrangle of four symmetrical rows of mansions, designed by George Basevi, Esq., and at the spacious angles will be four large suburban villas, one of which is nearly completed, from the designs of H. E. Kendall, Esq., for Thomas Read Kemp, Esq., M.P., of Kemp Town, Brighton.
  • [[BELL ALLEY. - 1. is in Goswell Street, at No. 13, and leads into Turk's Head Court, Golden Lane. - 2. is at No. 1, Golden Lane, and turns up on the left hand from Barbican. - 3. is in Fenchurch Street. - 4. is in the Kingsland Road. - 5. is in Turnmill Street, Cow Cross.
  • BELL ALLEY, GREAT]], Coleman Street, is at No. 56, the fourth turning on the right from Lothbury.
  • BELL ALLEY, LITTLE]], London Wall, turns off at Leathersellers' Buildings, opposite Finsbury Circus.
  • BELLS BUILDINGS, Salisbury Square, is the second turning on the left from Fleet Street, turning off at the north east or upper corner of Dorset Street.
  • [[BELL COURT. - 1. is in Gray's Inn Lane, a turning at No. 22, the third on the right hand from Holborn. - 2. is in Little Bell Court, and is the first turning on the right in the last from Gray's Inn Lane. - 3. is in Golden Lane, Barbican, and the &#0;???first turning on the right in Bell Alley, from Golden Lane. - 4. is in Grub Street, Cripplegate, at No. 80, the seventh turning on the right from Fore Street. - 5. is in Foster Lane, Cheapside, at No. 20, opposite to Maiden Lane, Wood Street. - 6. is in Bell Yard, Doctors' Commons, the first turning on the left from Great Carter Lane. - 7. is in Walbrook, three houses on the right from the Mansion house. - 8. is in Long Alley, Moorfields, five houses on the right from Crown Street towards Moorfields. - 9. is in Wheeler Street, Spitalfields, at No. 43, opposite Webb Square. - 10. is in Fenchurch Street, at No. 163, the second turning on the left from Gracechurch Street. - 11. is in Mincing Lane, at No. 26, seven houses from No. 82, Tower Street. - 12. is in Bermondsey Street, the fourth turning north of the church. - 13. is in Bell Lane, Spitalfields, at No. 14. - 14. is in Gracechurch Street. - 15. is in Drury Lane, at No. 178. - 16. is in Little Moorfields, Fore Street, Cripplegate. - 17. is in Whitechapel, at No. 20, Princes Street.
  • BELL INN, THE OLD]], Holborn, nearly opposite Fetter Lane. From this old established Inn, coaches go and come to and from Brighton, Cambridge, Hereford and other places.
  • BELL AND CROWN, Holborn, is about one sixth of a mile on the right from Farringdon Street. From this Inn the Devonport, Louth, Poole, Southampton and Winchester mails and other coaches depart daily.
  • BELL FIELDS, Paddington, is at the south end of Steven's Buildings, in Bell Street, Paddington.
  • BELL INN, Friday Street, is eight houses on the right from Cheapside, and from which many country stage coaches, waggons and vans, depart and arrive daily.
  • BELL LANE, Spitalfields, is the first turning eastward of Petticoat Lane, from Wentworth Street to Raven Row.
  • [[BELL PLACE. - 1. Limehouse. [see Five Bell Place] - 2. is opposite No. 18, Bell Street, Vincent Square, Westminster. - 3. is at No. 15, Bell Alley, Goswell Street. - 4. is in Whitechapel, and is the first turning on the left in Princes Street, from Baker's Row, at No. 94, Whitechapel Road.
  • BELL'S RENTS, Bermondsey, is in Tattle Court, the second turning on the left, at No. 12, John Street, Bermondsey Street.
  • BELLE SAUVAGE INN, Ludgate Hill, is the first turning on the left from Farringdon Street, and is a very large establishment for coaches to almost every part of England; it is a coffee house, tavern and hotel.
  • BELL SQUARE, Finsbury, is a turning at No. 7, Blomfield Street, Moorfields.
  • BELL STREET, Paddington, is the first turning north between Lisson Place and Chapel Street, extending from Lisson Green to No. 134, Edgeware Road.
  • BELL STREET, Westminster, is in Vincent Square, at No. 61, Regent Street, Vauxhall Bridge Road.
  • BELL WHARF STAIRS, Ratcliffe, a public landing place, by Bell Wharf, the east end of Shadwell High Street, and west end of Cock Hill.
  • [[BELL YARD. - 1. is in Fleet Street, the second turning on the east from Temple Bar, leading northward into Carey Street. - 2. is in the Haymarket. [see Bell Court] - 3. is in Drury Lane, opposite Short's Gardens, and sixteen houses on the left from Holborn. - 4. is in York Street, Westminster, six houses on the left from Queen Square. - 5. is at No. &#0;???108, Oxford Street, nearly opposite Argyle Street. - 6. is on Addle Hill, Doctors' Commons, the first turning on the right from No. 4, Great Carter Lane, and leads to 15, Great Knight Rider Street. - 7. is at No. 42, Little Britain. - 8. is in Bermondsey Street. - 9. is in Little St. Martin's Lane. - 10. is in Mount Street, Grosvenor Square, at No. 58, the west end, about half a dozen houses from Park Street, leading into Reeves's Mews. - 11. is in White Horse Street, Ratcliffe. - 12. is in Church Street, Hackney. - 13. is in Gracechurch Street, the third turning on the right from Cornhill, leading to Castle Court and Birchin Lane. - 14. is on Fish Street Hill, opposite the Monument, near London Bridge, but about to be taken down for the new approaches to London Bridge.
  • BELMONT PLACE, Vauxhall, is a row of houses on the right hand side of the road, about one sixth of a mile south from the turnpike, nearly opposite the three mile stone from Vauxhall.
  • BELMONT PLACE, UPPER]], is in the Wandsworth Road, a short distance beyond the above.
  • BELMONT ROW, Vauxhall, is the first turning on the right in Belmont Place, south from the Turnpike, leading towards Nine Elms and Battersea Fields.
  • BELMONT ROW, Bethnal Green, is nearly opposite Patriot Square, the first turning on the right going from the green towards Hackney.
  • BELTON STREET, NEW]], Long Acre, is the north continuation of Old Belton Street, and leads through Bow Yard to Broad Street, St. Giles's.
  • BELTON STREET, OLD]], Long Acre, is the north continuation of Hanover Street from Long Acre, and extends from Castle Street to New Belton Street aforesaid.
  • BELVEDERE BUILDINGS, St. George's Fields, is nearly opposite the King's Bench Prison, and leads to King Street.
  • BELVEDERE PLACE, St. George's Fields, is situated on the west side of the King's Bench Prison, and extends from the Borough Road to Great Suffolk Street. It is about the eighth part of a mile in length.
  • BELVEDERE PLACE, Bethnal Green, is in the New Cambridge Road, formerly the Dog Row, Bethnal Green Road.
  • BELVEDERE ROAD, Lambeth, is the new name for Narrow Wall, and reaches from Westminster to Waterloo Bridges.
  • BELVEDERE ROW, St. George's Fields, is at the north end of Belvedere Place aforesaid, by Great Suffolk Street, and is continued by Higler's Lane or Street to the Blackfriars' Road.
  • BELVEDERE ROW, Commercial Road, Waterloo Bridge Road, is near Pedlar's Acre or Narrow Wall, Lambeth and forms part of the east or land side of Belvedere Road, and is nearly one third of a mile on the right hand from Westminster Bridge, by College Street.
  • BEMBER'S or BENBOW'S RENTS, Golden Lane, St. Luke's, is the second turning on the right, a few houses from Old Street, and is continued by French Alley to Goswell Street.
  • BENCHER'S WALK, King's Bench Walk, St. George's Fields, is a part of the east side of that walk, a few doors on the right from Higlers Lane.
  • BENEVOLENT INSTITUTION, THE]], for the sole purpose of delivering Poor Married Women at their own hab&#0;???itations, is held in Castle Court, Strand. This charity was established in January 1780, by several respectable inhabitants of London and Westminster, who, actuated by generous principles of humanity, entered on this laudable undertaking. It has met with the patronage and support of the public in a degree commensurate with its utility, which cannot be too much commended. Its design is to afford poor married women, at their own habitations, the assistance of midwives regularly instructed in their business, and all necessary medicines during the time of their lying-in; and in all cases of difficulty and danger, the advice and assistance of a physician and man midwife. Since the commencement of this charity upwards of forty thousand poor married women have been so relieved. Its limits are, Lambeth, Chelsea, Brompton, Knightsbridge, Kensington, Mary-le-bone, Paddington, Tottenham Court, Gray's Inn Lane end, Islington, City Road, Shoreditch, Bethnal Green and Whitechapel Turnpikes, Ratcliffe Cross, Dock Head, Grange Road, Kent Street and Kennington Turnpikes, and the road from Blackman Street to Westminster Bridge. The officers are a President, seven Vice Presidents, a Treasurer, Sir Richard Birnie; a Secretary, James Abbott; a Physician, and fifty Midwives.
  • BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF BLUES, is, as its name imports, a charitable association of persons educated at the Blue Coat School, or Christ's Hospital, for the relief of their distressed school-fellows, their widows and orphans. The society is held at No. 11, Basinghall Street. Henry Woodthorpe, Esq., LL.D., the Town clerk of London, is the President.
  • BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF St. PATRICK, Stamford Street, Blackfriars' Road. This society was established, and is supported by the voluntary subscriptions of noblemen and gentlemen, who are either natives of Ireland, descendants of natives, connected by property, ties of blood, the high offices they have filled, or alliances with families of that Kingdom, for the relief of the poor and distressed Irish residing in and about London, and that of their children, without any regard to the tenets or mode of worship of the objects. It being a fundamental maxim and unalterable rule of this charity, that no religious distinction whatever is to prevail in its execution.

In the year 1704, the Irish Charitable Society was established, and continued its operation till the year 1756, when it ceased to meet. From that time to the institution of the present society, the poor and distressed Irish had no public charity in the British metropolis. The consideration that the capital must be the resort of poor people from all parts of the Kingdom, induced several classes of his Majesty's subjects resident in London, the Scotch and Welch in particular, to institute under chartered authorities, public charities for the relief of the distressed natives of their respective countries. Influenced by such motives, a considerable number of the before mentioned classes of Irish Society, met on the 17th of March, St. Patrick's Bay, 1784, and formed themselves into a body, under the name of \\ldblquote The Benevolent Society of St. Patrick\\rdblquote and immediately opened a subscription for the purpose of carrying their charitable intentions into execution. [Highmore's Pietas Londinensis, p. 844.]

The plan having been presented to the King (George III.), by the Marquess of Buckingham, as President of the Society, it met with his Majesty's entire approbation, and permission that H.R.H. the Duke of Kent should be Patron. In March, 1809, the leading members of this society effected a junction with the before mentioned \\ldblquote Irish Charitable Society,\\rdblquote which had an unemployed capital of nearly eleven hundred pounds South Sea Annuities, and the funds and benevolent duties of both societies were united. The anniversary dinner of the Society takes place on the 17th of March, and I&#0;??? am happy to say, from my own knowledge, that by the prudent management and exalted patronage which it obtains, there is not a more useful and more flourishing institution in the metropolis. For many other interesting particulars of this benevolent society, which are too long and too much in detail for this work, my readers are referred to Mr. Highmore's Pietas Londinensis. The building is on the south side of Stamford Street, Blackfriars' Road, and consists of a central edifice which contains the committee room, office, residence of the master and mistress, and other necessary apartments; and two wings, one of which, the nearest to Waterloo Bridge, is the school room for boys, and the other, the nearest to Blackfriars' Bridge, is the school room for girls. The entrance is in the centre under a portico of the Grecian Doric order, on the acroterium of which are the royal arms. It was erected from the designs, and under the superintendence of James Mountague, Esq., of Guildhall, one of the Surveyors of the City of London.

Its present officers are the King, Patron; \\emdash \\emdash , President; the Marquesses of Lansdowne and Downshire, the Earl of Glengall, Lord Downes, Lord Arthur Hill, M.P., Sir John Doyle, Bart., Sir Henry Parnell, Bart., M.P., and Charles Brownlow, Esq., M.P., Vice Presidents; Edward T. Bainbridge, Esq., Treasurer; and James Charles Mitchell, Esq., 18, Queen Square, Bloomsbury, Secretary.

  • BENEGE STREET, Commercial Road, is in the East India Dock Road, at the east end of the road beyond Poplar.
  • BENGAL PLACE, is in the New Kent Road, near to the Grange Road.
  • [[BENGAL TERRACE. - 1. is in the New Kent Road, near the above. - 2. is in the East India Dock Road, Poplar, between the turnpike and the dock gates.
  • BENJAMIN STREET, Clerkenwell, is the first turning on the right in Turnmill Street from Cow Cross, West Smithfield, and is continued by George Court, to St. John's Lane.
  • BENNET'S ALMS HOUSES, St. Peter's Hill, Upper Thames Street, are a few doors on the left hand from Thames Street.
  • St. BENNET'S, GRASS CHURCH or GRACECHURCH]], the Church of, is situated at the south west corner of Fenchurch Street and Gracechurch Street, nearly opposite Lombard Street. It derives its name from its dedication to St. Benedict, or Bennet, and its vicinity to the Grass Market, which was anciently held before its western door. The old church was destroyed by the great fire in 1666, and rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren. It is a handsome church, and of the harmonious proportions of a double cube, being sixty feet in length, thirty in breadth, and thirty two in height, the two feet in height being allowed by our great master to compensate for optical defect. It is richly ornamented after the fashion of the day, has handsome moulded wainscot pews, carved pulpit and altar, and a richly carved font. It was finished for divine service in 1685. The exterior is finished by a handsome cornice, a lofty blocking course, and light balustrade. The tower begins from the ground, like all of Wren's, and the tower above it is lofty and obeliscal, beginning from five small porticoes, and finishing with a ball and vane.

The Church of St. Leonard, Eastcheap, was also destroyed at the same time, and the present church is now the parochial church of the two united parishes. It is a rectory, the patronage of which appears to have remained in the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's; but as the patronage of the rectory of St. Leonard was anciently in the Priors and Convent of Canterbury, and since the Reformation, in the Dean and Chapter of that see, of which it is one of the thirteen peculiars within the City, the presentation is alternately with St. Pau&#0;???l's and Canterbury. The present rector is the Rev. George Gaskin, D.D. a prebendary of Ely, who was instituted by the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's in 1791.

  • St. BENNET'S, Paul's Wharf, Upper Thames Street, the Church of, is situated at the south west corner of St. Bennet's Hill, Doctors' Commons, and Upper Thames Street. Its name is derived from being dedicated to the same saint as the last, and from its vicinity to Paul's Wharf. This church is of very ancient foundation, and appears from the registry of Diceto, Dean of St. Paul's, under the year 1181. Its distinguishing epithet has been frequently changed, having been called, at various times, St. Bennet, Huda, and St. Bennet, Wood Wharf, as well as by its present appellation.

The ancient church on this site having been destroyed by the fire of London in 1666, the present building was erected in its stead by Sir Christopher Wren, who finished it in 1683. It is a plain brick structure, with stone architraves to the windows, and festoons over them. The tower is at the corner, and is surmounted by a small cupola and spire, the filial of which is 118 feet from the ground. The interior is nearly square, being fifty four feet long, and fifty broad, by thirty six in height.

  • [[Since the fire, the church is also parochial for the parish of St. Peter, Paul's Wharf anciently denominated St. Peter's Parva, from the smallness of its dimensions, and to which it is united, the Church of which was also destroyed at the same time. It is a rectory, and as the patronage of both parishes appear to have been always in the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, it still remains in that body. The present rector is the Rev. Henry Ducane, who was instituted by the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's in 1824.
  • St. BENNET or St. BENEDICT FINK, the Church of, is situated on the south side of Threadneedle Street, and derives its name and addition from having been dedicated to St. Benedict, an Italian saint, who was founder of the order of Benedictine monks, and from having been rebuilt by one Robert Fink or Finch, whose name is also borne by a neighbouring lane. It is of ancient origin, and though at present only a curacy, was formerly a rectory, John de Brakentree being rector thereof before the year 1333. The old church, having been destroyed by the great fire in 1666, the present edifice was erected by Sir Christopher Wren, in its stead. The church, although a fine specimen of its author's genius, is scarcely so well known to the public as the celebrated vender of biscuits and fancy bread next door. It is built of stone, in an elliptical form, sixty-three feet in length, and forty-eight in width. It is covered by an elliptical cupola, surmounted by a glazed lantern light and supported by six columns of the Composite order, between each of which, under a spacious arch, is a large window. The interior is wainscotted seven feet high, with fine Dutch wainscot, is well pewed after the manner of English churches, and has a handsome carved pulpit, and desks, of the same description of wood. The altar piece is in a handsome bold style, and well carved. The tower is square, built of Portland stone, and covered with a cupola and turret.

The patronage of this church was formerly in the noble family of the Nevils; but falling to the crown in the reign of Edward IV., that King gave it to the Dean and Chapter of Windsor. The impropriation is still in the said dean and chapter, who generally supply it with one of their own canons, who is licensed by the Bishop of London. The present curate is the Rev. C. R. Ashfield, who was instituted by the Dean and Chapter in 1818.

  • St. BENNETT'S, SHEREHOG]], the Churchyard of, is opposite to Size (fomerly St. Sythes) Lane, on the south side of Pancras Lane, Bucklersbury. In the &#0;???year 1323, it went by the name of St. Osyth's, subsequently corrupted to Sythes, and next to Size, from its being dedicated to a Queen and martyr of that name. But she was divested of the tutelage of this church by Benedict Shorne, a fishmonger of London, who rebuilt and otherwise benefited it. He dedicated it to the saint whose name he bore, and his surname, being corrupted into Shrog, became, subsequently, Sherehog. The ancient church shared the fate of its neighbours in 1666, and not being rebuilt, was united by act of parliament to the parish of Stephen's, Walbrook. - [see St. Stephen's, Walbrook]
  • [[BENNETT'S BUILDINGS. - 1. is in Lower Kennington Lane, the second turning on the right hand, about a furlong from Newington, on the west side of Ebenezer Place. - 2. is a turning at No. 20, Mansion House Street, Kennington Road. - 3. is in the Blackfriars' Road.
  • [[BENNET'S COURT. - 1. is a turning at No. 111, Drury Lane, opposite Russell Court. - 2. is in George Street, Bethnal Green, two doors south from Spicer Street, Brick Lane. - 3. is in White Street, Borough, the first turning on the right hand from St. George's Church towards Long Lane. - 4. is in Marigold Court, the first turning on the left from No\\'bb 370, in the Strand. - 5. is at Limehouse Causeway. - 6. is in Spicer Street, Spitalfields.
  • St. BENNET'S HILL, Upper Thames Street, is the second turning on the left hand from Earl Street, Blackfriars, and leads into Godliman Street, Doctors' Commons, and St. Paul's Churchyard. It receives its name from the Church of St. Bennet's, Paul's Wharf, which stands at its south west corner. The college of Doctors' Commons has an entrance from this hill, and the ancient college of Heralds is on its eastern side. - [see Doctors' Commons, College of, and Heralds' College]
  • [[BENNET'S PLACE. - 1. is in the Bethnal Green Road, being the first turning to the east, parallel to Pollard's Row, at the north end of Pollard Street, about half a mile on the left hand from Shoreditch. - 2. is in Bennet's Yard, Westminster, behind No. 42, Tufton Street. - 3. is in Bennett Street, Blackfriars' Road. - 4. is at No. 30, Brown's Lane, Spitalfields.
  • [[BENNET'S ROW. - 1. is on the east side of Blackfriars' Road, the second turning on the left from Surrey Chapel towards the Obelisk, leading into Gravel Lane. - 2. is in Paris Place, Chapel Street, Lisson Green, the last turning on the left from No. 23.
  • BENNET STREET, St. James's, is the first turning on the right in St. James's Street going from Piccadilly, and leads into Arlington Street.
  • BENNET STREET, Charlotte Street, Rathbone Place, is the first turning on the left hand going from Windmill Street, Tottenham Court Road; it leads into Upper Rathbone Place.
  • BENNETT STREET, Christ Church, Stepney, is the first turning north and south in Stamford Street, Blackfriars' Road, and is parallel westward to part of that road, it extends from Upper Ground Street by the bridge foot to Christ Church Yard.
  • BENNETT STREET, Westminster, is in Princes Street, the first turning on the left from Tothill Street.
  • [[BENNET'S YARD. - 1. is in Tufton Street, Westminster, at No. 41, and leads to No. 13, Marcham Street, near to St. John's Church. - 2. is in Bennett Street, Princes Street, in Tothill Street, aforesaid.
  • BENSON'S WHARF, Shad Thames, is nearly opposite to Kin&#0;???g Street, Horselydown, about two thirds of a mile eastward of London Bridge.
  • BENTINCK CHAPEL, Paddington, is an episcopal chapel in Lisson Street, Lisson Green, at the corner of Chapel Street; named after the surname of the Dukes of Portland.
  • BENTINCK CHAPEL, Mary-le-bone, another similar chapel in Bentinck Street, Welbeck Street, Cavendish Square.
  • BENTINCK MEWS, Mary-le-bone, are about a quarter of a mile on the right hand in Mary-le-bone Lane going from Oxford Street.
  • BENTINCK STREET, Mary-le-bone, goes from Welbeck Street at No. 55, and leads into Mary-le-bone Lane, nearly a quarter of a mile from Oxford Street. It is continued by Hinde Street into Manchester Square.
  • BENTINCK STREET, Berwick Street, Oxford Street, is about the middle of the west side, six houses north of Broad Street.
  • BENTLEY'S BUILDINGS, Southwark, is at the north end of Great Guildford Street, Blackman Street, near Maid Lane.
  • BENTON PLACE, Dock Head, is a few doors on the left in New Street, going from Russell Street towards Fair Street and Tooley Street.
  • BERKELEY CHAPEL, Berkeley Square, is an episcopal chapel in Charles Street, Berkeley Square.
  • BERKELEY COURT, Berkeley Street, Clerkenwell, is the second turning on the left hand going from No. 18, St. John's Lane, and about four houses on the right from Red Lion Street, in the opposite direction.
  • BERKELEY MEWS, Berkeley Street, Portman Square, are five houses westward of Portman Square, and leads to No. 5, Upper Seymour Street.
  • BERKELEY SQUARE, is a spacious Square of irregular houses, situated at the west end of Bruton Street from New Bond Street, to the south end of Davies Street from Oxford Street, and at the north end of Berkeley Street going from Piccadilly. It forms a large parallelogram, upon declivity from north to south; at the bottom or south side of which is Lansdowne House, the town mansion of the noble marquess of that name. It stands in a large well planted garden, and was originally built by the Adamses, for the Earl of Bute, the favourite minister of George III. In the centre of the plantation in the square is an equestrian statue of that King, by Wilton.
  • BERKELEY STREET, Piccadilly, is situated about the middle of the north side, and opposite the Green Park, and leads into Berkeley Square. It receives its name from being built on the site of the mansion of the Lords Berkeley of Stratton. At the west corner of this street in Piccadilly is Devonshire House, the town mansion of the Duke of Devonshire, built from the designs of Kent.
  • BERKELEY STREET, Portman Square, is the north east corner of that square, and leads into Manchester Square at No 15.
  • BERKELEY STREET, UPPER]], Portman Square is at the north west corner of that square, and leads to No. 29, Edgeware Road. It is the third on the right from Tyburn Turnpike.
  • BERKELEY STREET, West Smithfield, is at No. 18, in St. John's Lane, St. John's Street, and extends to No. 49, Red Lion Street.
  • BERKELEY STREET, Lambeth Walk, turns off at No. 20, Mill Street, and is parallel northward to Eleazer Place.
  • BERKELEY STREET, WEST]], Edgeware Road, turns off at No. 16, Connaught Terrace, nearly opposite t&#0;???o Upper Berkeley Street aforesaid.
  • BERMONDSEY BUILDINGS, Bermondsey New Road, is the second turning on the right from the Bricklayers Arms, Kent Road, going towards Bermondsey Church.
  • BERMONDSEY CHURCH YARD, is on the south side of the church, about two thirds of a mile from London Bridge down Tooley Street and Bermondsey Street. - [see St. Mary Magdalen, the Church of]
  • BERMONDSEY GROVE, Long Lane, is nearly opposite the Coach and Horses, about a furlong on the right from St. George's Church.
  • BERMONDSEY NEW ROAD, is the south continuation of Bermondsey Street, commencing at the Grange Road near the church, and leading to the Kent Road by the Bricklayers' Arms. It is about a quarter of a mile in length.
  • BERMONDSEY SQUARE, Bermondsey Churchyard, is on the south side of it, about two thirds of a mile from St. George's Church, down Long Lane.
  • BERMONDSEY STREET, Southwark, commences at Tooley Street opposite No. 63, where the numbers begin and end. It extends by the church to Long Lane, and is about half a mile in length.
  • BERMONDSEY WALL, runs parallel to the Thames, from the eastern side of St. Saviour's Dock, at Mill Street, Bermondsey, to West Street, Rotherhithe.
  • BERMONDSEY WORKHOUSE, is in Russell Street, Bermondsey, a few doors on the right hand from Bermondsey Street.
  • BERNARD STREET, Russell Square, is the first turning on the north, parallel to part of Guilford Street, and extends from Brunswick Square to Russell Square.
  • BERNER'S MEWS, Berner's Street, Oxford Street, are behind the eastern side of the street, and parallel to it. They extend from No. 6, Castle Street, to the back of No. 49, Newman Street.
  • BERNER'S STREET, Oxford Street, is about a quarter of a mile on the right from the eastern end at St. Giles's, where the numbers begin and end. It extends to Charles Street opposite the Middlesex Hospital, and is about one sixth of a mile in length.
  • BERNER'S STREET, Commercial Road, St. George's in the East, is the first turning on the right hand, past Church Lane, Whitechapel, eastward of the first mile stone from the Royal Exchange, opposite Plumber's Row.
  • BERNER'S STREET, LOWER]], St. George's in the East, turns off at No. 2, Ellen Street, Christian Street, St. George's in the East.
  • BERRY COURT, Love Lane, Wood Street, Cheapside, is at No. 6, and at the back of No. 66, Aldermanbury.
  • BERRY STREET, Clerkenwell, is the second Street parallel on the west to part of Goswell Street, and extends from No. 24, Allen Street, to Little Sutton Street.
  • BERWICK PLACE, Grange Road, Bermondsey, is the western continuation of Fort Place, and extends from the Philanthropic Reform towards the Horns.
  • BERWICK STREET, Oxford Street, is the fifth turning, or about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from Crown Street, St. Giles's, and extends from Oxford Street to Peter Street.
  • BETHEL UNION, THE RIVERMAN'S]], or British and Foreign Seamans' and Soldiers' Friend Society, or Mariners' Church. This society has a floating chapel near Wapping. It was founded in 1820. Captain Allen, R.N&#0;???., is Treasurer, and E. Phillips, Esq., Secretary.
  • BETHLEM HOSPITAL, Lambeth. This royal hospital for lunatics, is one of the five royal hospitals mentioned in the account of St. Bartholomew. It is situated in St. George's Fields, Lambeth, on a spot formerly celebrated as the Dog and Duck Tea Gardens, whence it was removed from Moorfields about fourteen years ago, having in ancient times stood on the spot now called Old Bethlem, in Bishopsgate Street.

The original building was formerly a priory founded in the year 1247, by Simon Fitzroy, of London, or, according to Stow, Simon FitzMary, Sheriff of London in the year 1247, the thirty first year of Henry III., on the east side of the Moor, near Finsbury, from which it was divided by a large and deep ditch. This priory he endowed by deed of gift, with lands not far from it, on which the street now called Old Bethlem stands. A copy of this deed may be found in the second volume of Maitland's History of London, page 796. He received from Edward III., in the fourteenth year of his reign, the grant of his licence, and protection for the brethren \\ldblquote Militia beat\\'e6 Maria de Bethlem\\rdblquote , within the City of London. They were of the order of Bethlehem, or the Star, and were distinguished by a star upon their mantles. They were subject to the visitation of the Bishop of Bethlehem, who was to be entertained with his suite whenever he came to London. It does not appear whether the society was ever very numerous, but Camden says, in his third volume (Gough's Edition), page 22, that in the year 1403, it was reduced to the master only.

At the suppression of monasteries by Henry VIII., Sir John Gresham, Lord Mayor of London, petitioned for it with success; for in 1547 the King granted its lands and revenues to the corporation of London, for the reception and maintenance of lunatics. In 1549 he followed it up by granting letters patent to John Whitehead, proctor of the hospital, to solicit and receive donations within the counties of Lincoln and Cambridge, the city of London and the Isle of Ely; and at a court of aldermen in the reign of Edward VI. it was ordered, that the precinct of Bethlem should be thenceforth united to the parish of St. Botolph Without Bishopsgate.

The number of its unfortunate patients having increased, and the ancient buildings of the priory having become much dilapidated, it was found necessary to remove it to a more spacious site, and to enlarge Its accommodations. This necessary work was begun in April 1644, and the corporation of London allotted a large piece of ground on the south side of Moorfields, on the north side of London Wall, for this purpose. The building was began and completed by voluntary contributions in 1676, at an expense of \\'a317,000. The design is said to have been copied from the palace of the Tuilleries at Paris, and that Louis XIV. was so much offended by it, that he ordered a copy of our King's palace of St. James's to be taken for offices of a very humble kind. In 1708 Queen Anne granted the corporation a license to purchase and hold in fee, or for lives, or years, or otherwise, in trust for this hospital, any lands, &c. to the value of \\'a32,000. a year. The increase of application, as there was no limitation, from all parts of the Kingdom, rendered a further enlargement necessary, therefore in 1733 two wings were added, which enabled the governors to maintain one hundred incurable patients. When these buildings were finished, the length of the hospital was 540 feet, and its breadth 40 feet.

This hospital being united by the charter of Edward VI. to that &#0;???of Bridewell, as mentioned in the account of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, it is conducted by the same governors, being members of the corporation, and others who become so by benefactions, as will be more particularly stated in the account of Bridewell, which see. The management is confided to a committee of forty two governors, seven of whom, with the treasurer, physician, and other officers, attend every Saturday in monthly rotation for the admission of patients and other business of the hospital; and these meetings are open for the attendance of any other governor.

  • [[By the agreement and act of parliament of 1782, alluded to in the account of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, the style of this hospital was settled to be \\ldblquote The Mayor, Commonalty and Citizens of London, as Masters, Guardians and Governors of the House and Hospital called Bethlem, situate without and near to Bishopsgate, of the said City of London.\\rdblquote This style is of course altered, so far as concerns its situation.

The antiquity and consequent decay of the old building in Moorfields, rendered an expensive repair, or total re-building necessary. The corporation, after due deliberation, finally determined to build a new hospital in a more proper situation; and as the leases of the Bridge House estates in St. George's Fields and Lambeth Marsh fell in at Lady day 1810, the governors agreed with the Bridge House committee a ground plot of nearly twelve acres, fronting the High Road leading from Newington to Westminster Bridge, on part of which were the house and gardens of the notoriously infamous Dog and Duck. On a portion of this ground they have erected the new hospital, from the designs and under the superintendence of the late Mr. Lewis, their architect. Of these twelve acres, eight are occupied by the hospital, its airing grounds and kitchen garden. The other four are turned to profit other ways, as the act of parliament restrains the governors to the use of eight.

This new building is of great extent and magnificence, and much more like a palace than that which is said to have excited the jealousy of Louis le Grand. It was begun in 1812, and the patients removed into it and the old hospital pulled down in 1814. The new hospital is really a magnificent structure, consisting of a centre and two wings extending along tile principal front to the length of 580 feet. The centre, which projects from the main body, has a hexastyle portico of the Ionic order, which supports a handsome pediment. The wings also project, and are in harmonious accordance with the rest of the design, and the centre is decorated by an attic surmounted by a cupola. In the great hall under the portico are preserved the two celebrated statues of raving and melancholy madness, by Caius Cibber, that were formerly on the gate piers of the late hospital in Moorfields. The buildings and inclosures are said to have cost nearly \\'a3100,000, and are capable of accommodating some hundreds of patients. Its annual income is about \\'a318,000. For further accounts of this useful institution, forms of petition for admission, &c., the reader is referred to Highmore's Pietas Londinensis, a work often quoted in the present, and to Bowen's Historical Account of Bethlem Hospital.

The present officers of the united royal hospitals of Bethlem and Bridewell are Sir Richard Carr Glyn, Bart., Alderman, President of both; Richard Clark, Esq., Chamberlain of the City, Treasurer; the Rev. Henry Budd, M.A., Chaplain; Sir G. L. Tuthill, M.D. and Edward T. Monro, M.D., Physicians; William Lawrence, Esq., Surgeon; John Poynder, Esq., Clerk and Solicitor; Mr. Thomas Hudson, Receiver; Edward Wright, M.D., Apothecary and Superintendent of Bethlem; N. Nicholls, Steward to Bethlem; Elizabeth Forbes, Matron to Bethlem; Edward Osborne, Superintendent to Bethlem; Mary Bolland, Matron to Bridewell. The present governors, fro&#0;???m the Court of Common Council, are, Mr. Samuel Dixon, for the ward of Tower; Thomas Farrance, Esq. Deputy, for Castle Baynard; Mr. Robert Elliot, for Langbourn; Mr. John Dyster, for Lime Street; Mr. William Peppercorne, for Broad Street; John Hamman, Esq. Deputy, for Cordwainers; Mr. John Platt, for Candlewick; Samuel Weddell, Esq. Deputy, for Aldgate; William Kerl, Esq. Deputy; for Cripplegate Within; Adam Oldham, Esq. Deputy, for Farringdon Within; Mr. Robert Obbard, for Farringdon Without; and Mr. Thomas Jarvis, for Queenhithe.

  • BETHLEM, OLD]], Bishopsgate Street Without, is the street mentioned in the last article as having been the original site of the ancient Priory and Hospital of Bethlem. Its name is now abandoned and changed into that of Liverpool Street, which see.
  • BETHLEM YARD, Liverpool Street, Bishopsgate Without, is a turning at the upper end of Baker's Buildings, from No. 19, Liverpool Street.
  • BETHNAL GREEN, is a village, or large green, situated about a mile to the eastward of Shoreditch, and about half a mile northward of the Turnpike at Mile End, up the Cambridge New Road, formerly called the Dog Row. Bethnal Green was formerly one of the hamlets of the large parish of Stepney, from which it was separated by act of parliament of the 13th George II. The old Roman way from London led through the hamlet, where joining the military way from the west, it passed with it to Lea Ferry, at Old Ford. In this place, Bonner, the infamous Bishop of London, had his palace, and a row of houses, altered from it, is still called Bonner's Hall. The Corporation of the Trinity House have an extensive hospital for decayed seamen in the parish. - [see Trinity Hospital]

The church built according to the provisions of that act, stands on the east side of Church Row, which extends north and south from Bethnal Green Road to Hare Street, Spitalfields, and another church built very recently by Mr. Soane, is at the south end of the green, in front of the Cambridge New Road, opposite the Dog Row. - [see St. Matthew, Bethnal Green]

The ancient mansion at the south east corner of the green, called Bethnal Green House, and used as an asylum for insane persons, is traditionally reported to have been the residence of the Blind Beggar and his Daughter, whose histories are so pathetically described in the old English ballad so named, and preserved in Bishop Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry. It was however built in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, by a citizen of London, named Kirby, and is called in the writings belonging to it, Kirby Castle.

  • BETHNAL GREEN ROAD, is the east continuation of Church Street, going from No. 65, Shoreditch; it commences at the turnpike, and extends to the green, about half a mile in length.
  • [[BETHNAL GREEN ALMS HOUSES AND SCHOOLS. Mr. Thomas Parmiter, says my excellent authority, Mr. Highmore, in his Pietas Londinensis, in the year 1722, left estates in Suffolk, which were let in 1814, at \\'a352. a year, for the purpose of building and endowing a free school and alms houses for the benefit of the hamlet of Bethnal Green; and William Lee,\\'86 by will, dated September 17, 1720, gave to his nephew, John Ham, and the trustees of the said Thomas Parmiters School, the yearly sum of \\'a310, to be paid by the wardens of the Dyers' Company; and by indenture, dated December 13, 1733, Elizabeth Carter, in consideration that the said John Ham should erect upon the piece of land therein mentioned, the alms houses and school, demised to them a piece of ground at the lower end of St. John Street, in the hamlet of Bethnal, for 600 years, at the rent of a peppercorn. The trustees, with some savings, made an advantageous purchase of a piece of ground, calle&#0;???d Cambridge Heath, in the parish, near the Hackney Road, let it on building leases for ninety five years, at a ground rent of \\'a343 a year; and have also a stock of \\'a3550 South Sea Annuities. With these funds they educate and partly clothe fifty boys. The schoolmaster has \\'a350 a year and coals; the six alms-men, \\'a35 a year each, and coals. A subscription school has been likewise established in the same parish, to which various benefactions have been given to the amount of \\'a31,200, as appears from the tables in the church. The funds are further augmented by an annual subscription and occasional charity sermons; thirty boys and thirty girls are clothed, educated, and put out apprentice. Lyson, Midx. vol. ii p. 30.

[\\'86 Report of the Parliamentary Commissioners on the Endowed Charities of London]

  • [[BETHNAL GREEN WORKHOUSE is at the east end of Hare Street, Spitalfields, about a quarter of a mile on the right from No, 10, Brick Lane.
  • BETT'S PLACE, Bett Street, Ratcliffe Highway, is four houses on the left from No. 161, Ratcliffe Highway, towards the New Road, or Back Lane.
  • BETT'S STREET, Ratcliffe Highway, turns off at No. 164, on the east side of Princes Square, and extends to No. 35, New Road, or Back Lane, about a furlong in length.
  • BEVIS MARKS, St. Mary Axe, Leadenhall Street, is at No. 30, and leads to Duke Street; it is the first Street parallel to and eastward of part of Houndsditch, and the east continuation of Camomile Street, from nearly opposite Bishopsgate Church. In this place was formerly a very large house, with several courts and gardens, which, belonging to the abbot of Bury, in Suffolk was called Burys (corruptly Bevis) Marks. This house being demolished, the ground has many houses built upon its site, and amongst the rest a Synagogue of Jews.
  • BEVIS MARK'S SCHOOL, Bevis Marks, aforesaid, was founded in the year 1731, by Isaac da Costa Villa Real, a Portuguese Jew, who also endowed it with the sum of \\'a380 a year for clothing and educating 20 Jewish girls of his nation.
  • BEVIS or BEVOIS COURT, Basinghall Street, is at No. 28, opposite the church, and is that number of houses on the right from No. 29, Cateaton Street.
  • BIBLE SOCIETIES, various. There are many of these institutions in the metropolis, all of which will be found under this head. The first in chronological order is the venerable parent of the whole, the ancient and orthodox \\ldblquote Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge\\rdblquote that was established in 1608, by members of the Church of England, tat erecting charity schools, and the distribution of religious tracts at home and abroad. This society takes an especial interest in the parochial charity schools of the metropolis, and, in their circular letters, recommend, that with their other instructions, they should add all proper methods of inuring the children to labour and industry is a recommendation that it would be wise to follow in every such instance.

The office of this institution is at No. 67. on the west side of Lincoln's Inn Fields, near the entrance of Great Queen Street. Its present officers are the Archbishop of Canterbury, President; the Venerable Archdeacon Cambridge is Treasurer for the society in general; Joseph Watson, Esq., for annual subscriptions; Henry H. Hoare, Esq., for the Protestant Mission in the East Indies; the Rev. W. Parker, M.A. and the Rev. Archibald Campbell, M.A., Joint Secretaries; Messrs. Peacock, Gatehouse and Bryant, Clerks; H. Stretton, Collector; and Messrs. C. and J. Rivington, Booksellers. 2. - Is \\ldblquote The Book Society for Promoting Religious Knowledge among the Poor,\\rdblquote established in 1750. It meets monthly at the Bank Coff&#0;???ee House, in Cornhill. Ebenezer Maitland, Esq., Treasurer; James Norton, Esq., Secretary; Mr. John Cooper, Collector, Its depository for books is at No. 19, Paternoster Row. 3. - \\ldblquote The Naval and Military Bible Society,\\rdblquote at No. 32, Sackville Street, Piccadilly, was established in 1780, for the purpose of distributing Bibles among the sailors and soldiers of his Majesty's navy and army. H.R.H. the Duke of Gloucester, is Patron; Prince Leopold and the Duke of Wellington, Vice Patrons; the Archbishops of Canterbury and York, Presidents; thirty four noblemen, bishops, baronets and officers of the royal navy and army. Vice Presidents; John Stephenson, Esq., Treasurer; J. Nisbet, Esq., Sub Treasurer; Captain J. W. Bazalgette, R. N. and Major J. M. Close, Secretaries; W. D. Skinner, Assistant Secretary; and J. Winter, Accountant and Collector. 4. - \\ldblquote The Religious Tract Society,\\rdblquote established in 1779; Joseph Reyner, Esq., 50, Mark Lane, Treasurer; the Rev. J. Hughes, M.A. and the Rev. C. T. A. Steinkopff M.A., Secretaries. 5. - \\ldblquote The Religious Tract Society,\\rdblquote 66, Paternoster Row, established in 1799, of which J. B. Wilson, Esq. is Treasurer; the Rev. W. Sibthorpe, B.B. and the Rev. C. Seboll are Secretaries. 6. - \\ldblquote The British and Foreign Bible Society, for the Diffusion of Religious Truth, by the translating, printing and publishing the Scriptures in Foreign Languages,\\rdblquote Earl Street, Blackfriars. It was instituted in 1801, and has established correspondents in many parts of Europe Asia, and America. Its officers are Lord Teignmouth, President; the Archbishop of Tuam, the Duke of Bed ford, and thirty six other prelates, nobles and members of parliament, Vice Presidents; John Thornton, Esq., Treasurer; T. P. Platt Esq., Honorary Librarian; the Rev. A Branchram, M.A., and the Rev. Joseph Hughes, M.A., Secretaries; Mr. Joseph Tarn, Accountant and Assistant Secretary; Mr. John Jackson, Assistant Foreign Secretary; Anthony Wagner, Collector. 7. - \\ldblquote The City of London Auxiliary Bible Society,\\rdblquote established in 1812; R. C. Dillon, J. Clayton and T. M. Coombs, Secretaries. 8. - \\ldblquote The North East London Bible Society,\\rdblquote established in 1812; S. Hoare, Esq., Treasurer. 9. - \\ldblquote The North West London Auxiliary Bible Society,\\rdblquote 37, Wigmore Street, Cavendish Square; the Rev. Basil Wood, Rev. J. Slatten, and C. J. Thrupp, Esq., Secretaries. 10. - \\ldblquote The Prayer Book and Homily Society,\\rdblquote 34, Salisbury Square, Fleet Street, established 1813, J. Wilson, Esq., Treasurer; the Rev. C. R. Pratchett, Secretary. 11. - \\ldblquote The Merchant Seaman's Auxiliary Bible Society,\\rdblquote Winchester House, Broad Street, Royal Exchange, established in 1818; J. Deacon, Esq., Treasurer; E. Suter and J. Truman, Esq., Secretaries.

  • BICKLEY ROW, Rotherhithe, is at the east end of Trinity Street, and leads from Russell Street towards the Surrey Canal.
  • BICKNEL'S RENTS, Southwark, is at No. 76, in Kent Street, about the middle of the north side and near one third of a mile on the left from St. George's Church.
  • BIDBOROUGH STREET, Burton Crescent, is at the back of and parallel to Tonbridge Place in the New Road.
  • BILLINGSGATE WHARF AND MARKET, Lower Thames Street, is a large square on the south side of Thames Street, between Darkhouse Lane and the new Custom House. It is a large fish market, public wharf and landing place. The earliest notice of this market or water gate is in Dr. Howel's History of the World (vol. iii. part 4, chap. 2) under the date of A. D. 979, about which time Ethelred made laws at Wantage for the regulation of the customs on ships and merchandize, to be paid at Blynesgate or Billingsgate in the Port of London, then the only quay. This little haven was for a great length of time the most important pl&#0;???ace in the metropolis for the landing of almost every article of commerce after Queenhithe was forsaken. - [see Queenhithe] But it did not become celebrated as a fish market till the year 1699, when an act of parliament was passed, making it a free port and market for the sale of fish, six days in every week, with permission to sell mackerell on Sundays, before and after divine service; and for permitting the resale of the fish purchased there in every part of the city or elsewhere by retail, but no fish monger or other person, is to engross or buy more than shall be for his own sale or use, under the penalty of \\'a320. Many scandalous abuses that had existed in this market have been recently remedied, and it is now excellently managed, under the superintendence of the Committee of City Lands, and the active yeoman or clerk of the market, Mr. Goldham, who, although the accomplished master of the ceremonies at the Lady Mayoress's Balls, is an equally efficient officer among the ladies of Billingsgate, whom he subdues by suavity and firmness, when he would not by endeavouring to equal their peculiar vocabulary.
  • [[Billingsgate Market gives its name to the ward, which is bounded on the south by the Thames, on the east by Tower Ward, on the north by Langbourn Ward, and on the west by Bridge Ward. Its principal Streets are part of Thames Street, Botolph Lane, St. Mary's Hill, Rood Lane and Pudding Lane; and its chief public buildings are the churches of St. Mary-at-Hill, St. Margaret Pattens, and St. George, Botolph Lane; and Butchers' Hall. - [see those buildings] It is divided into twelve precincts, and is governed by an alderman (Anthony Brown, Esq.), a deputy, and nine other common councilmen.
  • BILLITER SQUARE, Fenchurch Street, turns off at No. 12, on the west side of Billiter Lane, and leads into Fenchurch Street. It was anciently called Belzeter's Lane, from its first builder, but it has become corrupted to its present arbitrary name. In this square is the office of the West India Dock Company. - [see West India Docks]
  • BING STREET, Mile End Road is on the west side of Grove Road, opposite Saville Place.
  • BIRCHIN LANE, Cornhill, turns off on the south side of Cornhill, at No. 36, nearly opposite the east end of the Royal Exchange, and leads into Lombard Street.
  • [[BIRD'S BUILDINGS. - 1. is in Bennet's Row, St. George's Fields, about twelve houses on the south side near the east end, and on the right from Blackfriars' Road. - 2. is in High Street, Borough, at No. 172, leading to Court of Common Council Street by the Mint. - 3. is in Hoxton Old Town. - 4. is in Lower Street, Islington, near the green. - 5. is in Hoxton Town, about a furlong on the right from Old Street Road.
  • BIRD CAGE WALK, Bethnal Green, is the continuation of Crab Tree Row, near Shoreditch Church, and leads to the Nags Head in the Hackney Road.
  • BIRD CAGE WALK, St. James's Park, is on the south side, and extends from Buckingham Gate to Great George Street, by Storey's Gate, Westminster.
  • [[BIRD'S COURT. - 1. is in Mary-le-bone Lane about one third of a mile on the right hand from No. 158, Oxford Street, five houses beyond High Street. - 2. is in Philip Lane, Addle Street, Wood Street, Cheapside, on the west side, about the middle or ten houses from No. 9, London Wall.
  • [[BIRD IN HAND&#0;??? COURT]], Cheapside, is opposite the Old Jewry.
  • BIRD'S ROW, Blue Anchor Road, Bermondsey, is about a quarter of a mile on the right from Foot Place, Grange Road, in going towards Rotherhithe.
  • BIRD STREET, Oxford Street, turns off at Nos. 167 and 238, on both sides of the way about three quarters of a mile from St. Giles's, and leads into Henrietta Street, Manchester Square, on the north, and to No. 31, Brook Street, Grosvenor Square, on the south. The upper or northern part is generally called Bird Street, Manchester Square, and the lower, Bird Street, Grosvenor Square.
  • BIRD STREET, St. George's in the East, is the north continuation of Church Street from Wapping Church, extending to Tench Street by the London Docks.
  • BIRD STREET, Lambeth, is the continuation of South Street, West Square, commencing at the east end of Broad Street, Moor Place, and leading by a foot path to Walcot Place.
  • [[BISHOP'S COURT. - 1. is in Chancery Lane, and turns off at No. 78. It leads into Star Court and Carey Street. - 2. is in Aylesbury Street, Clerkenwell, the first turning on the left from No. 1, St. John's Street - 3. is in Old Street, St. Luke's, and is near the middle of the south side between Bunhill Row and Whitecross Street. - 4. is in Coleman Street, the second turning on the right hand, a few yards from London Wall. - 5. is in the Old Bailey, the second turning on the right from Snow Hill opposite Newgate. It leads Into Sea Coal Lane and Farringdon Street - 6. is in King's Head Court, Long Alley, Moorfields, the first turning on the right in it from Long Alley, and a few doors south from Skinner Street, Bishopsgate Without.
  • BISHOPSGATE CHURCH YARD, extends from the south side of the church, at No. 202, Bishopsgate Street opposite Houndsditch, to No. 4, New Broad Street.
  • BISHOPSGATE STREET WITHIN, is the north continuation of Gracechurch Street. It commences at Cornhill, and extends to Wormwood Street, near the church, about one fifth of a mile in length. The numbers begin and end at the southern extremity by Threadneedle Street.
  • BISHOPSGATE STREET WITHOUT, is the north continuation of the last; it extends from Camomile Street and Wormwood Street to Norton Falgate. Its total length is about half a mile. This street gives its name to the ward in which it is situate, and derives its own from the ancient gate that formerly stood across the street, a little northward of Wormwood Street and Camomile Street. Its site is still marked by a sculptured mitre against the house. Strype, the historian, imagines that Bishops Gate was erected by Erkenwald, Bishop of London, about the year 675, a conjecture founded only on the effigies of two bishops, sculptured on the ancient gate. Stow, however, could find no mention of this gate earlier than 1210, when William Blound, one of the Sheriffs of London, sold his land and gardens without Bishopsgate to the wardens of London Bridge.

As Bishopsgate Street escaped the ravages of the great fire in 1666, there are several remains of the ancient domestic architecture of England; particularly Crosby Hall, in Crosby Square (which see), a house once Sir Paul Pindar's, at the corner o&#0;???f Half Moon Alley, and some others. The celebrated White Hart Tavern, near the church, has been recently pulled down, and a handsome modern brick structure erected in its stead. The south end of the street was destroyed by fire in 1766, and the present houses from Cornhill to the church, by Threadneedle Street, erected. Among them is the celebrated London Tavern, the exterior of which does by no means correspond with the elegance and comfort of the interior; but the proprietor, perhaps, assures himself with the proverb, that \\ldblquote good wine needs no bush.\\rdblquote

  • [[Bishopsgate Ward, as well as the street, takes its name from its ancient gate. It is bounded on the south by the Ward of Langbourn, on the west by that of Broad Street, on the east by those of Aldgate and Portsoken, and part of the liberty of the Tower, and on the north by the parish of Shoreditch, being itself the most northern of the city wards. The principal buildings in this ward, are the parish churches of St. Botolph Without Bishopsgate, St. Ethelburga, and Great St. Helens; Leathersellers' Hall, the Excise Office, and the London Workhouse. - [see all these several places] The ward is governed by an alderman (Thomas Copeland, Esq.), and two deputies, one for the part with out, and the other for the part within the gate; and twelve other common councilmen, nine for the part within, and three for the part without.
  • BISHOPSGATE PAROCHIAL CHARITY SCHOOLS for the parish of St. BOTOLPH, are in Bishopsgate Street Without They have existed ever since 1702, and are supported by voluntary subscriptions, collections at sermons, the dividends of \\'a34,600, navy five per cents, purchases from legacies left for the support of the school, and savings of income; a ground rent of \\'a310. a year from two houses in Artillery Lane, and the rent of five acres of land near the town of Selsoe, in Bedfordshire. There are now 60 boys and 60 girls clothed and educated in these schools on the National System. For other particulars the reader is referred to the parliamentary reports on the endowed charities of the city of London, from which authentic documents this and other similar portions of my work are taken.
  • BISHOPSGATE POORHOUSE, Rose Alley, is a few yards on the left from No. 34, Bishopsgate Without, near New Street.
  • BISHOPSGATE WORKHOUSE, Dunning's Alley, Bishopsgate Without, is a few yards on the left from No. 161, near Sun Street.
  • BISHOP'S WALK, Lambeth, is a footpath by the side of the Thames, under the walls of the Archbishop of Canterbury's palace. It extends from Lambeth Church to near Westminster Bridge, about half a mile in length.
  • BISHOP'S YARD, Charles Street, Grosvenor Square, is a few yards on the left from the south east corner of the square in going towards Mount Street.
  • BITT ALLEY, Turnmill Street, Clerkenwell, is the first turning on the left from Clerkenwell Green towards Smithfield.
  • [[BLACK BIRD ALLEY. - 1. is in St. John's Street, Bethnal Green, and is the second turning on the right from Brick Lane, leading to Spicer Street, Spitalfields. - 2. is in Spicer Street, Brick Lane, aforesaid.
  • BLACK BEAR COURT, Piccadilly, turns off at No. 13, the east end leading to No. 21, Titchborne Street.
  • [[BLACK BOY ALLEY or LANE. - 1. is at No. 206, High Street, Poplar, about half a mile on the left from the C&#0;???ommercial Road, opposite the Harrow public house; it leads to England Row and Meeting House Place. - 2. is in Blackman Street, Southwark. - 3. is in Fore Street, Lambeth, near the church. - 4. is in Lower West Street, formerly Chick Lane, Smithfield, the last turning on the right before coming to Field Lane.
  • BLACK BULL ALLEY, Whitechapel, is about a furlong on the right up Middlesex Street, formerly Petticoat Lane, from No. 41, Aldgate High Street; or from Whitechapel about ten houses south from Wentworth Street, and leads into Goulston Street.
  • BLACKBURN MEWS, Grosvenor Square, are at No. 53, Upper Brook Street, the first turning on the left from Grosvenor Square.
  • BLACK COAT ALMS HOUSES, Little Chapel Street, Westminster, also called Farmer's Alms Houses, after the name of the founder, adjoins the western side of St. Margaret's burial ground, about a quarter of a mile from Buckingham Gate.
  • BLACK CROW ALLEY, Whitecross Street, St. Luke's is at the corner of Banner Street, Cripplegate.
  • BLACK DOG ALLEY, College Street, Westminster, is the third turning on the left from No. 18, Abingdon Street, the corner of Bowling Street.
  • BLACK DOG ALLEY, Shoreditch, is a few houses to the northward of Worship Street, or Hog Lane.
  • BLACK EAGLE STREET, Spitalfields, is opposite No. 65, Brick Lane, by Hanbury's Brewery. It leads to Gray Eagle Street.
  • BLACK'S COURT, Phoenix Street, Spitalfields, is the first turning on the right, and about six doors from No. 39, Wheeler Street, leading into Quaker Street.
  • BLACKFRIARS, the district so called, is situated between Ludgate Hill and the River Thames. It was formerly a monastery of Dominicans, called the Convent of the Black Friars, or Friar preachers, founded about the year 1276, by Robert Kilwarby, Archbishop of Canterbury, by licence from Edward I. It was built with the stones taken from the Tower of Mount Fitchet, and from a part of the city wall, that was pulled down to make way for the new building. This produced an order from the King to the citizens of London, to build a new wall with a tower at the head of it for his reception, this wall run from Ludgate westward, behind the houses on Ludgate Hill to the Fleet Ditch, and thence southward to the river Thames; for the completion of which works his majesty granted the city a duty on certain merchandize.

Edward I. and his Queen Eleanor were great benefactors to the new convent, and by their aid the archbishop erected the monastery, a fine mansion and a large church. He kept his charters and records here, and in its time the precinct was crowded with habitations of the nobility. The priory church was very large, and in it were held several parliaments and other great meetings. In 1529 the Cardinals Campeius and Wolsey sat here to annul the marriage of Henry VIII. with Catharine of Arragon; and in the month of October in the same year, the parliament which condemned Wolsey in a pr\\'e6munire assembled here. This precinct was very extensive, and was surrounded by a wall with four gates, and contained a great number of shops, the occupiers of which were allowed to carry on their trades, although not free of the city. These privileges were maintained, even after the dissolution of the monasteries, for when the Lord Mayor interfered in behalf of his freemen, Henry VIII. sent him word, that he was as well able to keep the liberties of the precinct as the Friars were; and in the reign of Queen Mary the citizens again made a f&#0;???ruitless application to parliament, to grant them jurisdiction over the Blackfriars precinct.

In the fourth year of his reign Edward VI. granted the whole monastery, with all its lands and tenements, to Sir Thomas Cawarden. After this time the inhabitants fitted up a portion of the church for their parochial use, with various alterations, till it was completely destroyed by the great fire in 1666, when the present church was erected in its stead. - [see St. Anne's, Blackfriars, the Church of] Within this ancient precinct also stands, on the east side of Water Lane, the hall, warehouses, and offices of the Apothecaries Company. - [see Apothecaries' Hall]

In consequence of the inhabitants of this precinct claiming, in the year 1735, a privilege of exemption from the jurisdiction of the City of London, in right of the ancient monastery being dissolved there by Henry VIII., the Lord Mayor and Aldermen determined to ascertain their right thereto, which they did by a trial in the Court of King's Bench, on the 10th July, of that year. John Bosworth, Esq., Chamberlain of the City, was plaintiff, and Daniel Watson, shalloon and drugget seller, defendant. The action was brought against the latter, for opening a shop in Blackfriars, and retailing his goods there without being a freeman of the city. The counsel for the plaintiff alleged that Blackfriars actually belonged to the City of London, when it was a monastery, and before trades were ever used there. To prove this allegation they produced several ancient records, namely, a charter of King Edward I.,\\'86 and a record of the 2nd of Richard II., calling it \\ldblquote the Friary of London;\\rdblquote and another of the 21st of Henry VIII., dated November 3, 1530, mentioning a parliament held at the Friars, preachers of the City of London, and other records of a similar nature. They likewise cited a parallel case to this in the 15th Charles I., when an action was brought against one Philpot, a shoemaker of Blackfriars, for opening a shop and vending shoes there, without being free of the City. The result was that after a fair trial, by an equal and indifferent jury, taken from the county of Herts., a verdict was given for the plaintiff, with five shillings damages. In consequence of this decision, Blackfriars became one of the precincts of the ward of Farringdon Within, and sends two members as its representatives in the Court of Common Council. - [see Farringdon Within, the Ward of]

[\\'86 See Norton's Commentaries, Art. Charters of the City of London]

  • BLACKFRIARS' ALMS HOUSES, Blackfriars, are a few doors on the left in Church Entry, Shoemaker's Row, the second turning on the left westward of Creed Lane.
  • BLACKFRIARS BRIDGE, unites the two shores of the City of London in Middlesex, and in Surrey, from the south end of New Bridge Street, at Chatham Place, to a corresponding square on the Surrey side, called Albion Place. - [see those two places] The first proposition for building a bridge over this part of the Thames, was made in the Court of Common Council in the year 1753, when there were only two bridges over the Thames in the metropolis; namely, those called Westminster and London.

The corporation therefore procured an act of parliament in 1756, by which they were empowered to build this bridge, and to perform all other necessary acts for its accomplishment. They proposed a competition, and selected the design of Robert Mylne, Esq., a young architect, who was then pursuing his studies in Rome.

This bridge is erected on piles, the first of which was driven under one of the centre piers, on the 7th of June 1760, by the Lord Mayor, Sir Thomas Chitty, who deposited, as is usual on such occasions, a series of coins and a pla&#0;???te, on which was engraved a Latin inscription commemorative of the circumstances and of the public virtues of William Pitt, the first Earl of Chatham, after whom the bridge was named Pitt Bridge, and the quadrangle at its northern foot, Chatham Place. This inscription called forth a critical squib entitled \\ldblquote City Latin; or Critical and Political Remarks on the Latin Inscription on laying the First Stone of the intended New Bridge, at Blackfriars\\rdblquote which went through several editions. It was answered by \\ldblquote Plain English, in answer to City Latin, &c., by a Deputy.\\rdblquote Both the pamphlets are in the library of the Corporation at Guildhall.

  • [[Blackfriars' Bridge was opened to the public in 1770, with a series of tolls, but the toll houses were burnt by the rioters in 1780. It consists of nine elliptical arches, the piers of which are decorated by Ionic columns, of various heights, and the upper part by a cornice and balustrade. The bridge is in a very dilapidated state, and must shortly undergo a very expensive repair. The custody of the bridge is at present in the committee for general purposes, under whom James Montague, Esq. is the Surveyor. For further information on this subject, the reader is referred to Britton and Pugin's Public Buildings of the Metropolis, my work of London in the 19th century, the various modern histories of London, &c.
  • BLACKFRIARS' GATEWAY, Ludgate Street, is a turning nearly opposite St. Martin's Church, and leads through Pilgrim Street to the Broadway.
  • BLACKFRIARS' ROAD, commences at the south end of Blackfriars' Bridge, and extends to the Obelisk by the Surrey Theatre. It is about two thirds of a mile in length.
  • BLACKFRIARS' SCHOOL, is a charitable institution, founded by Peter Joy, Esq., in the year 1716, who also endowed it with \\'a3160 17s. 3d. a year for clothing and instructing 40 boys and 30 girls in reading, writing, and arithmetic. He left it under the trusteeship of the Governors of Sion College. This gentleman also by will, dated June 24, 1718, left two freehold houses in Ram Alley, Fleet Street, for the use of the poor of St. Anne's, Blackfriars, the full particulars of which are in the Parliamentary Reports on the Endowed Charities of the City of London.
  • [[BLACK HORSE COURT. - 1. is in Fleet Street, four doors on the right hand from Farringdon Street, at No. 109, and leads by an angular turning into the said street, between Nos. 90 and 91. St. Bride's parish watch house and committee room are up this place on the right, going from Fleet Street. - 2. is at No. 179, in the Kent Road. - 3. is at No. 140, Aldersgate Street. - 4. is at No. 6, George Street, Wentworth Street, Spitalfields. - 5. is in the Haymarket.
  • [[BLACK HORSE SQUARE. - 1. is in the Deptford Lower Road, the first turning on the left beyond the three mile stone from London Bridge. - 2. is at No. 34, Aldgate High Street.
  • [[BLACK HORSE YARD. - 1. is in the Haymarket, the second turning on the right from Piccadilly. - 2. is in the Broadway or Chapel Street, Westminster, two doors on the left from the west end of Tothill Street. - 3. is in Tottenham Court Road, at No. 19, on the left near Oxford Street, leading into Gresse Street and Rathbone Place. - 4. is in Rathbone Place, six houses on the right hand from Oxford Street, and near to St. Giles's. - it is in Newton Street, St. Giles's, the first turning on the left from the end of Holborn. - 6. is in Goswell Street, a few doors north from Long Lane. - 7. is in Aldgate High Street, about one sixth of a mile on the left from Leadenhall Street, a &#0;???few doors west; it leads into Middlesex Street, formerly Petticoat Lane. - 8. is in George Yard, Whitechapel, the first turning on the left from Whitechapel, near the church. - 9. is in Kent Street, Borough, about one third of a mile on the right from St. George's Church. - 10. is in Union Buildings, Leather Lane, Holborn, a few yards from opposite No. 36, Leather Lane. - 11. is in Dean Street, Soho, the first turning on the left from No. 400, Oxford Street. - 12. is at No. 52, Gray's Inn Lane, on the right hand from Holborn. - 13. is in Bartholomew close, the second turning on the left horn No. 56, West Smithfield.
  • BLACKLAND'S KING'S ROAD, Chelsea,is opposite Whitelands, at the back of the nursery ground, the second coach turning on the right from Sloane Square towards Fulham.
  • BLACKLAND'S LANE, Chelsea, is the continuation of the last to Brompton, by the Marlborough Tavern.
  • BLACKLAND'S PLACE, Chelsea, is nearly opposite Symond's Street, going from the north west corner of Sloane Square.
  • [[BLACK LION COURT. - 1. is in Tooley Street, and turns off at No. 81, on the east side of Morgan's Lane, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand, going from London Bridge. It leads into Green Bank, Southwark. - 2. is at No. 3, Berwick Street, Soho, the last turning on the left from No. 373, Oxford Street.
  • BLACK LION YARD, Whitechapel Road, is the second turning on the left hand, a few doors below the church, leading into Old Montague Street.
  • BLACKMAN'S MEWS, Upper Brook Street, Grosvenor Square, turns off at No. 64, and leads to No. 5, Upper Grosvenor Street.
  • BLACKMAN STREET, Southwark, is the south continuation of the Borough High Street, extending from St. George's Church to the Stones End, Newington Causeway, by the King's Bench Prison. It is about a quarter of a mile in length.
  • BLACKMORE STREET, Clare Market, is the continuation westward of Clare Street from the market, and extends from Stanhope Street to No. 100, Drury Lane.
  • BLACK PRINCE ROW, Walworth, is a part of the High Street, or Road, a few houses on the left hand southward of the Elephant and Castle.
  • [[BLACK RAVEN COURT. - 1. is in Seething Lane, Tower Street, the first turning on the right from Tower Street. - 2. is in Leadenhall Street, about three houses on the left hand going from Aldgate.
  • BLACKSMITHS' ARMS COURT, is the first turning on the left in Blacksmiths' Arms Place, from Church Lane, Whitechapel.
  • BLACKSMITHS' HALL, Lambeth Hill, Doctors' Commons. The site of this ancient structure is on the west side of the above named hill, but having gone to decay, it is let by the company as a warehouse. The worshipful Company of Blacksmiths, and a more useful craft is hardly known, was very anciently a guild or fraternity by prescription, in which state it continued till the reign of Queen Elizabeth, in the year 1571, when they obtained a charter of incorporation, by the name of \\ldblquote The&#0;??? Keepers or Wardens and Society of the Art and Mystery de les Blacksmith's of London,\\rdblquote which was confirmed by James I. This company is governed by a master, three wardens, and twenty-one assistants. It is the fortieth on the city list. Since the company has relinquished the use of its hall on Lambeth Hill, the business is conducted at Cutler's Hall.
  • [[BLACK SWAN ALLEY. - 1. is in Market Street, St. James's, four houses on the right hand from No. 117, Jermyn Street. - 2. is in London Wall, about a dozen houses eastward of Coleman Street.
  • BLACK SWAN COURT, is in Golden Lane, St. Luke's, about the middle of the east side, and opposite Ball Yard. - 2. is in St. Paul's Churchyard, at No. 21, on the south side; it leads to No. 7, Little Carter Lane, Doctors' Commons. - 3. is in Great Tower Street, six houses on the left, eastward of Mark Lane.
  • [[BLACK SWAN YARD. - 1. is in Bermondsey, about the middle of the east side of Bermondsey Street, about twenty houses on the left below Crucifix Lane. - 2. is in Cross Street, Newington, and is the first turning on the right from the church towards Walworth.
  • BLACKWALL, is a hamlet in the parish of All Saints, Poplar, is situated at the eastern extremity of that parish, and is remarkable for the number and excellence of its taverns, particularly that recently built by Mr. S. Lovegrove, and called the West India Dock Tavern. Also as being the eastern extremity of the West India Docks, and of the City Canal, as well as having the valuable property of the East India Docks within its limits. Its original name is said to have been Bleak Wall, from its exposed situation on the artificial bank or wall of the Thames. - [see City Canal, East India Docks, and West India Docks]
  • BLACKWALL BASIN, is at the eastern end of the West India Docks, and connects them with the River Thames.
  • BLACKWALL CAUSEWAY, commences at the east end of Poplar by Naval Row, and extends to the river Thames.
  • BLACK AND WHITE COURT, Old Bailey, is about the middle of the west side, but is more, generally called New Court.
  • BLACKWOOD ALLEY, Spitalfields, is in Fleet Street, the first Street parallel to St. John Street, Brick Lane, from George Street to Fleet Street Hill.
  • BLAKE'S ALMS HOUSES, Vauxhall, are on the south side, a few yards on the right on the Wandsworth Road.
  • [[BLAKE'S COURT. - 1. is in Catherine Street, Strand, about six houses on the left hand from No. 343, Strand. - 2. is in Old Gravel Lane, near the middle of the west side.
  • BLAND'S BUILDINGS, Bell Alley, Goswell Street, is the first turning on the left from No. 12, Goswell Street, leading to French Alley.
  • BLAND'S COURT, Great Wild Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, is the second turning on the right, and about fourteen houses from Great Queen Street, opposite Wild Court.
  • BLANDFORD MEWS, Blandford Street, Mary-le-bone, are in Manchester Square, four doors eastward of Baker Street, leading to Dorset Street.
  • BLANDFORD PLACE, Pall Mall, turns off at No. 83, near Marlborough House, now occupied by Prince Leopold. It derives its name from one of the titles of the Duke of Marlborough.
  • BLANDFORD PLACE, Regent's Park, turns out of the New Road into Dorset Square.
  • BLANDFORD STREET, Manchester Square, turns off at No. 47, Manchester Street, and leads into Baker Street, Portman Square.
  • BLEEDING HEART YARD, Charles Street, Hatton Garden, turns off at No. 20, at the north end of Union Court from No. 95, Holborn Hill.
  • BLENHEIM MEWS, Blenheim Street, Oxford Street, is the first turning on either the right or left from No. 351, Oxford Street.
  • BLENHEIM STREET, Oxford Street, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand, going from St. Giles's and leading into Great Marlborough Street
  • BLENHEIM STREET, New Bond Street, is seven houses from No. 307, Oxford Street, and leads into Woodstock Street.
  • BLEWET'S BUILDINGS, Fetter Lane, are about fifteen houses on the left, going from Holborn Hill towards Fleet Street.
  • BLIND, INSTITUTION FOR THE RELIEF OF INDIGENT JEWS. - [see Jews' Charitable Institutions]
  • BLIND, SCHOOL FOR THE INDIGENT]], is in St. George's Fields, on the south side of the Obelisk by the Surrey Theatre, and occupying the end of the London and Westminster Bridge Roads. Of institutions like this, Dr. Lettsom observed, that \\ldblquote he who enables a blind person, without excess of labour, to earn his own livelihood, does him more real service than if he had pensioned him to a greater amount.\\rdblquote

This excellent charitable institution was established in 1799, by Thomas Beddington, Samuel Bosanquet, jun., James Ware and William Houlston, Esqs. They commenced their laudable work in the house and rooms that were formerly the Dog and Duck Tea Gardens, and when that site was required for the New Bethlem Hospital they agreed for an allotment of about two acres on the present site. The front elevation occupies about sixty feet in front next the road, and runs behind the wall of the Philanthropic Institution in the London Road, on the one side, and the houses on the other.

The object of this institution is to instruct blind persons of either sex in such trades, as they may be able to provide, either wholly or partly, for their own subsistence. The articles manufactured by these unfortunate persons, are, shoe-makers thread, fine and coarse thread for other purposes, sash and clothes' lines, of a peculiar construction and made with machines, adapted to the use of blind persons, by the females; and sash and clothes' lines, hampers and wicker baskets, rough and white bear mats and fine mats by the males. Some of them also do bookbinding and other handicrafts.

The pupils are only kept in the school till they have attained a sufficient knowledge and practice in their trade, which is, on an average, about three years. They are then discharged to make room for others, with a portion of their earnings by way of encouragement, and a set of tools. The manner of applying for admission and other interesting particulars relative to this charity maybe found in Highmore's Pietas Londinensis, p. 614; and proper forms, &c., may be had of the secretary.

The present officers are, the Archbishop of Canterbury, President; the Marquess of Stafford, Earl Spencer, the Bishop of London and eight other distinguished personages, are the Vice Presidents; Samuel Bosanquet, Esq., Treasurer; the Rev. Isaac Jackman, M.A., Chaplain; Charles Dodd, Esq., No. 5, Billiter Street, Secretary; William Back, M.D.) Physician; Martin Ware, Esq., Consulting Surgeon; Henry J. Sterry, Esq., Surgeon and Apothecary; Mr. Rob&#0;???ert Sharp, Superintendent of the School; Mrs. Cox, Housekeeper; Messrs. William Davis, Canterbury Place, and J. Ruddock, Brighton, Collectors.

  • BLINKFORD'S BUILDINGS, Shoreditch, is in King John's Court, the first turning on the right from No. 13, Holywell Lane.
  • BLISSETT STREET, Bethnal Green Road, turns off at No. 6, Punderson's Place, on the north side, near the green.
  • BLOCKS COURT, Spitalfields, is in Phoenix Street, six houses on the right from No. 38, Wheeler Street.
  • BLOMFIELD STREET, Finsbury, named after the present Lord Blomfield, turns off at No. 28, London Wall, into Finsbury Circus.
  • BLOMBERG STREET, named after the Rev. D. Blomberg, one of George the Fourth's domestic chaplains, is in the Vauxhall Bridge Road, Pimlico.
  • [[BLOOMSBURY. The district so called on the north of Holborn, was anciently a village named Lomsbury, of which its present name is evidently a corruption. The royal stables were situated within its precincts till they were destroyed by fire in 1354.
  • [[BLOOMSBURY CHURCH. - [see St. George's, Bloomsbury]
  • BLOOMSBURY COURT, High Holborn, leads from No. 136, on the north side, into Bloomsbury Market.
  • BLOOMSBURY DISPENSARY, Great Russell Street, is situated on the south side of that street, at No. 62, nearly opposite the British Museum. This institution was formed in 1801, for the relief of the sick poor, and for vaccination, in the populous district of Bloomsbury. Patients are received, as usual in dispensaries, by recommendatory letters from governors; and indigent persons requiring vaccination, and all casualties, are received without such letters. The limits of this dispensary extend, eastward, as far as Gray's Inn Lane; southward, from Middle Row, Holborn, by way of Lincoln's Inn Fields to Great Queen Street and Long Acre; westward, from Newport Market, in a line from the bottom of Dean Street, Soho, to Newman Street, Cleveland Street, and Fitzroy Square; and northward, along the New Road, by Somers Town, to the end of Gray's Inn Lane.

Its present officers are, the Duke of Bedford, Patron; the Marquis of Huntley, President; the Marquis of Tavistock, Viscount Sidmouth, Lord John Russell, and nine other noblemen and gentlemen. Vice Presidents; Stephen Hough and Thos. Taylor, Esqs., Treasurers; George Pinckard, M.D., Physician; Samuel Cooper, Esq., Surgeon; Mr. William Miller, Apothecary; and J. Pasmore, Esq., Secretary.

  • BLOOMSBURY MARKET, is at the north end of Lyon Street, Holborn, five doors up from No. 143, High Holborn.
  • BLOOMSBURY PLACE, Bloomsbury Square, extends from the north east corner of the square to Upper King Street, Holborn.
  • BLOOMSBURY SQUARE, is situated at the north end of Southampton Street, High Holborn, and the east end of Great Russell Street, from Tottenham Court Road and Oxford Street. It was formerly called Southampton Square, and contains some good houses, a handsome plantation in the centre, and a bronze statue of Charles Fox, by Westmacott. The whole of the north side, and Bedford Row, as far northward as Russell Square, was formerly occupied by Bedford House, the magnificent town mansion of the Duke of Bedford, built by Inigo Jones.
  • BLOSSOM'S STREET, Spitalfields, is the first turning on the left hand in White Lion Street, from No. 13, Norton Falgate.
  • BLOSSOM'S TERRACE, Spitalfields, turns off at No. 13, Blossom's Street, above mentioned.
  • [[BLUE ANCHOR ALLEY. - 1. is in Brook Street, Ratcliffe, at No. 106, nearly opposite Stepney Causeway. - 2. is in Maid Lane, Southwark, the fifth turning on the left from No. 59, New Park Street, by the Borough Market, and nearly opposite Horse Shoe Alley, Bankside. - 3. is in Bunhill Row, St. Luke's about one seventh of a mile on the left from Chiswell Street, leading to Whitecross Street. - 4. is in Middlesex Street, formerly Petticoat Lane, Whitechapel. - 5. is in York Street, Westminster. - 6. is in Tooley Street.
  • [[BLUE ANCHOR COURT. - 1. is in Maid Lane, Borough, the first turning westward from Blue Anchor Alley, by Castle Lane. - 2. is in Great Peter Street, Westminster, at the west end, the second turning on the right from Strutton Ground, near the Horse Ferry Road. - 3. is in Blue Anchor Alley, Bunhill Row, about the middle of the north side. - 4. is in Brook Street, Ratcliffe, the continuation of the before mentioned Blue Anchor Alley.
  • BLUE ANCHOR LANE, Bermondsey, is a turning that leads from the Blue Anchor public house to the Gregorian Arms, on the east side of the Spa, and near Jamaica Row, Mill Pond Bridge, Rotherhithe. It is about a third of a mile in length.
  • BLUE ANCHOR LANE, Bethnal Green, commences near the north east corner of the green, and leads to the Hackney Road.
  • BLUE ANCHOR ROAD, Bermondsey, is the east continuation of the Grange Road, commencing at the turnpike, by Fort Place, and leading, by the Blue Anchor and Jamaica Level, to Mill Pond Bridge, Rotherhithe.
  • [[BLUE ANCHOR YARD. - 1. is in Gardiner's Lane, Westminster, the middle of the east side, about twelve houses southwards from the middle of York Street. - 2. is in Coleman Street, near London Wall. - 3. is in Rosemary Lane, on the south side, about a furlong on the right from Tower Hill, and leads towards Upper East Smithfield.
  • [[BLUE BALL COURT. - 1. is in Lant Street, Southwark, at the west end, nearly opposite King Street, in the Mint. - 2. is in Tottenham Court Road, by Goodge Street, about a quarter of a mile on the left from St. Giles's.
  • BLUE BALL YARD, St. James's Street, is on the right from 163, Piccadilly.
  • BLUE BOAR INN, Aldgate, is a few doors on the left from Leadenhall Street.
  • [[BLUE BOAR YARD. - 1. is in High Holborn, the first turning westward of Red Lion Street, and leads into Eagle Street. - 2. is at No. 81, Court of Common Council Street, Southwark.
  • BLUE COAT SCHOOL, Westminster, is situated at the east end of James Street, and at the west end of Little Chapel Street, Buckingham Gate. In the large and populous parish of St. Margaret's, Westminster, there are, besides the usual parochial charity schools, three establishments for the support and education of poor children, by distinct charters and endowments, namely, the Blue Coat, the Green Coat, and the Gray Coat Hospitals. - [see Green Coat Hospital and Gray Coat Hospital]

The Blue Coat Hospital was instit&#0;???uted in the year 1688, and claims to be the first in point of precedence in date after the decisive revolution of that year, and the expulsion of Popery and intolerance. In 1714, a school for girls was added, and in 1814, according to Mr. Highmore, there were 62 boys and 34 girls upon the foundation, the boys are taught reading, writing and arithmetic, and the girls the same, with knitting, needle work and household work, so as to render them useful as domestic servants. They are clothed and supplied with every necessary, and when they are of a fit age they are bound apprentice. The chief qualification for admittance into the school is, that they must, at the time of admission, be resident within the parish of St. Margaret; for which purpose application must be made to the rector and churchwardens of the parish, to the trustees of the school, or to the master at the school house.

  • BLUE COAT BUILDINGS, Butcher Hall Lane, is the continuation of that lane, entering at No. 82, Newgate Street, and extending horn the corner of Bull and Mouth Street under the archway into Little Britain. It derives its name from its contiguity to the Blue Coat School or Christ's Hospital.
  • BLUE COURT, Great Saffron Hill, is a few houses on the left in Red Lion Court, from No. 11, Great Saffron Hill.
  • BLUE CROSS STREET, Whitcomb Street, is opposite James Street, from No. 17, Haymarket, the second turning on the right from Charing Cross, leading to Grange Street and Hemming's Row.
  • BLUE GATE COURT, Ratcliffe Highway, is at the north end of Blue Gate Fields.
  • BLUE GATE FIELDS, Ratcliffe Highway, are the first turning on the left east of St. George's Church, and leads into Back Lane.
  • BLUE HART COURT, Little Bell Alley, is the second turning on the right from Leathersellers' Buildings, London Wall.
  • BLUE HOUSES, Lambeth Marsh. - 1. are at the second turning on the left in the New Cut from Surrey Chapel towards the Coburg Theatre. - 2. are a few houses opposite the last, before the second turning on the right from Surrey Chapel towards Westminster Bridge, between the Horn Brewery and the Patent Shot Manufactory.
  • BLUE LAST COURT, Limehouse, turns off at No. 31, Three Colt Street, on the east side of Limehouse Church.
  • BLUE LION COURT, Aldersgate Street, is six doors on the right hand northward of Falcon Square.
  • BLUE POSTS' COACH OFFICE, Tottenham Court Road, is at the corner of Hanway Yard, about twelve houses on the left from Oxford Street.
  • BLUE POSTS' COACH OFFICE, Holborn Bars, is six houses eastward of Middle Row, on the right, or about a quarter of a mile on the left from Farringdon Street in the opposite direction.
  • BLUNDEN'S COURT, Southwark, turns off at No. 298 in Kent Street, the end of Unicorn Court.
  • BLUNDERBUSS COURT, Kingsland Road, is a few doors on the left hand beyond Shoreditch Church, at the back of the Spread Eagle.
  • BOARD OF CONTROL FOR THE AFFAIRS OF INDIA, is at the large building on the south side of Cannon Row, Westminster, originally built for the Ordnance Office, by William Atkinson, Esq. The Ionic portico of this chaste and fine building is one of the best proportioned and best applied in the metropolis.

The business of this board&#0;??? is explained by its name. Its present officers are, Lord Ellenborough, President; the Duke of Wellington, the Earl of Aberdeen, the Rt. Hon. Sir Robert Peel, Bart., the Rt. Hon. Sir George Murray, the Rt. Hon. Henry Goulburn, Lord Ashley, M.P., the Rt. Hon. Thomas Courtnay, M.P., Marquis Graham, Rt. Hon. John Sullivan and George Bankes, Esqs., M.P., Commissioners; the Rt. Hon. John Stuart Wortley, M.P., Secretary; Benjamin J. Jones, Esq., Assistant Secretary; five Senior Clerks, six Assistant Clerks, twelve Junior Clerks; William Leach, Esq., Senior Clerk in the Department of Accounts; William Groom, Esq., Solicitor; the Hon. Henry S. Law, Private Secretary to the President; Henry Jadis, Esq., Clerk of the Home Department; Henry Robin son, Esq., Librarian and Keeper of the Papers; Mr. John Moore, Assistant Do.; a House-keeper, a Chamber-keeper, three Messengers, and a Porter.

  • BOARD OF GREEN CLOTH, St. James's Palace, is a court of justice which is supposed to be continually sitting in the King's house. It is under the control of the Lord Steward of the King's household, and is composed of the treasurer of the household, the cofferer, the master of the household, two clerks of the Green Cloth, and two clerks comptrollers. Its name is derived from a Green cloth spread over the table at which the members sit. This court has power to determine treasons, felonies, and other crimes committed within the verge of the court. It pays the wages of the King's servants above and below stairs, and the bills for the provisions, the expenses of the department of the master of the Horse, and other similar duties.

Its present officers are, the Earl of Jersey, Lord Steward of the Household; the Rt. Hon. Sir William Freemantle, Treasurer; Lord George Thomas Beresford, Comptroller; Sir Frederick B. Watson, Master of the Household; \\emdash \\emdash , Deputy Comptroller; three clerks, messengers, a porter, and other menials.

  • [[BOARD OF COUNCIL FOR TRADE AND FOREIGN PLANTATIONS. The office of this important board is held in the new buildings by Mr. Soane, at Whitehall, of which a full description is given in my work of London in the nineteenth century. The duties of this office are conducted by a board or council of commissioners, whose business is to examine into the state of the import and export trade of the country, in order to advise the government as to their proper regulations. Also to encourage our plantations and colonies, and they sit also as a court of justice, and appeals relative to all cases connected with the trade and colonies of the country. The Right Hon. John Charles Herries, M.P., is Chief Commissioner and President of the Board; the Right Hon. Thomas Peregrine Courtnay, M.P., Vice President; the Lord Chancellor, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the First Lord of the Treasury, the principal Secretaries of State, the Speaker of the House of Commons, the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, the Paymaster of the Forces, the Treasurer of the Navy, the Master of the Mint, and officers of state in Ireland, being Privy Councillors, are Commissioners ex officio; and Sir John Nicholl, and the Right Hon. Charles Arbuthnot, Commissioners non official; James Buller and Charles C. F. Greville, Esqrs., Secretaries.
  • BOARD OF WORKS AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS, HIS MAJESTY'S. This board has the management of all the public works and buildings belonging to the government. It is under the management of Benjamin Charles Stephenson, Esq., Surveyor General; Henry Hake Seward, Esq., Assistant Surveyor General and Cashier; John William Hiort, Chief Examiner; John Phipps, Drawing and Measuring Clerk; two assistant examiners and drawing clerks, two engrossing and copying clerks, and a clerk for the supply of furniture. John Nash, John Soane, R.A., and Robert Smirke, R.A., Esqrs., Attached Architects; five clerks of the works, nine labourers in trust, and two me&#0;???ssengers.

For other public boards, see their respective heads, as Woods and Forests, &c. Land Revenue, Customs, Excise, &c.

  • [[BOARDED ENTRY. - 1. is at No. 16, New Gravel Lane, St. George's in the East, the second turning on the left from Wapping. It leads into Ship Street and Prussian Island. - 2. is in London Wall. - 3. is in Surrey Street, Strand.
  • BOAR AND CASTLE INN, Oxford Street, a well known coach and booking office for most parts of England, is six houses on the north or right hand side of the way, going from St. Giles's.
  • [[BOAR'S HEAD COURT. - 1. is in Fleet Street, about the middle of the south or left hand side going toward Temple Bar, near the Boar's Head public house, between the Bolt-in-Tun Inn and Water Lane. - 2. is in West Smithfield, on the north side, by St. John's Street. - 3. is in Middlesex Street, Whitechapel, formerly Petticoat Lane, the first turning on the right hand, a few doors from Aldgate High Street. - 4. is in Gracechurch Street by Leadenhall Market - 5. is in High Street, Southwark. - 6. is in King Street, Westminster, about three houses from Great George Street. It leads into Delahoy Street.
  • BODDY'S BRIDGE, Upper Ground: Street, Christ Church, Surrey, is the second turning on the left from Blackfriars' Road, by the bridge foot.
  • BOLINGBROKE ROW, Walworth, is the first Row on the eastern side of the Camberwell Road, beyond the Red Lion or the turnpike, going from Walworth.
  • BOLT COURT, Fleet Street, is about a furlong on the right from Farringdon Street, and nearly opposite Water Lane. It leads into Gough Square, New Street Square, Pemberton Row and Fetter Lane. This court is celebrated for having been for many years the literary residence of Dr. Samuel Johnson, the great English moralist and lexicographer.
  • BOLT AND TUN INN, Fleet Street, a considerable booking office and Stage-coach Inn, is about the middle of the south side between Salisbury Court and Water Lane.
  • BOLTON ROW, Piccadilly, is at the north end of Bolton Street from Piccadilly, it leads into Curzon Street on the left, and by Lansdowne Passage into Berkeley Street on the right.
  • BOLTON STREET, London Road, turns off at No. 26, Alfred Place in that road, leading to Newington Causeway.
  • BOLTON STREET, Piccadilly, is about the middle of the north side, opposite the Green Park, and nearly half a mile from the Haymarket.
  • BOLTON YARD, Piccadilly, turns off at No. 10, Bolton Row, before mentioned.
  • BOLTWRIGHT'S COURT, Bethnal Green, is the third turning on the left in Mount Street, going from Church Street by the Charity School.
  • BOMBHOUSE ALLEY, Lambeth, is the first turning on the left in Princes Street, and nearly opposite Glasshouse Street, Vauxhall; it leads to Bombhouse or Gunhouse (now by corruption Gunner's) Stairs by the river side, near to Vauxhall Stairs.
  • BOND'S BUILDINGS, Fetter Lane, are in Roll's Buildings, and in continuation of Bond's Yard to Symond's Inn.
  • [[BOND COURT. - 1. is &#0;???in Walbrook, the second turning on the left from the Mansion House. - 2. is in Brunswick Row, Horse Ferry Road, Westminster, and is the second turning on the right from Strutton Ground, towards Buckingham Gate, opposite the Gray Coat School. - 3. is a turning at No. 7, Bond Street, Commercial Road, Waterloo Bridge Road.
  • BOND STREET, NEW]], Oxford Street, turns off on the south side, opposite Vere Street, and reaches as far as Old Bond Street, at Clifford Street on the east, and Grafton Street on the west. New Bond Street was continued into Oxford Street over an open field, called Conduit Mead, about the year 1700.
  • BOND STREET, OLD]], Piccadilly, turns off on the north side of that great thoroughfare, opposite St. James's Street, and is nearly a third of a mile on the right from the Haymarket; it is continued by New Bond Street into Oxford Street.
  • BOND STREET, Southwark, is in the Borough Road, St. George's Fields, the third turning on the right from the Obelisk, and nearly opposite Dover Street. It leads into Earl Street and St. George's Market. There are also four other Bond Streets. - 1. is in the Hackney Road. - 2. is at No. 20, Neptune Street, Rotherhithe. - 3. is at No. 61, Commercial Road, Lambeth. - 4. is at Chelsea, by the New Church of St. Luke.
  • BONE YARD, Goodman's Fields, is a few yards behind No. 82, Leman Street, and nearly opposite Prescot Street.
  • BONNER'S HALL, Bethnal Green, is a detached parcel of houses in Bonners. Fields, about a quarter of a mile to the north east of the green, and nearly half a mile to the eastward of Cambridge Heath Turnpike, Hackney Road. It is said to have been originally the palace of Bonner, Bishop of London. - [see Bethnal Green]
  • BONNER STREET, Bethnal Green, is in Green Street, Bonner's Fields, nearly the third of a mile on the left, eastward of the green.
  • BOODLE'S CLUB HOUSE, No. 28, St. James's Street, is a well known subscription house of many years' standing, and of the first respectability. Its number is limited to 500. J. Wheelwright, Esq. is Secretary.
  • BOOKER'S GARDENS, Leadenhall Street, turns off at No. 93, seven houses westward of Cree Church Lane, and leads into Heneage Lane and Duke's Place.
  • BOOK SOCIETY, No. 19, Paternoster Row. - [see Bible Societies]
  • BOOKE'S RENTS, Barbican, is in Garter Court, and turns off at No. 3, nearly opposite Redcross Street, Cripplegate.
  • [[BOOKING OFFICE of the Deanery of St. Paul's, is in Great Knight Rider Street, Doctors' Commons.
  • BOONE'S ALMS HOUSES, Lee, near Blackheath, are in the village of Lee, at the corner of the road that leads up to the church. Over the door is sculptured the arms of the founder, which are also carved in the chapel, beneath which is a vault for his family.

These alms houses were founded in 1623, by Charles Boone, Esq., whose family seat is in the parish, and Mary, his wife; with a chapel adjoining, and a school house for six poor persons, and a Schoolmistress, endowing it with lands and rents, then producing \\'a357 a year. They committed the care of this charity to the Merchant Tailors' Company, to whom they left \\'a3100 to defray the expenses of an annual visitation on the first Thursday in July. The Rector of Lee is to be Chaplain, or on his refusal, the Vicar of Lewisham, who with other officers have stated stipends, as detailed in Highmore's Pietas Londinensis.

  • [[BOOT A&#0;???LLEY]], Abchurch Lane, is six houses on the left from Lombard Street, and leads into Nicholas Lane.
  • BOOT STREET, Hoxton Market, is the first turning on the right in Pitfield Street, and parallel to part of Old Street Road. It reaches from Pitfield Street to Crown Street.
  • [[BOOTH COURT. - 1. is in Wells Street, Oxford Street, the third turning on the right from Oxford Street, and leading into Wells Mews. - 2. is in Twister's Alley, Bunhill Row, the continuation from No. 102, Bunhill Row - 3. is in Booth Street, Spitalfields, and is the second turning on the right from Brick Lane.
  • BOOTH STREET, Spitalfields, commences at No. 50, Brick Lane, about one fifth of a mile on the right from Osborn Street, Whitechapel Church, and leads to Wells Street and Church Street, Mile End New Town.
  • BORER'S BUILDINGS, Houndsditch, are at No. 31, Cutler Street, near the middle of the north side.
  • BORER'S PASSAGE, Houndsditch, turns off at the above named No. 31, Cutler Street, and leads to No. 8, Devonshire Square.
  • BOREHAM STREET, Shoreditch, turns off at No. 16, Peter Street, near Tyssen Street.
  • BOROUGH OF SOUTHWARK, THE]], is a considerable part of the British metropolis, which may be considered as consisting of the City of London, the City of Westminster, and the borough of Southwark, with their respective suburbs. Southwark, or, as it is more familiarly called, the Borough, lies entirely on the south side of the Thames, and in the county of Surrey. It consists of the parishes of St. Olave, St. Thomas, St. Saviour, St. George and St. John, and for its geographical extent, and for the number and respectability of its inhabitants, is inferior to few cities in England.

It is mentioned by some authors, that Southwark was known as a place of trade with the Romans, before London, which arose from it. The earliest known account of this borough is in the reign of Edward the Confessor, about the year 1053, when Earl Godwin arrived there without opposition, and passed London Bridge, in order to engage the royal navy, consisting of fifty ships of war, then lying off Westminster!

  • [[Southwark was governed by its own bailiff till 1327, when the mayor of London was constituted bailiff of Southwark, and empowered to govern it by his deputy. Some few years after this, the inhabitants recovered their ancient privileges; but in the fourth year of Edward VI. the crown made a second grant of it to the City for a valuable consideration, and it became a nominal ward under the title of Bridge Ward Without. That part of the Borough of Southwark which is subject to the city of London, is called the Borough Liberty, and is under the government of a high bailiff and other officers. [see Borough Court] The other division is called the Liberty of the Clink, and belongs to the Bishop of Winchester, who appoints a steward and bailiff to govern this district. The extent of this borough is from London Bridge, southward, to Newington; to the south west, almost to Lambeth; to Rotherhithe in the east; and by the Thames on the north. Its principal Streets are the High Street, more commonly called the Borough, Blackman Street, Kent Street, Tooley, or St. Olave's Street, and Bermondsey Street. - [see St. Olave, St. Thomas, St. Saviour, St. George, and St. John, Southwark]
  • BOROUGH, COURT OF]], SOUTHWARK]], St. Margaret's Hill, is a court of record by prescription, and is held every Monday by the Lord Mayor's steward, or justice, at the Town Hall, St. Margaret's Hill, where minor causes are tried. There are also three court leets for the three liberties, or manors, in which&#0;??? all business is despatched, peculiar to such courts. The present officers of this court are John Hohnes, Esq., High Bailiff; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Steward; Alderman Joshua Jonathan Smith, Justice of the Bridge Ward and Sitting Magistrate; Sir Richard Carr Glynn, Bart., Alderman of Bridge Ward Without; John Newman, Esq., Prothonotary and Clerk to the Sitting Magistrate; William Edwyn Burnaby and the Hon. Charles Ewan Law, Counsel; William Payne, Esq., Coroner; Richard Reeve, Marshal's Man for Southwark. There are four sessions held in every year, at which the Lord Mayor for each, and five members of the court of aldermen, by rotation, preside as justices. They are held in January, April, July and October.
  • [[BOROUGH HIGH STREET. - [see High Street, Southwark]
  • BOROUGH MARKET, a very considerable market for all sorts of provisions, but principally fruit and vegetables, is situated at the west end of York Street, going from High Street, about one sixth of a mile from London Bridge, on the right. It communicates with Three Crown Square, Park Street and Union Street.
  • BOROUGH ROAD, St. George's Fields, commences at the Stones End, by the King's Bench Prison, and extends to the Obelisk, by the Surrey Theatre. It is about one third of a mile in length.
  • [[BOROUGH SKIN MARKET is in Great Suffolk Street, near the King's Bench Prison, about the middle of the south side.
  • BOSIERS COURT, Oxford Street, leads from the first turning on the right in Oxford Street from St. Giles's, into Tottenham Court Road, just below Hanway Street.
  • [[BOSS ALLEY. - 1. is in Lower Thames Street, at the corner of St. Mary-at-Hill, and opposite Billingsgate. - 2. is in Gainsford Street, Horselydown, at No. 7, the first turning on the left from Horselydown Lane, leading to Shad Thames.
  • [[BOSS COURT. - 1. is in Boss Alley, Horselydown, aforesaid, the first turning on the left, and a few doors from Gainsford Street. - 2. is in Upper Thames Street, at No. 214, between Lambeth Hill and Peter's Hill, Doctors' Commons.
  • BOSTON MEWS, New Road, is in Upper Gloucester Place, Dorset Square.
  • BOSTON STREET, New Road, is also in Upper Gloucester Place, aforesaid.
  • BOSTOCK STREET, Old Gravel Lane, is at No. 154, the third turning on the right from Ratcliffe Highway.
  • BOSTON ROW, Brompton, is part of Queens Buildings, on the south east side of the High Street, or Road, at the end of Queen's Street, opposite Brompton Row, and about a quarter of a mile on the left from Knightsbridge.
  • BOSWELL COURT, NEW]], Red Lion Square, is at No. 18, North Street, the north end of which leads into Devonshire Street, Queen's Square.
  • BOSWELL COURT, NEW]], Carey Street, Chancery Lane, is at No. 18, and leads into Old Boswell Court and the Strand.
  • BOSWELL COURT, OLD]], Strand, is a few doors on the right hand from Temple Bar, opposite St. Clement's Church; it leads into New Boswell Court, Carey Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields.
  • BOTANICAL GARDENS, Chelsea, is about one seventh of a mile south west from the Royal Hospital, a&#0;???nd opposite to No. 31, Paradise Row. This establishment belongs to the Apothecaries' Company, who commenced it in the year 1673. When Sir Hans Sloane, who had studied botany in these Gardens, purchased the manor of Chelsea in 1721, he granted the freehold of the premises to the Company, on condition that they should present annually to the Royal Society, fifty specimens of different sorts of plants, well dried and fit for a hortus siccus, of the growth of the garden, till the number of the specimens should amount to two thousand. In 1733 the Company erected a marble statue of their benefactor, by Rysbrack, in the centre of the garden. In the gardens are spacious conservatories and green-houses, a library of botanical books, and a museum of dried plants. On the south side are two cedars of Libanus, that were planted in 1685, being then three feet high. In 1793 the girt of the larger at three feet from the ground was nearly thirteen feet, and that of the smaller more than twelve feet. In January 1809, both these fine trees suffered very severely from a heavy fall of snow, which broke off several of their limbs, and otherwise much injured them. The exotics growing in these Gardens are of the choicest description. [For the names of the superintendents of the gardens, see Apothecaries' Hall]
  • St. BOTOLPH ALDGATE PAROCHIAL SCHOOL, is situated on Tower Hill, nearly opposite to the Mint and the offices of the St. Katherine Docks. This is distinct from Sir John Cass's school at the corner of Aldgate [see Cass's School], and was the first Protestant parochial charity school established in London. It is also the first in London which adopted the national system of education that has been attended with such great success. This parish is very extensive, and stands without as well as within the boundaries of the city. The latter district is called the Freedom, and the former the Lordship, being manorial; but the children are chosen from both districts, and the school is managed by trustees resident in both. The former school house having become ruinous, a voluntary subscription was raised in 1792, sufficient to purchase the freehold on which the present school stands, and to pay for its erection. They educate and clothe 60 boys and 40 girls. Information relative to the school may be obtained from the Rev. Dr. Hollingsworth, the rector, or of the master of the school at the school house.
  • BOTOLPH ALLEY, Lower Thames Street, is the last turning on the right in Botolph Lane going from Thames Street, nearly opposite Billingsgate, to Eastcheap.
  • St. BOTOLPH, Aldersgate, the Church of, is situated at the south east corner of Little Britain, in Aldersgate Street Without, and received its name from St. Botolph, a British saint born in Cornwall, and from its contiguity to the ancient Alder's Gate. Although the fire in 1666 did not reach the ancient church, yet it was so decayed that a part of it was rebuilt in 1757, and farther repaired and beautified in 1829. It was anciently a rectory, the advowson of which was in the dean and canons of St. Martin's-le-Grand, but being for some time unappropriated, Richard II., in 1399, gave the income to the dean for a perpetual anniversary for his deceased consort Queen Anne. In 1593 Henry VII. annexed the collegiate Church of St. Martin's-le-Grand, with all its appurtenances, to the convent of St. Peter, Westminster; but at the suppression of monasteries it was granted by Henry VIII. to his new bishop of Westminster. That bishopric having been dissolved by Queen Mary, and the abbot and monks restored to their convent, this church reverted to its old masters; but when the monks were finally expelled, and the convent converted into a collegiate Church by authority of parliament in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, she granted the curacy to the dean and chapter of Westminster, in whom it still remains, subject however t&#0;???o the bishop and archdeacon of London, to whom it pays procuration. The advowson is a perpetual curacy, held by the Rev. Thomas H. Causton, who was instituted by the aforesaid dean and chapter in 1821.
  • St. BOTOLPH, Aldgate, the Church of, is situated at the south east corner of Houndsditch, and nearly opposite the Minories, in Aldgate High Street. It is one of the four churches in London dedicated by our ancestors to their favourite saint, Botolph the Briton. The old church, which was rebuilt by the prior and canons of the Holy Trinity, a short time before the dissolution of that convent, escaped the fire in 1666; but it had become so ruinous in 1741, that it was taken down and the present edifice finished in 1744. It is built principally with brick, and is a plain, bold and massive structure, consisting of a regular formed body and a lofty spire on a rusticated tower.

This church was a rectory of very an ancient foundation, the patronage of which was in the proprietors of Portsoken Ward, who, in 1115, gave it to the prior and convent of the Holy Trinity. At the dissolution of that priory, it was seized by the crown, and in 1577 Queen Elizabeth gave it to Robert Holliwell for a term of years; at the expiration of which it was granted by James I. to Francis Morrice, from whom it descended to several others, and the impropriation has ever since continued in private hands.

It is now a perpetual curacy, of which Robert Kynaston, Esq., is the patron, who instituted the Rev. J. B. Hollingsworth, D.D., Archdeacon of Huntingdon in 1824.

  • St. BOTOLPH'S, Billingsgate, the Church of, was formerly in Lower Thames Street. The ancient church of this parish having been destroyed by the great fire of 1666 was not rebuilt, but the parish was by act of parliament united to that of St. George, Botolph Lane. - [see St. George, Botolph Lane, the Church of]
  • St. BOTOLPH, Bishopsgate, the Church of, is situated on the west side of Bishopsgate Street Without, and nearly opposite the western end of Houndsditch. The ancient church of this name was of very ancient foundation, and received its name from the before mentioned Anglo Saxon Saint, who died about the year 680. The first authentic account of this church is in 1323, when John de Northampton resigned the rectorship, which then was, and still is, in the gift of the Bishop of London. The old church which stood upon the bank of the ancient city ditch escaped the fire of London, but became so ruinous that it was taken down in 1726, and rebuilt from the designs of the elder George Dance. It was finished in 1729, and is a spacious, substantial, and well built structure. The spire is peculiarly handsome, and with that of Shoreditch, by the same architect, among the best since the days of Wren. The east end, which is next the street, is decorated with Doric pilasters, and a large window, with entrance doors at the sides, which excited much criticism at the time of its completion. It arises from the circumstance of the necessity (so then conceived) of placing the altar always at the east end, which, in this instance, deprived the principal front of the advantage of a grand central door. The living is a rectory in the gift of the King and the Bishop of London, and the present incumbent is the Hon. and Rev. E. Grey, who was instituted by the King in 1828.
  • BOTOLPH ALLEY, is a turning at No. 40, in Botolph Lane, Lower Thames Street.
  • BOTOLPH LANE, Eastcheap, or Lower Thames Street, is the second turning eastward from and parallel to Fish Street Hill. It extends from No. 16, Eastcheap, to No. 111, Lower Thames Street, nearly opposite to Billingsgate Fish Market.
  • BOTTLE ALLEY, Bishopsgate Without, turns off at &#0;???No. 183, opposite New Street.
  • BOTTLE OF HAY YARD, St. John's Street, Clerkenwell, turns off at No. 215, about one third of a mile on the left hand from Smithfield.
  • BOTWRIGHT'S or BOLTWRIGHT'S BUILDINGS, Hackney Road, is about one third of a mile on the left from Shoreditch church, opposite the Middlesex Chapel. For another Botwrights Buildings, Bethnal Green, see Mount Court.
  • BOUGH COURT, Shoreditch, is behind No. 236, and leads into Plough Yard, Cumberland Street, and the Curtain Road.
  • BOUNDARY ROW, is at No. 92, Great Surrey Street, Blackfriars' Road.
  • BOURDON STREET, Berkeley Square, is in Davies Street, at No. 33, four houses from the square.
  • BOURNE'S ALMS HOUSES, Kingsland Road, are on the east side of that road, leading from Shoreditch to Kingsland. They were built and endowed in pursuance of the will of Mr. Thomas Bourne, dated the 14th of August, 1727, for erecting and maintaining an alms house, for the habitation of twelve poor freemen of the Company of Framework Knitters of London, or of twelve poor persons, part of them freemen, and the other part widows of freemen of the said Company, to be appointed by the master, wardens, and court of assistants. Of this legacy he left \\'a31,000 for the purchase of the ground, and building, \\ldblquote the house and conveniences,\\rdblquote and \\'a32,000 to be laid out in the purchase of lands in fee simple, in the name of the master, &c., of the said company.

The parliamentary report gives many particulars of a chancery suit instituted by the Company against Bourne's executors. The court appointed trustees, the alms houses were erected in 1734, and in November 1734 the executors placed twelve poor members of the Company in them, with an allowance of \\'a38 each a year.

A further income is derived to this charity, under the will of Mr. Thomas Cook, dated the 28th of March, 1810, whereby he left \\'a32,100 three per cent, consols, the dividends of which are to be paid in equal parts for ever to the alms people. Mrs. Staunton, also, a daughter in law of the founder, left a legacy of \\'a3300 to buy bread and coals for the use of the poor people in her father's alms houses. Part of Cook's legacy was lost through being invested in the unfortunate South Sea bubble, instead of in land; but altogether the alms people receive in addition to comfortable dwellings, \\'a37 a year, and three sacks of coals.

The alms houses consist of twelve small dwellings under one roof, containing each two apartments, with a small garden and fore-court to each, and are in good condition, having been recently substantially repaired. They are inhabited by twelve alms people, appointed as directed by the will.

  • BOUVERIE STREET, Fleet Street, is a wide new street that turns off at No. 62, about the middle of the south side of Fleet Street. It leads towards Whitefriars, and the eastern gate of the Temple.
  • BOW CHURCH YARD, Cheapside, is a small square, with houses on two sides, turning off at No. 54, Cheapside, on the west side of the church, and leads into Bow Lane. It receives its name from the Church of St. Mary-le-Bow.
  • BOW LANE, Cheapside, is at No. 69, on the east side of the church, and leads into Trinity Lane and St. Thomas the Apostle. It is continued by Garlick Hill into Upper Thames Street, nearly oppo&#0;???site Kennett Wharf.
  • BOW LANE, Poplar, turns off at No. 176, High Street, near the east end, and is the first turning on the left below the Red Lion public house. It leads into Cotton Street and the East India Dock Road.
  • BOW LANE COURT, Poplar, is the second turning on the right from the East India Dock Gate.
  • BOW STREET, Covent Garden, is the first turning eastward, and parallel to the east side of the great piazza. It extends from No. 63, near the east end of Long Acre, to Great Russell Street.
  • BOW YARD, Broad Street, St. Giles's, turns off at No. 37, opposite George Street, and leads into Belton Street, Hanover Street, and to No. 96, Long Acre.
  • BOWLING ALLEY, Whitecross Street, Cripplegate, turns off at No. 21, the third on the left from Fore Street, and leads into Cradle Court, and No. 61, Redcross Street.
  • BOWLING BUILDINGS, New Road, are by the side of No. 22, Upper York Street, near Lisson Green.
  • BOWLING GREEN, THE]], Edgware Road, opposite No. 27, about a furlong on the left hand from the western end of Oxford Street.
  • BOWLING GREEN BUILDINGS, New Road, Paddington, is on the east side of the Bowling Green, by the Turnpike, leading towards York Street.
  • BOWLING GREEN, Southwark, is in King Street, at No. 49, about a furlong on the right from No. 107, High Street.
  • BOWLING GREEN LANE, High Street, Mary-le-bone, is at No. 27, on the east side, leading to Weymouth Street.
  • BOWLING GREEN LANE, Clerkenwell, is the north turning parallel to the Green; it extends from the middle of Coppice Row, opposite the Workhouse, to Rosamond Street, and is continued by Corporation Row to St. John Street.
  • BOWLING GREEN PLACE, Woodstock Street, Mary-le-bone, is at No. 7, between Chesterfield Street and Weymouth Street.
  • BOWLING GREEN ROW, Hoxton, is the third turning on the right from Old Street Road, along Pitfield Street, and opposite to the Haberdashers' Company's Alms Houses.
  • BOWLING GREEN ROW, Kennington Common, is the first turning on the left from the Horns Tavern towards the green, and leads into the Oval.
  • BOWL AND PIN ALLEY, Bream's Buildings, Chancery Lane, is situate between No. 39, Chancery Lane, and No. 108, Fetter Lane.
  • BOWL AND PIN GARDENS, Chancery Lane, are at the first turning on the right in the above, from Bream's Buildings.
  • BOWLING STREET, Westminster, is the third turning on the left in College Street, from No. 18, Abingdon Street, opposite Dean's Yard; it leads into Tufton Street and the Horse Ferry Road.
  • BOWLING STREET, Turnmill Street, Clerkenwell, is the third turning on the left from Cow Cross, Smithfield, and leads into White Horse Alley.
  • BOWMAN'S BUILDINGS, Aldersgate Street, are at No. 140, opposite Jewin Street, and leads into Queen Square, Bartholomew Close, and Smithfield.
  • BOWYER'S BUILDINGS, St. George's in the East, are the first turning on the right in James Street from Cannon Street Roa&#0;???d.
  • BOWYERS, THE COMPANY OF]], having at present no hall, hold their meetings at a tavern. The bowyers or bow makers of London, were a fraternity by prescription, till the 18th James I., when they were incorporated by the names of \\ldblquote The Master Wardens, and Society of the Mystery of Bowyers of the City of London.\\rdblquote It is singular, considering the consequence of this trade in the early warfare of England, whose soldiers were renowned for their skill in the use of the bow, that this company should not have been incorporated until the use of that weapon had been superseded by the introduction of firearms.
  • BOWYER'S CHARITY, Stationers' Hall, Ludgate Street, This very excellent charity was founded by William Bowyer, who by will dated the 30th July, 1777, gave \\'a32,000 reduced annuities, in trust, to pay the dividends equally among three printers, compositors or pressmen, to be chosen by the court of assistants of the Stationers Company, at sixty three years of age or upwards, payable half yearly, during their lives; the most deserving of the applicants to be preferred. He also bequeathed \\'a33,000. 4 per cent consols, until the marriage of his son with consent of his executors, in trust, to divide the interest, until such marriage, equally between six other printers, compositors or pressmen, in the same manner. And if his son should the unmarried, or marry without such consent, then such annuities were bequeathed in perpetuity. Also, \\'a31,000 reduced annuities, in trust, that the court of the said company should nominate a compositor, who is a man of good life and conversation, who shall usually frequent some place of worship every Sunday, unless prevented by sickness, and shall not have worked upon a newspaper or magazine for four years, at least, before such nomination, nor shall ever afterwards while he holds this annuity, which may be for life, if he continue a journeyman. He must be able to read and construe Latin, to read Greek fluently with accents, of which he shall bring a testimonial from the rector of St. Martin, Ludgate. \\ldblquote I could wish,\\rdblquote says the testator, \\ldblquote that he shall have been brought up piously and virtuously; if it be possible at Merchant Tailors', or some other public school, from seven years of age till he is full seventeen, and then to serve seven years faithfully as a compositor, and work seven years more as a journeyman, as I would not have this annuity bestowed on anyone under thirty-one years of age. If after he is chosen, he should behave ill, let him be turned out and another be chosen in his stead.\\rdblquote He bequeathed the company \\'a3250. if they should accept the trust, for their trouble. The before mentioned son of Mr. Bowyer died unmarried, the whole legacy, therefore, became liable to its testator's intentions, and the whole sum, amounting to \\'a36,000 in the three per cents., now stands in the company's name; and the yearly dividends, amounting to \\'a3180, is divided, says Mr. Highmore, (Pietas Londinenses, p. 536.) \\'a330 to one annuitant, \\'a320 to three others, and \\'a315 each to six more. - [For other charities of a similar nature, see Printers, Pension Society, Stationers' Fund, Strahan's Charity, &c.]
  • BOWYER'S BUILDINGS, St. George's in the East, are the first turning on the right in James Street, Cannon Street Road, and nearly opposite Beaumont Buildings.
  • BOWYER LANE, Camberwell, is a road that leads from the Camberwell New Road into the Camberwell Old Road.
  • BOYDE'S GARDENS, Pimlico, are the first turning on the left from the southern end of Upper Belgrave Terrace, towards Belgrave Square, and about two-thirds of a mile on the right from Buckingham Gate.
  • [[BOYDE'S &#0;???WALK]], Pimlico, is a few yards from the last, towards Belgrave Square.
  • [[BOY COURT. - [see Naked Boy Court]
  • BOYLE STREET, New Burlington Street, is at the west end of that street, going from Regent Street, and commences at Saville Row.
  • [[BOZIER'S COURT. - [see Bosier's Court]
  • BRABANT COURT, Philpot Lane, is at No. 78, the first turning on the right from No. 12, Fenchurch Street.
  • BRACE'S BUILDINGS, Rosemary Lane, is at the south end of Blue Anchor Yard, going from Rosemary Lane. It leads into New Martin Street, and to No. 110, Upper East Smithfield.
  • BRACKLEY STREET, Cripplegate, is the fourth turning on the left in Golden Lane, going from Barbican, it leads into Bridgewater Gardens, and to No. 1, Goswell Street.
  • BRAD STREET, Waterloo Bridge Road, is in Cornwall New Road, that crosses Upper Stamford Street, eastward of the Coburg Theatre.
  • BRADSHAW'S COURT, Blackfriars, is the first turning on the left in Currier's Row, going from Bristow Street, St. Andrew's Hill.
  • BRADSHAW'S RENTS, Portpool Lane, is the first turning on the right from the north end of Leather Lane, Holborn, at the back of Reid's Brewery.
  • BRADY'S BUILDINGS, Bethnal Green Road, are at No. 2, Hart's Lane, the first turning on the left, below the Turnpike, about half a mile from Shoreditch.
  • BRAGG'S WAYS, Rotherhithe, adjoins Rotherhithe Stairs, on the east side, about one-third of a mile eastward of London Bridge.
  • BRAMAH'S LANE, Chelsea, turns off at the right, between Arabella Row, Pimlico, and Belgrave Place.
  • BRANCH BUILDINGS, Finsbury, are the first turning on the right in Tabernacle Walk, northward of Leonard Street, and nearly opposite the Tabernacle.
  • BRANCH COURT, Limehouse, is in Narrow Street, which leads from Ratcliffe Cross to Fore Street.
  • BRANCH PLACE, Hoxton, is near the Rosemary Branch Tavern, by the two Mills, between Islington and the Kingsland Road,
  • BRANCH PLACE, Cable Street, Wellclose Square, is at No. 72, near the east end of Rosemary Lane.
  • BRANDON'S FIELDS, Blackwall, are in Bow Lane, the north side of the East India Dock Gates.
  • BRANDON ROW, Newington Causeway, is the first turning on the left from the county gaol, in Horsemonger Lane, towards the Elephant and Castle, by the Turnpike; it leads into Poplar Row and the Kent Road.
  • BRANDON STREET, Bermondsey New Road, is at No. 17, the east side, and the fourth turning on the right from the Bricklayers' Arms, Kent Road, going towards Bermondsey Church; it leads into Cross Street.
  • BRANDON'S WAREHOUSE, No. 88, Leadenhall Street, is on the same principle as a sufferance wharf, where goods may be deposited without payment of duties, as specified in the Warehousing Act.
  • BRAY COURT, BRAY PLACE]], and BRAY STREET]], Islington, are all in Lower Street, which turns off at No. 8, in the Lower Road, leading to Ball's Pond.
  • BRAYNES' ROW, Clerkenwell, is about a quarter of a mile on the right hand, in Coppice Row, northward of the Green, and towards Pentonville. It extends from the turnpike, by the House of Correction, to Rosamond Street.
  • BRAZIERS' BUILDINGS, Farringdon Street, is at No. 30, the fourth turning on the right from Ludgate Hill, and leads into Seacoal Lane, and Snow Hill.
  • BRAZIERS' ALMS HOUSES, THE]], are in Two Swan Yard, or Bottle Alley, at No. 186, Bishopsgate Without. They were founded by Lady Elizabeth Morys, relict of Sir Christopher Morys, by will dated the 8th of May, 1551. They were originally thirteen small tenements for as many alms people, in Love Lane, Old Jewry, but were purchased by the Bank of England, under an act of parliament of the 49th George III., for \\'a310,000. The company rebuilt and re-endowed them, under that act, in the above-named situation, of fifteen sets of apartments, which, at the survey by the parliamentary commissioners, are reported by them to be occupied by thirteen poor persons belonging to the company, who are placed in them from time to time by the Court of Assistants. - [For further particulars see the said reports, title, \\ldblquote Armourers' and Braziers' Company\\rdblquote ]
  • BRAZIERS' HALL, Coleman Street, is at the north east corner of London Wall and Coleman-street. - [see Armourers' and Braziers' Hall] These two companies were incorporated by letters patent, dated the 17th June, in the seventh year of Queen Anne, which enacts \\ldblquote that all persons working and making, or who thereafter should work and make vessels and wares of copper and brass wrought with the hammer, in the city of London, or within five miles thereof,\\rdblquote were incorporated with the Company of Armourers by the name of \\ldblquote The Company of Armourers and Braziers in the City of London.\\rdblquote [For their charities see the Reports of the Parliamentary Commissioners in the Endowed Charities of London]
  • BREAD STREET, Cheapside, turns off at No. 46, the third turning on the south or right hand side going from St. Paul's Churchyard. It extends to Old Fish Street. This street derives its name from having been, in ancient times, the bread-market of the city. Its gives its name to the ward, which is bounded on the north and north-west by the ward of Farringdon Within; on the west, by that of Castle Baynard; on the south, by Queenhithe; and on the east, by Castle Baynard. It is governed by an alderman (John Ansley, Esq.), twelve common councilmen, and other officers. The principal streets in Bread Street ward are, Watling Street, Bread Street, Friday Street, Basing Lane, the eastern side of the Old Change, the north side of Old Fish Street, Trinity Lane, and that part of the southern side of Cheapside that lies between Friday Street and Bow Church. Its most remarkable buildings are the parish churches of Allhallows, Bread Street, St. Mildred's, Friday Street, and Cordwainers' Hall, in Distaff Lane. - [see these several places]
  • BREAD STREET HILL, Upper Thames Street, is at No. 201, and is continued by Bread Street into Cheapside.
  • BREAKNECK STEPS, Blackfriars, is the first turning on the right in Bristow Street, going from St. Andrew's Hill.
  • BREAMS BUILDINGS, Chancery Lane, turns off at No. 27, near the middle of the east side, and lead into Rolls' Buildings and Fetter Lane.
  • BREAM'S BUILDINGS, LITTLE]], Chancery Lane, are the first turning on the left in White's Alley; they lead from the last, and extend into Bowl and Pin Alley.
  • BREEZER'S HILL, Ratcliffe Highway, is at No. 1, opposite Ship Alley, Wellclose Square, and leads to &#0;???the London Docks.
  • BRENT'S COURT, Southwark, is by the side of No. 182, High Street, on the west side, nearly opposite Layton's Grove, about one third of a mile on the right from London Bridge, and the sixth turning southward of Union Street.
  • BRETT'S or BRITT'S ALLEY or BUILDINGS, Finsbury. - 1. is the fourth turning on the right at No. 87, Long Alley, going from Worship Street, and nearly opposite Primrose Street, Bishopsgate. - 2. is in Osborne Street, Whitechapel - 3. is in Hoxton Fields.
  • BREWER'S ALLEY, Rotherhithe, is in Cherry Garden Street, near Mill Pond Bridge.
  • [[BREWER'S ALMS HOUSES. - [see Brewer's Hall]
  • [[BREWER COURT. - 1. is in Bedfordbury, at No. 34, the middle of the east side opposite Chemister Alley. - 2. is in Great Wild Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, on the west side, and nearly opposite Wild Court. - 3. is in Golden Lane, St. Luke's, the fourth turning on the left hand from Old Street, opposite Bember's Rents. - 4. is in St. Thomas's Street, Southwark, the first turning on the right from High Street. - 5. is in Morgan's Lane, Tooley Street, the first turning on the left from No. 79, Tooley Street; it leads into Mill Lane.
  • BREWER'S GREEN, Westminster, is the first turning on the west, parallel to Strutton Ground, between the Blue Coat School and Bridewell, and nearly opposite Buckingham Row, Tothill Fields.
  • BREWER'S HALL, Addle Street, Wood Street, Cheapside, is at No. 19, the second house on the right hand from Aldermanbury. It is a large and commodious hall, supported by columns, and with a handsome entrance from the street into a spacious courtyard, paved with stone. The Company, which is the fourteenth on the city list, was incorporated by Henry VI., in the year 1438; by the name of \\ldblquote the Master, and Keepers or Wardens, and Commonalty of the Mystery or Art of Brewers of the City of London.\\rdblquote King Edward IV. not only confirmed that charter, but granted them the further power of making bye-laws. This corporation anciently bore the arms of Thomas \\'e0 Becket, impaled with their own; but upon that saint's bones being taken up and burned, and his saintship deprived of his sanctity, by the reigning powers, Clarencieux King at arms in 1544 separated them, and gave the company a crest instead. The Brewer's Company in 1224 rebuilt Cripplegate, that had been much dilapidated. - [see Cripplegate]

Among the charitable institutions under the guardianship of this Company, are the hospital or alms houses at Islington, founded and endowed by Lady Alice Owen about the year 1609. An arrow from the bow of an archer who was exercising in Islington Fields, having pierced the hat of the foundress, she raised this hospital as a votive offer of gratitude for her protection. [see Owen's Alms Houses]

They are also trustees of Platt's Free School and alms house at Aldenham, in Hertfordshire; of Alderman Hickson's School in the parish of Allhallows, Barking; of alms houses at South Mimms, in Hertfordshire; of the munificent gift of the late Samuel Whitbread (the elder), Esq.; of estates in Whitecross Street. Great Barford, in the county of Bedford, &c., and other benevolent charities, of which full accounts may be found in the Parliamentary Reports of the endowed charities of the City of London.

  • [[BREWER'S LANE. - 1. is&#0;??? in Upper Thames Street, and reaches from No. 83, to Dowgate Wharf. - 2. is in Wapping, at No. 128, Wapping Street, and leads to New Market Street and Old Gravel Lane.
  • BREWER'S QUAY, Lower Thames Street, one of the legal quays [see Legal Quays], is about one third of a mile eastward of Fish Street Hill, and the last turning on the right to the Thames before coming to Tower Hill.
  • BREWER'S ROW, Brewer's Green, Westminster, is the first turning on the right from the east end of James Street, Buckingham Gate.
  • BREWER STREET, Pimlico, is the fifth turning on the left about a quarter of a mile south from Buckingham Gate; it leads by Elliott's, or the Stag Brewery, to Castle Lane and York Street, Westminster, and the Vauxhall Bridge Road.
  • BREWER STREET, Bloomsbury, is the first turning on the left in Museum Street, from High Holborn, opposite Drury Lane; it leads into Duke Street.
  • BREWER STREET, Golden Square, is the second turning on the left in Great Windmill Street from the Haymarket, and is the continuation of Little Pulteney Street from Wardour Street. It leads to Glasshouse Street and Vigo Lane.
  • BREWER'S STREET, Somers Town, a new Street on the Brewer's Company's estate, turns off at No. 17, Skinner Street, Somers Town.
  • BREWER STREET, Drury Lane, is at No. 39, Parker Street, the first turning on the right hand, north of Great Queen Street and Long Acre.
  • BREWHOUSE ALLEY, Bunhill Row, is the third turning on the right hand from No. 118, Bunhill Row.
  • BREWHOUSE COURT, Long Alley, Moorfields, is about five houses on the right from No. 33, on the north side of Sun Street.
  • BREWHOUSE STREET, Shadwell, is the first turning on the right in Labour-in-Vain Street, from the south east corner of Shadwell Market, and is the continuation of Pope's Hill, from No. 75. High Street.
  • BREWHOUSE TURNING, Southwark, is the second turning on the right hand in Vine Yard, going from Tooley Street.
  • [[BREWHOUSE YARD. - 1. Bermondsey, is the first turning on the left in Cherry Garden Street, going from Cherry Garden Stairs, Rotherhithe Wall; it leads into West Lane. - 2. is in Field Lane, Holborn Bridge, the corner of Lower West Street, behind No. 1, Saffron Hill. - 3. is in Angel Alley, Skinner Street, Bishopsgate Without, behind No. 38, Skinner Street; the entrance is by Angel Passage; also the third turning on the left in Angel Alley, from Long Alley, Moorfields. - 4. is in Lower Turning, Shadwell, at the bottom of Fox's Lane, from the church on the right hand by the New Road to the London Docks. - 5. is in Cartwright Street, Rosemary Lane, seven houses on the left from No. 32, Rosemary Lane.
  • BRIAN BUILDINGS, St. George's Fields, is in Green Street, Blackfriars' Road, the second turning on the right from Bennet's Row.
  • BRIAN COURT, Webb Square, is the first turning on the left from No. 48, Shoreditch.
  • BRIAN STREET, Shoreditch, is behind No. 47, on the east side, about three quarters of a mile on the right hand northward of Cornhill, at the entrance to Webb Square.
  • BRICK COURT, Middle Temple Lane, is the first broad&#0;??? opening on the right hand in going down from Fleet Street, through the entrance nearest to Temple Bar; it leads into New Court and Essex Street.
  • BRICK COURT, Shire Lane, Temple Bar, is the first turning on the right, a few doors from Temple Bar.
  • BRICKELL'S BUILDINGS, St. George's Fields, are the first turning southward, and parallel to the King's Bench; they extend from the Borough Road to Newington Road or Causeway.
  • BRICK HILL LANE, Upper Thames Street, is on the south side, and opposite to No. 179, between Joiner's Hall Buildings and Queen Street Place, Southwark Bridge; it leads to the Thames. This lane was formerly called Brickle's Lane, and Brick Kiln Lane, but it evidently derives its name from John Brykles, citizen and draper, who bequeathed considerable property on the east side of the lane, in 1440, to the parish of Allhallows the Great. - [see Allhallows the Great]
  • [[BRICK LANE. - 1. is in St. Luke's, at No. 113, Old Street, the first turning on the left from Goswell Street; it is about one sixth of a mile in length, and leads towards Anderson's Buildings, City Road. - 2. is at Bethnal Green and Spitalfields, it is the northern continuation of Osborne Street, opposite Whitechapel Church, and commences at Wentworth Street, leads to Church Street, Bethnal Green, and is the fifth turning on the right from Shoreditch. It is nearly five eighths of a mile in length. - 3. is in Osborne Street, Whitechapel.
  • BRICKLAYERS ARMS, Kent Road, a well known Coach and Booking office, is at the east end of Kent Street, about two thirds of a mile from St. George's Church, and near the same distance from the Elephant and Castle.
  • BRICKLAYERS' HALL, Leadenhall Street, is up a court, behind No. 53, in that street, and is now used as a Synagogue for Dutch Jews. The Company appears to be very ancient, yet it was not incorporated till the reign of Queen Elizabeth, who, by letters patent, dated the 3rd August 1568, incorporated them, by the name of \\ldblquote The Master and Keepers or Wardens of the Society of Freemen of the Mystery or Art of Tylers and Bricklayers of London.\\rdblquote
  • BRICK STREET, Piccadilly, is the first turning on the left in Engine Street, a few yards from Piccadilly; it leads to No. 14, Down Street.
  • BRICK STREET, Southwark, is the third turning on the left from the King's Bench Prison, going towards the Obelisk; it leads to St. George's Market and Newington Road or Causeway.
  • St. BRIDE'S AVENUE, Fleet Street, is a handsome new opening, that leads to St. Bride's Church, and opens to public view its majestic spire. This great improvement arose from the circumstance of a fire which took place on the night of the 14th of November, 1824, and destroyed all the houses from the corner of St. Bride's Passage, a narrow alley now built upon, by the side of Messrs. Davenport and Co's. China Warehouse. The present avenue was formed in its stead, and leads up to the principal entrances of the church, instead of the former narrow and inconvenient passage. The design for the avenue and the new houses, on both sides, was prepared by J. B. Papworth, Esq. The ground was purchased by a public subscription, to which the late John Blades, Esq., of Ludgate Hill, contributed a very large sum, amounting, it is said, to no less than \\'a36,000 or \\'a37,000. The inhabitants contributed liberally, as did the present Archbishop of Canterbury, (Dr. Howley) who was then Bishop of London. For more detailed particulars of this avenue, and its history, the reader is referred to \\ldblquote London in the Nineteenth Century,\\rdblquote by the Editor of this Dictionary, p. 237.
  • St. BRIDE'S or St. BRIDGET'S, Fleet Street, the Church of, is situated to the southward of the above described avenue, and is bounded by the avenue on the north, St. Bride's Passage, Salisbury Square, on the west; Bride Lane on the east, and the backs of the houses of Bell's Buildings on the south.

This church is a fabric of great strength and beauty, and forms one of the most striking features of the metropolis. Its interior is spacious, commodious and elegant, being one hundred and eleven feet in length, fifty seven in breadth, and forty one in height; is remarkably well pewed, with moulded wainscot, and is composed of a lofty nave, covered with a vaulted ceiling, and two aisles, separated by coupled columns of the Doric order. The old church was so much damaged by the fire of 1666, that it was taken down and entirely rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren, who completed it for divine service in 1680, and further embellished it in 1699. The tower and steeple were began in October 1701, and completed in 1703. The church has since that time undergone several expensive repairs, and has been recently restored and beautified in a manner deserving its great reputation, and creditable to the munificence of the parishioners.

This church appears to be of considerable antiquity, as there are records of three rectors previous to 1362. It was a very small building, till about 1480, when it was greatly enlarged by William Venor, who erected a spacious fabric at its west end, which consisted of a nave and two aisles, to which the ancient church served as a choir. In 1610, the Earl of Dorset gave a large piece of ground on the west side of Fleet Ditch, for a new burial ground, and it was consecrated the 2d of August, of that year, by Dr. George Abbott, Bishop of London. This cemetery, which is behind the west side of Farringdon Street, is still used for that purpose. It was originally a rectory in the patronage of the Abbot and Convent of Westminster, and is supposed to have been converted into a vicarage about the year 1529. When Henry VIII. dissolved the Convent of Westminster and formed it into a bishoprick, this church was conferred upon the new Bishop, and restored to the Abbot by his daughter, Mary, but on the restoration of the deanery by Edward IV., the patronage was granted to the Dean and Chapter, in whom it still continues. The present vicar is the Rev. Joseph Allen, D.D., Prebendary of Westminster, and Vicar of Battersea. He was instituted by the Dean and Chapter in 1829.

  • St. BRIDE'S COURT, Bridge Street, Blackfriars, is four houses on the right from Fleet Street towards Blackfriars' Bridge, and leads into Bride Lane.
  • BRIDE LANE, Fleet Street, turns off at No. 98, the first turning on the left from Farringdon Street, and leads into Bridge Street.
  • St. BRIDE'S PASSAGE, is a continuation of the avenue, right and left, into Salisbury Court and Bride Lane.
  • St. BRIDE'S WORKHOUSE, Shoe Lane, is behind the houses in that lane and Fleet Street, and has entrances from both, the latter being directly opposite the avenue. It is a spacious, clean and well conducted establishment.
  • BRIDEWELL HOSPITAL, Bridge Street, Blackfriars, is about twelve or thirteen houses on the west or right hand side of that street, going towards the bridge, and has a handsome gateway and entrance nearly opposite the Crescent. On the site of this building stood, in ancient times, even before the Norman invasion, a royal palace wherein King John subsequently held his Court. Within the precincts of this royal residence was a well of the purest water, dedicated, as was the practice &#0;???of the ancient church of Rome, to St. Bridget or St. Bride, and which gave its name, to the precinct, the parish and the church. This spot was part of the arx palatina, which stood near the river Fleet. The palace of Bridewell was rebuilt by Henry VIII., in 1522, for the reception of the Emperor Charles V., and it continued as a royal residence, with few intermissions, till the reign of Edward VI. who presented it, in 1653, to the mayor, commonalty and citizens of London, to be a working house for the poor and idle persons of the city. This building was almost totally destroyed by the fire of 1666, and was rebuilt in 1668. It contains a hall, in which is a painting of Edward VI. delivering its charter to Sir George Barnes, the Lord Mayor, a chapel, a prison and other buildings. The affairs of this hospital are governed by the same committee that manages Bethlem, to which it is united as one of the five royal hospitals of the city, and its president and other officers are the same. - [see Bethlem Hospital]

From the circumstance of this hospital being, used as a house of correction, it has conferred the name of Bridewell upon many such establishments.

  • BRIDEWELL, Clerkenwell Green, is on the north side of the church, facing St. James's Walk.
  • BRIDEWELL PRECINCT, is situate on the west side of Blackfriars' Bridge, and extends to Whitefriars.
  • BRIDEWELL WALK, Clerkenwell Close, is the north continuation of that close, entering by the church near Rosamond Street.
  • BRIDEWELL, Westminster, is at the east end of James Street, nearly half a mile on the right from Buckingham Gate, and facing the west end of Great Peter Street.
  • BRIDGE COURT, Westminster, is behind the north side of Bridge Street.
  • BRIDGE DOCK, Limehouse, is at the east end of Narrow Street, near the Drawbridge.
  • BRIDGE HOUSE, Southwark, is an estate consisting of store houses &c. in Bridge House Yard, Tooley Street, belonging to the corporation of London. It appears to have had its foundation with the ancient bridge itself. It had formerly several granaries for the use of the city in times of scarcity, and also ten ovens for baking bread for the relief of the poorer citizens. The Bridge House and its estates are under the management of two bridge-masters and a committee, consisting of the Lord Mayor and eleven other aldermen, and one commoner, for every ward. The present bridge-masters are Messrs. Lewis Lewis and William Gillman, and their office is in Guildhall.
  • BRIDGE HOUSE PLACE, Southwark, is on the right hand side of the road, that leads from the Stones End in the Borough to the Elephant and Castle.
  • BRIDGE PLACE, Rawstome Street, Clerkenwell, is the first turning on the left, a few doors from Goswell Street Road.
  • BRIDGE PLACE, Bermondsey, is situate in the Deptford Lower Road, near the Surrey Canal, between the south end of George's Row, Dock Head, and the Neckinger turnpike.
  • BRIDGE ROAD, Lambeth, extends from the east end of Westminster Bridge to the Marsh Gate; the road between the Asylum and the Obelisk is called Westminster Bridge Road - which see.
  • BRIDGE ROW, Pimlico, it the south continuation of Belgrave Terrace, extending to Kemp's Row, opposite Ranelagh Walk.
  • BRIDGE ROW GROVE, Southwark, Guildford Street, Borough, is about the middle of the west side of it.
  • BRIDGE STREET, NEW]], Blackfriars,&#0;??? so called from its situation with respect to Blackfriars' Bridge, commences at the point where Ludgate Hill, Farringdon Street, and Fleet Street intersect, and extends to the bridge.
  • BRIDGE STREET, LITTLE]], four doors on the left in Bridge Street from Farringdon Street, leading into Cock Court and Ludgate Hill, opposite the Old Bailey.
  • BRIDGE STREET, Westminster, is about one third of a mile south from Charing Cross towards the Abbey, extending from King Street to the bridge.
  • [[BRIDGE WARD WITHIN receives its name from its contiguity to London Bridge, and from being within the City. It is bounded on the south by the Thames, on the east by Billingsgate ward, on the north by Langbourn ward, and on the west by Candlewick and Dowgate wards. It begins at the south end of London Bridge; extends northward up Gracechurch Street to the corner of Lombard Street, including all the bridge, the greatest part of the courts and alleys on the east side of Gracechurch Street, and all the alleys, courts and lanes in Upper Thames Street, as far as New Quay, part of St. Michael's Lane, and part of Crooked Lane. The principal Streets in this ward are New Fish Street, Fish Street Hill, and Gracechurch Street; and the principal buildings are London Bridge, new and old; the parish churches of St. Magnus and St. Bennett's, Gracechurch Street; Fishmongers' Hall, now about to be pulled down, and the Monument. - [see these several places and buildings]

This ward is governed by an alderman, John Garratt, Esq., who, as Lord Mayor, laid the first stone of New London Bridge, a deputy and fourteen other common councilmen, and other ward officers.

  • BRIDGE WARD WITHOUT, so called from being without the liberties of the City, contains the whole of the Borough of Southwark. - [see Borough, The]

It is nominally governed by an alderman, whose office is a sinecure, and, therefore given always to the senior alderman, who, on the death of his predecessor, vacates his former ward, and takes that of Bridge Without, as a matter of course. The present aldermen of this ward, and father of the Corporation, is Sir Richard Carr Glyn, Bart., who was chosen for the ward of Bishopsgate in 1790, served sheriff the same year, and lord mayor in 1798, but removed to this ward upon the death of Sir William Curtis, Bart., in 1829.

  • BRIDGES, THE]], over the Thames. - [see Blackfriars, London, Southwark, Vauxhall, Waterloo and Westminster Bridges]
  • BRIDGEWATER GARDENS, Bridgewater Square, are on the north side, and extend from Brackley Street, Golden Lane, to Fan Street, Goswell Street.
  • BRIDGEWATER SQUARE, Barbican, is at the north end of Princes Street, going from No. 42, Barbican. It leads to Bridgewater Gardens. It derives its name from being on the site of the ancient mansion, and gardens of the Earls of Bridgewater.
  • BRIGHTON PLACE, Kent Road, forms part of the south side of that road, a few yards on the right hand going from the Elephant and Castle, and opposite Rockingham Row.
  • BRIGHTON PLACE, Hackney Road, forms part of the right hand side of this road, about one third of a mile on the right from Shoreditch Church.
  • BRIGHTON PLACE, Brixton, is in Commercial Place, Brixton R&#0;???oad, leading from the Camberwell New Road to Streatham.
  • BRIGHTON STREET, Burton Crescent, turns off at No. 107, Cromer Street, Judd Street, Burton Crescent.
  • BRILL PLACE, Somers Town, is at the north side of the Brill, facing Skinner Street, or the first turning on the left hand in Brill Row, towards Camden Town; there is another entrance at No. 16, Chapel Path.
  • BRILL ROW, Somers Town, is at the north side of the Brill aforesaid, and extends northward to the crescent.
  • BRILL TERRACE, Somers Town, is the north continuation, or part of Brill Row.
  • BRISSENDEN BUILDINGS, Pimlico, is the first three or four houses on the right hand in Brewer Street.
  • BRISTOW PLACE, Blackfriars, is a turning in Bristow Street, St. Andrew's Hill.
  • BRISTOW STREET, Blackfriars, is the first turning on the left on St. Andrew's Hill from Earl Street, and is continued by Huish Court to Water Lane.
  • BRITAIN COURT, Ratcliffe Highway, turns off between Nos. 177 and 178, and leads to Princes Square.
  • BRITAIN, LITTLE]], Aldersgate Street, turns off at No. 175, and is the first turning on the left from St. Martin's-le-Grand, it leads into St. Bartholomew's Hospital on the left, and to Duke Street and West Smithfield on the right. It was formerly called Britain, or Bretagne Street, from the mansion of the Duke of Bretagne, which stood near St. Botolph's Church, but it has been destroyed many years. This street was also in former times, the residence of many of the nobility. The Earl of Peterborough's house stood at the corner, where the south part of St. Bartholomew's Hospital now stands, and the whole of the east side of the street was occupied by a mansion belonging to Lord Montague, the name of which is still preserved in Montague Court.
  • BRITANNIA COURT, Lambeth, is in Mason Street, the third turning on the left from No. 30, Bridge Road, near Westminster Bridge.
  • BRITANNIA COURT, Golden Lane, Cripplegate, is the second turning on the right, about six houses from Barbican.
  • BRITANNIA GARDENS, Hoxton, are parallel northward to part of Old Street Road, and about a quarter of a mile distant. They extend from the back of the Britannia Tea Gardens, Hoxton Town, to Haberdashers' Walk.
  • BRITANNIA PLACE, Limehouse, is in the Commercial Road, on the west side of the turnpike near the bridge.
  • [[BRITANNIA ROW. - 1. is in Lambeth Marsh. - 2. is in Lower Street, Islington.
  • BRITANNIA STREET, Gray's Inn Lane, is at the north end, near King's Cross, Battle Bridge, and Pentonville, nearly a mile on the right from Middle Row, Holborn.
  • [[BRITE'S or BRIT'S BUILDINGS. - 1. Finsbury, is in Long Alley, Moorfields, the forth turning on the right from Worship Street, going towards Sun Street or Crown Street. - 2. is in Hoxton, at the north end of Haberdashers' Walk.
  • BRIT'S STREET, Sampson's Gardens, Wapping, is the second turning on the right hand in Globe Street, from No. 60, Wapping Street; it leads to the London Docks.
  • BRITISH COPPER COMPANY, Offices and Warehouses, are at No. 68, Upper Thames Street, about the middle of the south side, three or four doors west from Queen Street.

\par

  • BRITISH FIRE OFFICE, No. 429, Strand, and No. 35, Cornhill, This company was instituted in 1799 for assuring houses, goods and ships. It is under the management of a Chairman, Sir George H. Sumner; twenty Directors; a Secretary, John Helps, Esq.; and an Solicitor, William H. Williams, Esq.
  • BRITISH INSTITUTION, GALLERY OF]], is about thirteen, houses on the left from St. James's Street. It was originally built by the late Alderman Boydell for his celebrated Shakspeare Gallery, from the designs of the late George Dance, Esq. The beautiful basso rilievo in the front, representing the Apotheosis of Shakspeare, is from the chisel of the late Mr. Banks. This useful society, which is established for promoting the Fine Arts in the United Kingdom, was founded the 4th of June (King George the Third's birthday), 1805, and was first opened to the public on the 18th of January, 1806. Its present officers are. The King, Patron; the Earl of Aberdeen, President; Lord Farnborough, Deputy President; the members of the royal family, and a long list of nobility and gentry, Governors; the Dukes of Bedford and Devonshire, the Marquesses of Bute and Lansdowne, the Earls of Brownlow, Cowper, Dartmouth, Mulgrave and Spencer, Sir Thomas Baring, Bart., Sir Robert Peel, Bart., and seven other gentlemen, Directors; Sir Scrope Bernard Morland, Bart., M.P., Treasurer; Charles Beloe, Esq., Secretary; and William Barnard, Esq., Keeper, Among the subscribers are a long list of nobility and gentry of 100 guineas each, and Mr. Soane the architect, 500 guineas.
  • BRITISH LYING-IN HOSPITAL, THE]], is situated at No. 34, Brownlow Street, Drury Lane, which turns off at about twenty houses on the west or right hand side, going from Holborn.

This institution was established in November, 1749, under the name of \\ldblquote The Lying-in Hospital for married Women,\\rdblquote under the patronage of the (then) Duke of Portland. The first patients were received on the 7th December of the same year, and the distinctive epithet \\ldblquote British\\rdblquote was added in 1756. The management of the institution is under the care of a committee, who meet every Friday at the hospital. Female pupils are taught and receive practice in midwifery, under the care of the medical officers, and suitable lectures are delivered, which are illustrated by preparations. The following are the present officers: her Majesty Queen Adelaide, Patroness; the Duke of Portland, President; the Duke of Wellington, Earl Spencer, Lord Willoughby de Eresby and Viscount Clifden, Vice Presidents; Henry Hoare, Esq., Treasurer; John Foley, M.D., Consulting Physician; Henry Davies, M.D., Physician; Thomas A. Stone, Esq., Surgeon; the Rev. Morgan Hughes, M.A., Chaplain; George Truwhitt and William Yewd, Joint Secretaries; Elizabeth Bridge, Matron.

  • BRITISH MUSEUM, THE]], Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury, is the first large building on the right hand going from Bloomsbury Square towards Bedford Square. This great and useful national institution emanated from the liberality of Sir Hans Sloane, who merits the honour of being considered its founder. The museum which this public spirited man left to the nation, cost him upwards of \\'a350,000, and he bequeathed it at his death, which occurred the 11th of January 1753, on condition that parliament paid his executors \\'a320,000, and purchased a house sufficiently commodious for its reception. The parliament readily embraced the offer, and passed an act \\ldblquote for the purchase of the museum, or collection of Sir Hans Sloane, and of the Harleian collection of manuscripts; and for providing one general repository for the better&#0;??? reception and more convenient use of the said collections, and of the famous Cotton library, and of the additions made and to be made thereto.\\rdblquote The government immediately raised the sum of \\'a3100,000 by lottery, purchased and established the museum under its present name, and appointed governors and trustees according to the tenor of the founder's will. The trustees shortly afterwards purchased the mansion and gardens of the Montague family for \\'a310,000, upon which they expended nearly \\'a330,000 more in necessary repairs, alterations and conveniencies tor the reception of the united collection. This mansion, called Montagu House, was erected by John Duke of Montague, keeper of the wardrobe to Charles II., and who was afterwards in high favour with King William and Queen Anne. The assertion in my life of Sir Christopher Wren, that it was designed and built by Robert Hooke, the inventor of spring clocks and pocket watches, has been contradicted; but it has been corroborated by John Evelyn, who in his Memoirs (vol. i. page 484) says, \\ldblquote May 11th - I dined with Mr. Charlton, and went to see Mr. Mountague's palace neere Bloomsbury, built by Mr. Hooke of our society, after the French manner.\\rdblquote

The original collection has been much enlarged by numerous and valuable additions to every department of the Museum, by donations, legacies and judicious purchases by the trustees, aided by the liberality of parliament King George the Third gave many munificent donations, among which are a large and valuable collection of pamphlets published during the eventful reign of Charles I. Among others should be enumerated the collection of Biography presented by Sir William Musgrave; the entire library of Clayton Cracherode Esq.; Mr. Garrick's collection of Old Plays; the Hamilton Vases; the Egyptian Antiquities; the Townley, the Elgin and the Phygaleian Marbles; and, \\ldblquote though last not least,\\rdblquote his late Majesty King George the Fourth's splendid and munificent gift of the private library of his late father, which had become his private property by bequest.

The original building has also been enlarged by the gallery of the Townley Marbles, designed by Mr. Saunders; the temporary galleries of the Elgin and Phygaleian Marbles; the new reading rooms; and those for George the Fourth's library, designed by Mr. Smirke. These additions are still in progress, and the old buildings will be progressively taken down and rebuilt, from time to time, after one uniform design, by Mr. Smirke.

The present officers of the British Museum are, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Lord Chancellor, the Lord President of the Council, the First Lord of the Treasury, the Lord Privy Seal, the First Lord of the Admiralty, the Lord High Steward, the Lord Chamberlain, the Speaker of the House of Commons, the three principal Secretaries of State, the Bishop of London, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, the Master of the Rolls, the Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, the Attorney and Solicitor General, and the Presidents of the Royal Society, College of Physicians, Society of Antiquaries, and Royal Academy, for the time being, ex officio Trustees; nine family trustees, representing the families of Sloane, Cotton, Harley, Townley, Elgin and Knight, of which the present are, the Rev. Arthur Annesley and George Booth Tyndale, Esq., for the Cotton family; Lord H. W. Bentinck and the Hon. Cr. Agar Ellis, for the Harley; Peregrine Edward Townley, Esq., for the Townley; the Earl of Elgin, for the Elgin; Thomas Andrew Knight, Esq., for the Knight; and that for the Sloane is at present vacant. There are also fifteen elected Trustees, chosen by the other two classes, which at present are, the Duke of Rutland, the Marquesses of Stafford, Lansdowne and Camden, the Earls Spencer, Hardwicke, Ashburnham, Harrowby and Aberdeen; the Lords Grenville, Farborough, Stowell and St. Helens; Hen&#0;???ry Banks, Esq., M.P. and Alexander Baring, Esq., M.P. The other officers are, Henry Ellis, Esq., F.R.S., Principal Librarian; the Rev. Josiah Forshall, Keeper of the Manuscripts; Frederick Madden, Assistant; the Rev. Henry Barber, M.A., Keeper of the Printed Books; Nicholas Carlisle, Esq., Second Keeper; the Rev. Henry Carey, M.A., William Armstrong and John H. Glover, Assistants; F. A. Blitt, Extra Assistant; Edward Hawkins, Esq., F.R.S., Keeper of the Antiquities and Coins; Charles F. Barnwell, Assistant; J. T. Smith, Extra Assistant and Keeper of the Collection of Prints; Charles Konig, Esq., F.R.S., Keeper of the Natural History; John O. Children, Assistant; Robert Browne, Esq., F.R.S., Keeper of the Banksian Botanical Collection; the Rev. Josiah Forshall, Secretary; J. Scotney, Accountant; and Messrs. Bray and Warren, Solicitors.

  • BRITISH PENSION FUND, Queen Street, Cheapside, is an institution for the purpose of granting monthly pensions of \\'a32. to males and \\'a31. 8s. to females, to poor and aged tradesmen, artisans, clerks, shopmen, porters, the widows of such persons, and to male and female servants residing within twelve miles of London. John Fox, Esq., Honorary Secretary.
  • BRITISH SOCIETY FOR REWARDING SERVANTS, is held at No. 11, Waterloo Place, the wide street that leads from the Strand to Waterloo Bridge. It was established in 1792, and R. S. Illingworth, Esq., is the Secretary.
  • BRITISH AND FOREIGN SCHOOL SOCIETY, THE]], is situated in the Borough Road, leading from the Obelisk by the Surrey Theatre to the Stones End in the Borough. It is a large substantial building, consisting of a dwelling house for the master and mistress, committee and board rooms, and spacious schools in the wings for the children; erected from the designs of Samuel Robinson, Esq. This society is founded on the principles of Joseph Lancaster, and is open to all religions, while the National Society is on those of Dr. Bell, and exclusively devoted to the established Church of England. Lancaster opened his school in 1798, and this society was established in 1808, and remodelled in 1813. Mr. Highmore in his two works on public charities, namely, the Pietas Londinensis and Philanthropia Metropolitana, has given most copious and interesting accounts of this society and its operations in different parts of the globe. The titles of the society at the time of the before named alteration of its regulations was, \\ldblquote The Institution for promoting the British System for the Education of the Labouring and Manufacturing Classes of Society of every Religious Persuasion;\\rdblquote and it furnishes instruction to all persons, whether natives or foreigners, who may be sent from time to time to the school, and for the purpose of being qualified as teachers in this or any other country. It is open to the children of parents of all religious denominations, for reading, writing, arithmetic, and needle work. The lessons for reading consist of extracts from the holy scriptures; no catechisms or peculiar religious tenets are taught; but every child enjoined and expected to attend regularly the place of worship to which the parents belong. In 1814, the title of the society was altered by motion of the late Mr. Whitbread, to \\ldblquote The British and Foreign School Society,\\rdblquote and various other amendments and alterations adopted.

The present officers of this institution are the King, Patron; H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex and Prince Leopold, Vice Patrons; the Duchess of Kent, Patroness of the female department; the Duchess of Bedford, and eight other ladies of distinction, Vice Patronesses; the Duke of Bedford, President; the Marquess of Lansdowne, and twenty-two other noble men and gentlemen, Vice Presidents; William Allen, Esq., Treasur&#0;???er; David D. Scott, Esq., Secretary; the Rev. Dr. Schwabe, Foreign Secretary; James Millar, Esq., Assistant Secretary; Mr. Pitkin, Resident Schoolmaster; and Mr. Joseph Chater, Collector.

  • [[BRITISH AND FOREIGN SEAMANS' AND SOLDIERS' FRIEND SOCIETY. - [see Bethel Union]
  • BRITISH SOCIETY, THE]], for promoting the religious principles of the reformation, was established in 1827, and holds its meetings at No. 32, Sackville Street, Piccadilly, R. Williams, Esq., M.P., is Treasurer; and E. Gordon and W. G. Rhynd, Secretaries.
  • BRITT'S BUILDING, Hoxton, is in Gloucester Place, at the north end of Haberdashers' Walk, near the Haberdashers' Alms Houses.
  • BRITT STREET, Wapping, is in Sampson's Gardens, the second turning on the right from Globe Street.
  • BROAD ARROW COURT, St. Luke's, is the third turning on the right in Milton Street formerly Grub Street, and bout ten houses from Chiswell Street.
  • BROAD BRIDGE, Shadwell High Street, is at No. 87, the fifth turning on the right below the church, and leading to Dean Street.
  • [[BROAD COURT. - 1. is in Drury Lane, at No. 43, near Long Acre; it leads into Bow Street, Covent Garden, by the theatre. - 2. is in Parker Street, the first turning on the left from No. 162, Drury Lane. - 3. is in Duke's Place, Houndsditch. - 4. is in Turnmill Street, Cow Cross.
  • BROAD PLACE, Shoreditch, is at the back or east side of the church, extending from Austin Street to Castle Street, and is continued by Cock Lane into Church Street.
  • BROAD SANCTUARY, Westminster, is on the north side of the Abbey, it extends from King Street to Tothill Street. It derives its name from having been formerly a sanctuary or place of refuge.
  • BROAD STREET, St. Giles's, or Bloomsbury, is the west continuation of Holborn, extending from Drury Lane to the church, the north side is in Bloomsbury, and the south side in St. Giles's parish.
  • BROAD STREET, Golden Square, turns off at No. 86, Berwick Street, the third turning on the right from No. 372, Oxford Street. It extends from Berwick Street to Marshall Street, Golden Square.
  • BROAD STREET, OLD]], Threadneedle Street, is the first turning on the left from the north east corner of the Royal Exchange; it extends to London Wall, and is about the fifth of a mile in length.
  • BROAD STREET, NEW]], extends from the north end of Old Broad Street, opposite Bishopsgate Churchyard to Broker's Row, Moorfields, and is also the continuation of Old Broad Street to Broad Street Buildings.
  • BROAD STREET BUILDINGS, are the north continuation of Old, and part of New Broad Street, and lead into Liverpool Street. These Streets give name to the ward wherein they stand, which is bounded on the north and east by Bishopsgate Ward; on the west by Coleman Street Ward; and on the south by Cornhill Ward. The principal Streets in Broad Street Ward are, Threadneedle Street, pa&#0;???rt of Princes Street, Lothbury, from the church to Bartholomew Lane, Throgmorton Street, Broad street, from the Church of St. Bennet's Fink to London Wall, London Wall as far as Cross Key's Buildings, Austin Friars, Winchester Street, and Wormwood Street, as far as Helmet Court. The most remarkable building are, the parish churches of St. Christopher, St. Bennet's Fink, St. Martin's Outwich, St. Peter's-le-Poor, and Allhallows in the Wall, Carpenters' Hall, Drapers' Hall, Merchant Tailors Hall, the Bank of England, the South Sea House, and Pinners' Hall. - [see those places]

This ward is under the government of an alderman, (Sir John Perring, Bart.) a deputy, and nine other common councilmen, and other ward officers.

  • BROAD STREET, Ratcliffe, is the east continuation of Ratcliffe Highway, at Butchers' Row, and Shadwell High Street; it extends from Cock Hill to Ratcliffe Cross.
  • BROAD STREET, Lambeth, extends from Lambeth Butts (between Vauxhall Walk and Lambeth Walk) to the Thames, nearly a quarter of a mile southward of the church.
  • BROAD STREET, Horselydown is the east continuation of Tooley Street, at No. 17, Back Street, to John Street.
  • BROAD STREET CHAMBERS, Old Broad Street, are at No. 37, opposite Winchester Street, by the north side of the Excise Office.
  • BROAD WALL, Blackfriars' Road, is at the west end of Stamford Street, and extends from Old Barge Stairs, Upper Ground Street, to Charlotte Street, Lambeth Marsh.
  • BROADWAY, Westminster, is at the west end of Tothill Street, going from the Abbey, and the east end of York Street and James Street, from Buckingham Gate.
  • BROADWAY, Blackfriars, is the first turning on the left in Cock Court, from No. 19, Ludgate Street, opposite the Old Bailey; it is continued by Water Lane to Earl Street, by the bridge.
  • BROADWAY STREET, Southwark, is the first turning on the left in St. Thomas's Street, going from No. 43, High Street; it leads to Dean Street, New Way, and the Maze.
  • [[BROAD YARD. - 1. is in Turnmill Street, Clerkenwell, about fifteen houses on the left from the Sessions' House, and nearly opposite Castle Street. - 2. is in Cow Heel Alley, Whitecross Street, St. Luke's, the first turning on the left from No. 168, Whitecross Street, towards Golden Lane. - 3. is in Blackman Street, Borough, at No. 69, and leading to Great Suffolk Street, by the King's Bench. - 4. is in Holywell Lane, Shoreditch. - 5. is in St. John's Street, Smithfield.
  • [[BRODERERS' HALL. [see Embroiderers' Hall]
  • BROKEN WHARF, Upper Thames Street, is between No. 40 and 41, opposite Old Fish Street Hill, about a third of a mile eastward of or below Blackfriars' Bridge.
  • BROKERS' ALLEY, Drury Lane, turns off at No. 25, nearly opposite Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, and leads into Castle Street, Long Acre.
  • BROMLEY PLACE, Fitzroy Square, is in Conway Street, three houses on the left hand from London Street.
  • BROMPTON, is a hamlet in the parish of Kensington, which commences at the west end of Sloane Street, at the third coach turning on the left, or about a quarter of a mile from Hyde Park Corner.
  • BROMPTON CHAPEL, is about the middle of Brompton Row, nearly a qua&#0;???rter of a mile on the right hand from Knightsbridge, and about two thirds of a mile from Hyde Park Corner.
  • BROMPTON CRESCENT, is at the back of Michael's Place, about half a mile on the left hand from Knightsbridge; it extends from Michael's Grove to the Fulham Road.
  • BROMPTON GROVE, Brompton, is about seven houses on the south east side of the road, rather more than a quarter of a mile on the left hand from Knightsbridge, opposite No. 28, Brompton Row.
  • BROMPTON ROW, Brompton, is part of the right hand or north west side of the road, commencing about a furlong on the right hand side of the way going from Knightsbridge, and leading towards Fulham.
  • BROMPTON SQUARE, Brompton, is a newly built square on the right hand side of the Brompton Road.
  • BROMPTON TERRACE, Knightsbridge, is part of the south east side of the road, about a furlong on the left hand going from Knightsbridge; it extends from Queen's Buildings to Queen Street.
  • BRONTI PLACE, Walworth, is in East Street, turning off at No. 26, Richmond Street.
  • BROOKES' CLUB HOUSE, St. James's Street, is a subscription house at No. 61, consisting of 500 members. J. Wheelwright, Esq., is Secretary.
  • [[BROOK'S COURT. - 1. is in Holborn, the north west corner of Brook's Market, in Brook Street; it leads into Bell Court and Gray's Inn Lane. - 2. is in Brook Street, Lambeth, about twelve houses on the left hand from Little Moor Place, going towards West Square. - 3. is in Brothers' Row, High Street, Lambeth, the first turning on the left, a few yards from High Street. - 4. is in Upper Lambeth Marsh, the first turning on the left from the turnpike, going towards Stangate Street, and leading into Carlisle Lane. - 5. is in Vine Yard, St. Olave's, the third turning on the right hand from the east end of Tooley Street, going towards Pickle Herring Stairs.
  • BROOKE'S GARDENS, Hampstead Road, are at the west end of Henry Street, on the right hand side of the road.
  • BROOKE'S GARDENS, Coldbath Fields, are at the back of Brooke's Place, on the road from Clerkenwell to Pentonville.
  • BROOK'S MARKET, Holborn, is the north end of Brook's Street, going from Holborn, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from Farringdon Street.
  • BROOK'S MEWS, Davies Street, Berkeley Square, are at No. 46, five houses southward of No. 40, Brook Street; it leads into Avery Row.
  • BROOK'S MEWS, Cleaver Street, Kennington Cross, is the first turning on the right from the White Hart, going towards Princes Street.
  • BROOK'S PLACE, Kennington Cross, is facing Upper Kennington Lane, and forms part of the east side of the road between the White Hart and Kennington Green.
  • BROOK'S PLACE, Clerkenwell, is a short row of small houses by Bagnigge Wells, about half a mile northward of the Sessions' House, going towards Pentonville and Battle Bridge.
  • BROOKE'S PLACE, Hampstead Road, is the first turning on the left in Little Charles Street, and five houses from No. 16, Mary Street, near the west end of Charles Street, Hampstead Road.
  • BROOK STREET, Fitzroy Square, is the first turning on the right hand in the New Road, from Tottenham Court Road, going towards Paddington and leading into Charles Street and Hampstead Road.
  • BROOK STREET, LITTLE]], Fitzroy Square, is the second turning on the left hand in Brook Street, from the New Road nearly opposite Charles Street, Hampstead Road.
  • BROOK STREET, Holborn, turns up on the north side at No. 140, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from St. Andrew's Church; it leads into Brook's Market.

This street and market derive their name from standing on the site of Brook House, the ancient residence of Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook.

  • BROOK STREET, Grosvenor Square, extends from the north east corner of that square to New Bond Street, it is nearly a quarter of a mile in length.
  • BROOK STREET, LITTLE]], Hanover Square, reaches from the south west corner of the square into New Bond Street, opposite Brook Street, Grosvenor Square.
  • BROOK STREET, UPPER]], Grosvenor Square, extends from the north west corner of the square into Park Lane.
  • BROOK STREET, Ratcliffe, is the east continuation of Back Lane and Sun Tavern Fields, also the first turning on the north, parallel to Cock Hill and Broad Street; it extends from Love Lane to Butcher Row and White Horse Street.
  • BROOK STREET, Walcot Place, Lambeth, is about two thirds of a mile on the left hand going from Westminster Bridge, leading from Little Moor Place (opposite Lambeth New Chapel) to South Street and West Square.
  • BROOK'S WHARF LANE, Upper Thames Street, turns down to the Thames at No. 51, nearly opposite Bread Street Hill.
  • [[BROOK'S WHARF. - 1. is in Upper Thames Street, at the bottom of the above named lane. Its present proprietor is Mr. Allen Mason, who receives goods at this wharf to and from Maidstone, Oxford, Gloucester, Bath, Marlow, Henley, Hertford, Guildford, Basingstoke, Farnham, Reading, Tetbury, Birmingham, Wolverhampton and all their respective vicinities. - 2. is in Willow Street, Bankside, and situated between Pye Gardens and Love Lane, rather more than a quarter of a mile from the Surrey end of Blackfriars' Bridge. - 3. is on the right hand side of Weaver's Lane, Southwark, going from No. 119, Tooley Street, nearly a quarter of a mile from London Bridge.
  • [[BROOK'S YARD. - 1. is Angel Alley, Moorfields, the second turning on the right hand north of Sun Street, Bishopsgate. - 2. is in Upper Thames Street, near Lambeth Hill. - 3. is in Fore Street, Lambeth, near the church.
  • BROOM ALLEY, Whitechapel Road, turns off at No. 63, two houses eastward of Great Garden Street.
  • BROTHERS' BUILDINGS, Mary-le-bone, is in Ogle Court, Foley Street, Portland Chapel, the first turning on the left hand going from Queen Anne Street, and the first on the right from Upper Mary-le-bone Street.
  • BROTHERS' ROW, High Street, Lambeth, is the fourth turning on the right hand going from the church; it leads into Fore Street.
  • [[BROWN'S BUILDINGS. - 1. is in Stanhope Street, Clare Market, about three houses northward of White Horse Yard, Drury Lane. - 2. is in St. Mary Axe, the first turning on the right hand going from Leadenhall Street; it leads into Bury Street. - 3. is in Chancery Lane. - 4. is in Princes Street, Rosemary Lane, the first turning on the left hand from Rosemary Lane, at the east end of Glasshouse Yard, Minories. - 5. are in Upper East Smithfield, at No. 116, the first turning eastward of Butler's Buildings, and nearly opposite Night&#0;???ingale Lane. - 6. are in Glean Alley, Tooley Street, at the further end of Joiners' Street going from Tooley Street. - 7. are at No. 6, Clifton Street, Finsbury. - 8. are in Green Street, Blackfriars' Road. - 9. are in Holywell Street, Shoreditch.
  • [[BROWN'S COURT. - 1. is in the Edgeware Road, at the back of Winchester Row, about a third of a mile on the right hand from Connaught Terrace. - 2. is in North Row, North Audley Street, at No. 22, leading to No. 10, Green Street. - 3. is in Carnaby Market, at the north east corner. - 4. is in Angel Place, Skinner Street, Bishopsgate; the second turning on the right from Long Alley, opposite Brewhouse Yard. - 5. is in Great Ayliffe Street, Goodman's Fields, the first turning on the right hand, about four houses westwards of Red Lion Street, Whitechapel. - 6. is in James Street, St. Luke's, the first turning on the right from No. 37, Featherstone Street. - 7. is in Long Lane, Bermondsey, the fourth turning on the right from Kent Street. - 8. is near King and Queen's Stairs, Rotherhithe. - 9. is at No. 25, North Row, Park Street, Grosvenor Square. - 10. is in the Old Bailey. - 11. is at No. 40, Ray Street, Clerkenwell. - 12. is in Titchborne Street, Haymarket.
  • BROWN'S LANE, Spitalfields, is opposite No. 55, Brick Lane, a few houses southward of Hanbury's Brewery; it leads into Lamb Street, Spital Square, and Bishopsgate Street Without.
  • BROWN'S PASSAGE, Green Street, North Audley Street, is the first turning on the left hand going from North Audley Street; it leads into Lee's Mews.
  • BROWN'S QUAY, Wapping, is opposite No. 7, Wapping Street, by Hermitage Bridge.
  • BROWN'S WHARF, Tooley Street, takes and receives goods to and from Thorpe-le-Soken, Kirby, Walton, Oakley, Great Bentley, Wheeley, and their respective vicinities.
  • BROWN STREET, Grosvenor Square, is parallel to part of the north side of the square, and the second south parallel to Oxford Street, about a quarter of a mile on the right from Hyde Park, extending from No. 36, Duke Street to George Street.
  • BROWN STREET, Bunhill Row, is a part of the east side beginning at No. 60, Featherstone Street.
  • BROWN STREET, Upper George Street, Edgeware Road, is about thirteen houses on the left hand going from No. 45, Edgeware Road, and five houses on the right hand from Adam Street, West, Cumberland Place.
  • BROWN STREET, LOWER]], is at No, 14, King Street, Westminster.
  • BROWNLOW STREET, Holborn, turns off at No. 50, on the north side nearly opposite Chancery Lane, and leads into Bedford Row.
  • BROWNLOW STREET, Drury Lane, is at No. 20, on the west side near Holborn and Broad Street, Bloomsbury; it leads into Old Belton Street. In this street is the British Lying-in Hospital. - [see British Lying-in Hospital]
  • BRUNSWICK CHAPEL, Portman Square, is an episcopal chapel of ease, situated on the north side of Upper Berkeley Street, between Quebec Street and Cumberland Place.
  • [[BRUNSWICK COURT. - 1. is in Brunswick Street, Christ Church, Surrey, at No. 34, and leads into Green Walk. - 2. is at No. 4, Artillery Street, Horselydown.
  • BRUNSWICK MARITIME ESTABLISHMENT, or Sailor's Home, was founded in 1829, for the reception of houseless sailors. The society are about building a suitable establishment on the site of the late Brunswick Theatre, but have at present a warehouse near Wellclose Square.
  • BRUNSWICK MEWS, Wilmot Street, Brunswick Square, are at No. 8, the first turning on the right hand from Oxford Street, and four houses from Upper Berkeley Street.
  • [[BRUNSWICK PLACE. - 1. is in the City Road, about a quarter of a mile northward of Finsbury Square, the first turning on the right hand from Old Street; it leads into Charles Street, Hoxton. - 2. is in Brunswick Street, Christ Church, at No. 17, on the north side near Green Walk. - 3. is in the Regent's Park. - 4. is in the Kent Road, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand below the Bricklayers Arms, and adjoining East Lane, Kent Road. - 5. is in the Hackney Road. - 6. is in the Brompton Road. - 7. is in the Grange Road. - 8. is in Bowyer Lane, Camberwell. - 9. is in Southampton Street, Camberwell. - 10. is in Back Church Lane, Whitechapel. - 11. is in Craven Buildings, Hoxton. - 12. is in Caroline Street, Commercial Road. - 13. is at No. 9, County Terrace, New Kent Road.
  • [[BRUNSWICK ROW. - 1. is at the north west corner of Queen Square, Bloomsbury. - 2. is in the Horse Ferry Road, Westminster, and is part of the west end of that road. It extends from Strutton Ground and Great Peter Street to the Bridewell, nearly opposite the Grey coat school. - 3. is in Brunswick Street, Blackfriars' Road, at the south end of Collingwood Street. - 4. is in Spencer Row, Palmer's Village, Westminster.
  • BRUNSWICK SQUARE, is a square built on land belonging to the Foundling Hospital, situate on the north side of Great Guilford Street, the first entrance from which is in Lansdowne Place, on the west side of the Foundling Hospital, the courtyard wall of which forms its eastern side.
  • BRUNSWICK STREET, Blackwall, is near Blackwall Causeway, at the corner of Poplar High Street.
  • BRUNSWICK STREET, Stamford Street, Blackfriars' Road, is at No. 12, and leads into Green Walk by Christ Church.
  • BRUNSWICK STREET, LITTLE]], Christ Church, Surrey, is the south continuation of the last from Green Walk to Cross Street.
  • BRUNSWICK STREET, Hackney Road, is nearly opposite Brighton Place, rather more than a quarter of a mile on the left hand from Shoreditch Church.
  • BRUNSWICK STREET, Shoreditch, is in Webb Square, about a quarter of a mile southward of the church.
  • BRUTON MEWS, North Bruton Street, is the continuation of Little Bruton Street into Bruton Place.
  • BRUTON PLACE, Berkeley Square, turns off at No. 22, the north west corner of the square, and leads into Bruton Mews and Little Bruton Street.
  • BRUTON STREET, Berkeley Square, extends from the east side of the square into New Bond Street.
  • BRUTON STREET, LITTLE]], is the first turning on the right in the last described, and about three houses from No. 146, New Bond Street. It leads into Bruton Mews and Berkeley Square.
  • BRYANSTONE SQUARE, is a long narrow handsome square, built on the estate of Edward Bryanstone Portman, Esq., a little to the north west of Portman Square, and near to George Street.
  • BRYANSTONE STREET, Portman Square, is the first Street parallel to, and northward of Oxford Street, it extends from No. 19, Portman Street to Great Cumberland Street near Connaught Terrace.
  • BRYANSTONE STREET, UPPER]], is the west continuation of the last street, from Great Cumberland Street to the Edgware Road, and is the first turning on the right hand in the same road, above Connaught Terrace.
  • BRYDGES STREET, Covent Garden, is the continuation northward of Catherine Street, which leads from No. 342, Strand, to Great Russell Street, by Drury Lane Theatre.
  • BRYON'S BUILDINGS, Stangate, Lambeth, is at the north end of the Bishop's Walk, near the Surrey side of Westminster Bridge.
  • BUCK'S BUILDINGS, Hoxton, is about a quarter of a mile on the left from Old Street Road, and the first turning on the left in Pimlico, from the High Street.
  • BUCK'S HEAD COURT, Great Distaff Lane, 18 three houses on the right hand from No. 31, Old Change, by St. Paul's Churchyard.
  • BUCK'S ROW, Whitechapel Road, is in Ducking Pond Row, Greyhound Lane, and a part of the north side of the High Road.
  • BUCKBRIDGE or BUCKERIDGE STREET, Bloomsbury, is at No. 26, in the High Street, the first turning on the right hand from the church, going towards Oxford Street.
  • BUCKINGHAM COURT, Charing Cross, is at No. 36, the north side the Admiralty, and leads into Spring Gardens.
  • BUCKINGHAM GATE, St. James's Park, is at the west end of it by the New Palace, now building.
  • BUCKINGHAM GATE, Buckingham Street, Strand, at the south end of it, by the Thames. It is the work of Inigo Jones, and a masterpiece of architecture.
  • BUCKINGHAM PALACE, St. James's Park, is on the west side of the park, about one third of a mile from St. James's Palace. The first edifice on this spot is called Arlington House, which being purchased by the Duke of Buckingham, he rebuilt it in 1703, and named it Buckingham House. In 1762, it was purchased by George the Third, as a residence for his consort. Queen Charlotte, when it obtained the name of the Queen's Palace, having been settled on Her Majesty in 1775, in lieu of Somerset House. The greater part of it has been taken down by command of George the Fourth, and is being rebuilt by Mr. Nash, in a style more remarkable for singularity than for either taste or beauty.
  • BUCKINGHAM PLACE, Fitzroy Square, is on the west side of the square, and is the continuation of Cleveland Street from Carburton Street to the New Road.
  • BUCKINGHAM ROW, James Street, Westminster, is at the east end of that street, nearly opposite the Blue Coat School, about a quarter of a mile on the right from Buckingham palace.
  • BUCKINGHAM STREET, Adelphi, turns down at No. 38 in the Strand, about one six&#0;???th of a mile on the left hand going towards Charing Cross; it leads towards the Thames. At the bottom of this street is Inigo Jones's celebrated water gate, formerly called York Stairs, and sometimes Buckingham Water Gate. The street and gate takes its name from John Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, whose palace stood on its site.
  • BUCKINGHAM STREET, Fitzroy Square, extends from Buckingham Place to Upper Norton Street, near the New Road.
  • BUCKLE STREET, Goodman's Fields, is at No. 35, Red Lion Street, the second turning on the left hand from Whitechapel, and extends to Plough Street.
  • BUCKLERSBURY, Cheapside, is a short street nearly opposite the Old Jewry on the right hand side of Cheapside, and leads to Charlotte Row at the side of the Mansion house. Maitland, the city historian, says the proper name of this street is Bucklesbury, from a manor and tenements belonging to a person of the name of Buckles, who dwelt and kept his courts there; and bury being the name of a manorial dwelling house. This was a spacious stone mansion, known, in the days of signs, by the name of the Old Barge by Wall Brook, to which, according to tradition, boats and barges came from the Thames up the Wall Brook, when its navigation was open. The presumed site of this mansion is still called Barge Yard, Bucklersbury.

In Shakspeare's days Bucklersbury must have been a herb market, for he compares a sweet odour to smelling \\ldblquote like Bucklersbury in simpling\\'86 time.\\rdblquote At the west end of the Poultry, where Bucklersbury meets Cheapside, formerly stood the great conduit, which brought water from the conduit mead near Oxford Road and Paddington.

  • BUCKLER'S RENTS, Rotherhithe, are near Rotherhithe Wall, a short distance from St. Saviour's Dock.
  • BUCKLEY COURT, High Street, Bloomsbury, is at No. 10, nearly opposite St. Giles's Church, and leads into Church Lane.
  • BUDGE ROW, Watling Street, is the east continuation of that street to Cannon Street; it extends from St. Antholin's Church, Size Lane, to Walbrook.
  • [[BULL ALLEY. - 1. is in Princes Street, Lambeth, near the middle of that street, nearly opposite Anderson's Walk, and leads into Fore Street and to the Thames. - 2. is in Upper Ground Street, Blackfriars' Road, about one sixth of a mile west from Blackfriars' Bridge, and opposite Boddy's Bridge. - 3. is in Kent Street, Southwark.
  • BULLARD'S PLACE, Bethnal Green, is nearly three eighths of a mile eastward of the Salmon and Ball on the Green, or the first street parallel southward to part of Green Street; it extends from Green Place to West Street.
  • BULL BRIDGE, Bermondsey, is the first turning on the left hand in Magdalen Street going from Tooley Street; it leads into Gibbon's Rents and Bermondsey Street.
  • [[BULL COURT. - 1. is in Giltspur Street, the second turning on the right hand from Newgate Street, going towards Smithfield. - 2. is in Fan Street, Goswell Street, and is the continuation of that street on the left. - 3. is in Middlesex Street, formerly Petticoat Lane, three doors northward of Wentworth Street on the same side of the way. - 4. is in the Kingsland Road, the third turning on the left hand from Shoreditch Church. - 5. is in Whitechapel, the first turning westward of Osborn Street, and nearly opposite the church. - 6. is in Nightingale Lane, Limehouse, the first turning on the left hand from Ropemakers' Fields, going towards the New Cut. &#0;???- 7. is in Kent Street, Southwark, a few doors on the right hand from St. George's Church in the Borough. - 8. is in Tooley Street. - [see Tooley's Gateway] - 9. is in Milton Street, formerly Grub Street, Cripplegate.
  • BULLEN COURT, Strand, is nearly opposite the Adelphi, and leads into Maiden Lane, Covent Garden.
  • BULL'S HEAD ALLEY or COURT, Turnmill Street, Clerkenwell, is the second turning on the right hand going from Turnmill Street in Peter Street; or about seven houses on the left hand from Saffron Hill in the opposite direction.
  • [[BULL'S HEAD COURT. - 1. is in Great Peter Street, Westminster, at the west end of that street by the Horse Ferry Road, and nearly opposite Duck Lane. - 2. is in Cow Cross, West Smithfield, the first turning on the right hand from Snow Hill. - 3. is in Newgate Street, the third turning on the right hand from Cheapside, two doors eastward of Butcher's Hall Lane. - 4. is in Lawrence Lane, Cheapside, at the back of No. 97. - 5. is in Newington Causeway, the first turning on the left hand going from the King's Bench towards the Elephant and Castle. - 6. is in Fleet Street, near No. 188. - 7. is at No. 101, Tottenham Court Road. - 8. is in Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields. - 9. is at No. 94, Wood Street, Cheapside.
  • BULL'S HEAD PASSAGE, Wood Street, Cheapside, is opposite Love Lane, and leads into Oat Lane and Noble Street.
  • BULL INN, Holborn, is an old established inn and coach office at No. 121, about a furlong on the right hand side of the street going from Farringdon Street.
  • BULL INN, Bishopsgate, is another old established house at No. 91, about a furlong on the left hand from Cornhill and Gracechurch Street.
  • BULL INN, Aldgate, is another considerable establishment of a similar nature, a few doors on the left hand going from Leadenhall and Fenchurch Streets towards Whitechapel.
  • BULL LANE, Stepney, is opposite the west side of the church, and leads towards Whitechapel.
  • BULL AND MOUTH INN, St. Martin's-le-Grand, is a large newly built establishment opposite the new Post Office, erected in a style of architecture much resembling the domestic style of Sir Christopher Wren's period. It was designed by Mr. Savage, the architect of Chelsea Church, who has contrived a sculptured sign of the Bull and Mouth of humorous proportions. The inn is said to have derived its name from having been the sign of the Boulogne mouth or harbour, and that its present name is a corruption.
  • BULLOCK COURT, Whitecross Street, St. Luke's, is about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from Cripplegate Church, and nearly opposite Playhouse Yard. It leads into Blue Anchor Alley.
  • BULL STAKE COURT, High Street, Whitechapel, is the first turning to the westward of the church.
  • BULL STAIRS, Upper Ground Street, Christ Church, is at the end of Bull Alley, about a furlong westward of the Surrey abutment of Blackfriars' Bridge.
  • BULL WALL, Chelsea, is at No. 18, Paradise Row, about the middle of the south side, and leads to the Thames.
  • BULL WHARF, Queenhithe, Upper Thames Street, is the sout&#0;???h end of Bull Wharf Lane, going from No. 62, Upper Thames Street. Goods are received at this wharf from and despatched to Newcastle, Maidstone, Bristol, Guildford, Bishop's Stortford, Dartford and Kingston, and their several vicinities.
  • BULL WHARF LANE, Upper Thames Street, is at No. 62, by Queenhithe, and about the third of a mile on the left hand going from London Bridge towards Blackfriars.
  • [[BULL YARD. - 1. is in White Horse Street, Ratcliffe, two houses on the left hand from Butcher Row, Ratcliffe Cross, going towards the Commercial Road. - 2. is in Windmill Street, Haymarket, about fourteen houses on the left hand from Piccadilly, and three houses from Queen Street. - 3. is in Fan Street, Goswell Street, [see Bull Court.] - 4. is in Back Hill, Hatton Garden, the first turning on the right from Leather Lane, Holborn. - 5. is in Gray's Inn Lane, six houses southward of Liquorpond Street.
  • BULLY RAG ROW, Bethnal Green, is about a furlong eastward of the green, at the back of the corner formed by Green Street and Globe Street.
  • BULSTRODE MEWS, Mary-le-bone Lane, are eight houses from High Street, and four houses northward of Bulstrode Street.
  • BULSTRODE STREET, Manchester Square, is the fourth turning on the right hand, about a quarter of a mile from Oxford Street, leading to No. 48, Welbeck Street. It derives its name from Bulstrode Park, near Beaconsfield, in Buckinghamshire, formerly a seat of the Duke of Portland, on whose estate this street is built.
  • BUNCHES ALLEY, Thrall Street, Spitalfields, is the first turning on the right hand from Brick Lane, about one fifth of a mile north from Whitechapel Church.
  • BUNHILL COURT, Bunhill Row, turns off at No. 54, eight houses southward of Featherstone Street.
  • BUNHILL FIELDS BURIAL GROUND, City Road, is on the left hand side of the road going from Finsbury Square. \\ldblquote This spacious cemetery,\\rdblquote says Maitland, \\ldblquote was anciently called Bon Hill, or Good Hill,\\rdblquote but I rather suspect Bone Hill, from its very ancient use as a burial ground. In the dreadful pestilence of 1665, it was set apart, walled in at the expense of the City, and consecrated, as a common cemetery for the interment of such dead bodies as could not be buried in the parochial churchyards. Some time after this, Mr. Tindal took a lease of it, and converted it into a burial ground for Dissenters, for which use it has been ever since, and is still appropriated.
  • [[BUNHILL ROW FREE SCHOOL. - [see Haberdashers' School]
  • BUNHILL ROW, St. Luke's, is the first street westward of Finsbury Square and the Artillery Ground; it extends from No. 63, Chiswell Street, to Old Street, opposite St. Luke's Hospital. In this street are the Artillery Ground and the headquarters of the London Militia. - [see Artillery Ground]
  • BURBRIDGE STREET, Lambeth Marsh, is the first turning on the right hand from the Marsh Gate.
  • BURDEN STREET, Berkeley Square, is nearly opposite Mount Street, in Davies Street, and three houses on the right hand from the square; it leads into John Street.
  • BURDETT STREET, Westminster Road, is near the Asylum for Female Orphans.
  • BURFORD COURT, Poplar, is in Burford Terrace, described below. <&#0;???/p>
  • BURFORD TERRACE, Poplar, is at the end of Robin Hood Lane, East India Dock Road.
  • BURKE'S RENTS, Golden Lane, are in Bell Alley, the fifth turning on the left from Barbican.
  • BURLEIGH COURT, Strand, is the second turning on the left in Burleigh Street, at No. 365 in the Strand.
  • BURLEIGH STREET, Strand, is about the middle of the north side of the Strand, and leads to Exeter Street. It was named from its contiguity to the mansion of the great Lord Treasurer Burleigh.
  • BURLINGTON ARCADE, Piccadilly, an arcade lighted by skylights from above, consisting of a double row of handsome shops, with dormitories above them, leading from Piccadilly to Cork Street, Burlington Gardens, by the side of Burlington House. It was designed by Samuel Ware, Esq.
  • BURLINGTON GARDENS, is a street at the back of Burlington House, and extends from No. 24, Old Bond Street to Vigo Lane. It derives its name from being built on the spot which was formerly the garden of Lord Burlington's town house.
  • BURLINGTON HOUSE, Piccadilly, is about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from the Haymarket, opposite Duke Street, St. James's. Lord Clarendon in his history of the rebellion describes this spot, as \\ldblquote a place called Pickadilly, which was a fine house for entertainment and gaming, with handsome gravel walks, with shades, and where were an upper and lower bowling green, whither very many of the nobility and gentry of the best quality resorted, both for exercise and conversation.\\rdblquote This was written in 1640, and the street was completed in 1642, as far as the corner of Berkeley Street. The first good house built in it was Burlington House, the site of which was chosen by its noble founder, \\ldblquote because he was certain no one would build beyond him.\\rdblquote

The mansion is enclosed from the street by a lofty brick wall, which has three entrances to a spacious courtyard, and a noble Doric colonnade that leads to the house. The front is of Portland stone, designed by that celebrated amateur architect the great Earl of Burlington. The apartments are numerous, splendid and in good taste. The hall and staircase are painted by Sebastian Ricci.

  • BURLINGTON MEWS, NEW]], Regent Street, are about the fifth of a mile on the left hand, at No. 151, Regent Street, going from No. 44, Piccadilly.
  • [[BURLINGTON PLACE. - 1. is at No. 97, Broad Street, Ratcliffe, opposite Stone Stairs. - 2. is in the Old Kent Road, nearly opposite Albany Road.
  • BURLINGTON STREET, NEW]], Regent Street, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand going from Piccadilly; it leads into Saville Row.
  • BURLINGTON STREET, OLD]], is the second turning on the right hand in Vigo Lane, going from Regent Street, and extends to Boyle Street.
  • BURMAN'S ROW, Green Street, Bethnal Green, is part of the south side of the green, and nearly opposite Chester Place.
  • BURNE'S PLACE, Lisson Green, is at No. 25, Chapel Street, Lisson Green.
  • [[BUR&#0;???OSS STREET]], Commercial Road, is near Cannon Street, St. George's in the East.
  • BURR STREET, Lower East Smithfield, is near a quarter of a mile eastward of the Tower, and extends from the eastern boundary wall of St. Katherine Docks to Nightingale Lane, and is about a furlong in length.
  • BURROW'S BUILDINGS, Blackfriars' Road, forms part of the west side of the road, nearly opposite Surrey Chapel, and extends from Charlotte Street to George's Row.
  • BURROW'S MEWS, is at the back or west side of Burrow's Buildings aforesaid.
  • BURTON CRESCENT, Russell Square, is a spacious handsome crescent, erected by James Burton, Esq., whose name it bears, on ground belonging to the Skinner's Company. It commences at the north end of Marchmont Street, Great Coram Street, Brunswick Square, and extends by Leigh Street, Burton Street and Speldhurst Street, to Mabledon Place, which continues its chord or straight side into the New Road.
  • BURTON RENTS, Shoreditch, are in Holywell Street, near Norton Falgate.
  • BURTON STREET, Tavistock Square, is situated behind the east side of the square, and derives its name from the same circumstances as Burton Crescent, which see.
  • BURY COURT, St. Mary Axe, is the fourth turning on the right hand from Leadenhall Street.
  • [[BURY PLACE. - 1. is in Bloomsbury, and is the continuation of Lyon Street from High Holborn; it extends from No. 30, Hart Street, to No. 66, Great Russell Street. - 2. is in St. Mary Axe, at No. 19.
  • BURY STREET, St. James's, is the first turning eastward, and parallel to St. James's Street, and extends from No. 81, Jermyn Street, to King Street.
  • BURY STREET, St. Mary Axe, is parallel to St. Mary Axe; entering by a small Court at No. 10, it leads to Bevis Marks.
  • BURYING GROUND ALLEY, Bunhill Row, is in Chequer Alley, about the middle of the north side entering from No. 99, Bunhill Row, or at No. 107, Whitecross Street.
  • BURYING GROUND PASSAGE, Paradise Street, Mary-le-bone, is at the west end of that street and leads into Paddington Street.
  • BUSBY COURT, Bethnal Green, is the second turning on the left in James Street, going from No. 124, Church Street; it leads into Oakley Street, Thomas Street and Brick Lane.
  • BUSH COURT, Southwark, is at No. 19, Stoney Street.
  • BUSH LANE, Cannon Street, is opposite St. Swithin's Lane and leads into Upper Thames Street, about the fifth of a mile on the right hand from London Bri&#0;???dge.
  • BUSH LANE, LITTLE]], is at No. 23, Bush Lane, Cannon Street, and leads into Upper Thames Street.
  • BUSHEL'S COURT, Southwark, is opposite No. 9, Stoney Street and is the first turning on the right from the Clink, towards the Borough Market.
  • BUSHEL'S RENTS, Wapping, are the second turning on the left below the Hermitage Bridge, and lead into Great Hermitage Street.
  • BUTCHERS' HALL, Pudding Lane, is four doors on the left hand from No. 5, Eastcheap. It has been lately rebuilt after having been destroyed by fire in 1829. The company of butchers appears to be of great antiquity, for in the 26th of Henry II., A.D. 1180, it was fined for setting up a guild without the King's licence. They were not incorporated till the 3rd of James I. who on the 16th September, 1605, granted them a charter by letters patent, under the name of \\ldblquote The Master, Wardens and Commonalty of the Art or Mystery of Butchers of the City of London.\\rdblquote It is a livery company and stands the twenty-fourth on the city list.
  • BUTCHER HALL LANE, Newgate Street, is a few doors on the right from Cheapside, and leads to Little Britain and Smithfield.
  • [[BUTCHER ROW. - 1. is near Ratcliffe Cross, and extends from the east end of Broad Street, at No. 61, to Brook Street and White Horse Street. - 2. is at No. 80, Upper East Smithfield. - 3. is in St. George's Market, St. George's Fields, at the north west side of the market, and leads towards the London Road.
  • BUTLER'S ALMS HOUSES, Chapel Street, Westminster, were founded in 1673, by Mr. Nicholas Butler, who built and endowed them for two poor men and their wives.
  • BUTLER'S ALLEY, Finsbury, is at the north end of Moor Lane, on the left hand from No. 87, Fore Street; it leads into Ropemaker's Street, Finsbury Square.
  • [[BUTLER'S BUILDINGS. - 1. is in George Street, Spitalfields, the first turning on the right hand northward of Spicer Street, and near No. 82, Brick Lane. - 2. is in Upper East Smithfield, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from Tower Hill, and leads into Cartwright Square and Rosemary Lane. - 3. is in Artillery Lane, Southwark, about the middle of the south side, and the second turning on the right hand down Crucifix Lane going from Bermondsey Street.
  • BUTLERS COURT, Houndsditch, is about half way down on the right hand side.
  • BUTLER'S WHARF, Shad Thames, Horselydown, is opposite Thomas Street, about half a mile below London Bridge.
  • BUTTON ALLEY, Finsbury, is in Ropemaker's Street, Finsbury Place.
  • BUTTON COURT, Bishopsgate, is the first turning on the left hand in Acorn Alley, going from Bishopsgate Without.
  • BUTTON'S ENTRY, Stepney, is at the north end of White Horse Street, and nearly opposite the workhouse.
  • BUXTON PLACE, Lambeth, is nearly half a mile on the right hand side of the road going from Westminster Bridge, opposite the terrace, and near to the Three Stags, by New Bethlem; it leads from Lambeth New Chapel towards the church.
  • BYCE COURT, Blue Anchor Yard, Rosemary Lane, is the thi&#0;???rd turning on the right hand in going from Rosemary Lane towards Upper East Smithfield.
  • BYDE STREET, Bethnal Green, is the north side of Anchor Street, and extends from Swan Yard to Club Row.
  • BYFIELD PLACE, Charlotte Street, Blackfriars' Road, is a few houses on the right hand between Surrey Chapel and Gravel Lane, by the north east corner of Nelson Square.
  • BYNG'S BUILDINGS, Hoxton, are in Hoxton Town, a short distance from Old Street Road.

C

  • CABBAGE ALLEY, Bermondsey, is near the middle of the north side of Long Lane, a few houses westward of the King's Head.
  • CABINET COURT, Spitalfields, is a turning in Duke Street, towards Bethnal Green.
  • CABLE COURT, Rosemary Lane, turns off at No. 42, Cable Street.
  • CABLE PLACE, Cable Street, Wellclose Square, is opposite Short Street, and at the back of the houses, from Nos. 40 to 55.
  • CABLE STREET, Wellclose Square, is the east continuation of Rosemary Lane, Tower Hill, and extends from White Lion Street to the New Road, St. George's in the East.
  • CABLE STREET, Edgware Road, turns off at No. 7, John Street West, by No. 78, Edgware Road.
  • CADDICK'S ROW, Whitehall, is about thirty houses on the left, going from Charing Cross towards Westminster Bridge; it is opposite the Admiralty, and leads into Great Scotland Yard.
  • CADOGAN MEWS, Sloane Street, Chelsea, are the first turning on the left going from Knightsbridge.
  • CADOGAN PLACE, Sloane Street, Chelsea, is opposite No. 76, and the Cadogan Arms, about one third of a mile on the left from Knightsbridge.
  • CADOGAN PLACE, UPPER]], Sloane Street, Chelsea, is opposite No. 50, about one quarter of a mile on the left from Knightsbridge.
  • CADOGAN PLACE, LOWER]], is at the south end of Cadogan Square, opposite No. 119, Sloane Street.
  • CADOGAN PLACE, LITTLE]], is behind the east side of the above named square.
  • CADOGAN SQUARE, is the large planted opening on the east side of Sloane Street.
  • CADOGAN STREET, UPPER]], is also in Sloane Street, near the preceding.
  • CADOGAN STREET, Brompton, is in Marlborough Road, leading from the King's Road, Chelsea, towards Brompton.
  • CAIN'S ALLEY, Southwark is at Bankside, between the Surrey ends of Blackfriars and Southwark Bridges.
  • CAIN'S COURT, Church Lane, Whitechapel, it about the middle of the east side of Cain's Place.
  • CAIN'S PLACE, Church Lane, Whitechapel, is the first turning on the right hand, about six houses from No. 65, Cable Street, Wellclose Square.
  • CALEDONIAN ASYLUM, THE]], Copenhagen Fields, Islington. The Corporation of the Caledonian Asylum for supporting and educating the Children of Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, natives of Scotland, and of indigent Scotch parents resident in London, and not entitled to parochial relief,&#0;??? was instituted and incorporated in 1815. This charitable institution derives its origin from a resolution passed in 1808, at a meeting of the Highland Society of London, and has received great patronage from the British public in all parts of its vast empire.

In 1816, the directors purchased the freehold premises in Cross Street, Hatton Garden, which had belonged to the Gaelic chapel, but have since removed to a spacious, handsome and commodious building, erected by themselves in Copenhagen Fields, Islington.

The society is governed by the King, as Patron; H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex, President; the Dukes of Gordon, Athol, Montrose and Wellington, Viscount Melville, Lord Lynedoch, Sir Charles Forbes, Bart and Lord Saltoun, Vice Presidents; Viscount Glenorchy, Lords Strathaven and P. J. Stuart, Alexander Grant, Esq. and twenty-two other distinguished and active gentlemen, Directors; Alexander Glennie, Thomas Hutchon, and James Gordon Duff, Esqs., Treasurers; Donald Makinnon, M.D., Physician; Charles Bell, Esq., F.R.S., Surgeon; the Rev. John Lees, A.M., Superintendent and Secretary; and Mr. John Ross, Collector.

  • CALEDONIAN SOCIETY, THE]], for affording relief to Distressed and Destitute Persons of all countries and descriptions, was established in 1820, and hold their meetings at No. 25, Old Burlington Street. John Gay, Esq., is Treasurer,
  • CALENDAR YARD, Long Alley, Moorfields, is the sixth turning on the left hand going from Moorfields towards Sun Street, and nearly opposite Ball Alley.
  • [[CALICO Buildings, Printers Place, Bermondsey, is on the east side of the Neckinger Road, facing Prospect Row and Parker's Row, and is about a quarter of a mile from Hickman's Folly, Dock Head.
  • CALMEL BUILDINGS, Portman Square, is the second turning on the right in Orchard Street, Portman Square, leading into Edward's Mews and Duke Street.
  • [[CALTHORPE PLACE. - 1. is in Paradise Row, Chelsea, opposite No. 12, and is the first turning on the left hand, a few yards from the Royal Hospital going towards Battersea Bridge. - 2. is in Gray's Inn Road, near Calthorpe Street, and receives its name from Lord Calthorpe, on whose estate it has been built by the Messrs. Cubitts.
  • CALTHORPE STREET, Gray's Inn Road, is a new handsome street, on the same estate as the last. It turns off at No. 43, Upper North Place, Gray's Inn Road, nearly opposite to Guilford Street.
  • CALVERT STREET, Old Gravel Lane, is about a quarter of a mile on the right hand side going from Ratcliffe Highway, and nearly opposite No. 28; it leads into Tench Street and the London Docks.
  • CAMBERWELL FREE GRAMMAR SCHOOL, was founded and endowed by the Rev. Edward Wilson, Vicar of Camberwell, in the reign of James I., who granted him letters patent, dated 29th of September, in the 13th year of his reign. The rectors of Lambeth, Newington Butts and St. Olave, Southwark, the Vicar of Carshalton, the vicar and churchwardens of Camberwell, the patron of the vicarage, (then Sir Edmund Bowyer, who gave his name to the lane so called) with other persons, were appointed governors. The above named persons, and their successors, have the nomination of the masters, and appoint new governors as vacancies occur. The number of boys is limited to twelve. The present official governors, are the Rev. G. D'Oyly, D.D., Rector of Lambeth; the Rev. Arthur Onslow, Rector of Newington Butts; the Rev. A. H. Kenn&#0;???y, D.D., Rector of St. Olaves; the Rev. W. Rose, Vicar of Carshalton; the Rev. J. G. Storie, Vicar of Camberwell; Sir Thomas Smythe, Bart., Patron of the Vicarage.
  • CAMBRIDGE HEATH, Hackney Road, is about a mile and an eighth from Shoreditch Church, by the turnpike towards Hackney.
  • [[CAMBRIDGE ROAD. - [see Dog Row]
  • [[CAMBRIDGE PLACE. - 1. is in Cleveland Street, Fitzroy Square, on the west side of the square, between Carburton Street and Buckingham Street. - 2. is at Cambridge Heath, Hackney Road, a few doors on the left hand from the turnpike towards Hackney. - 3. is also in the Hackney Road, and extends from Great Cambridge Street towards the Nag's Head.
  • CAMBRIDGE STREET, GREAT]], Hackney Road, is about half a mile on the left hand side of the road going from Shoreditch church; it leads towards Dalston.
  • CAMBRIDGE STREET, LITTLE]], Hackney Road, is about eight doors on the left in Great Cambridge Street, going from the Hackney Road.
  • CAMBRIDGE STREET, Golden Square, is the north continuation of Windmill Street, Haymarket, and leads into Broad Street, Poland Street, and to No. 365, Oxford Street.
  • CAMBRIDGE TERRACE, Regent's Park, is a handsome row of houses on the east side of the Regent's Park, between the Colosseum and Chester Terrace. It is named after his Majesty's royal brother, the Duke of Cambridge. The centre, and the two wings are ornamented with porticoes of the Roman Doric order, with rusticated columns. The plantations on the side next the Colosseum add materially to the effect of the architecture, which was designed by Mr. Nash.
  • CAMBRIDGE TERRACE, Islington, is in the Lower Road, and leads from Islington Green to Ball's Pond Turnpike.
  • CAMDEN COURT, Cripplegate, is at the north end of Grub Street, three houses on the left hand going from Chiswell Street.
  • CAMDEN PLACE, Kentish Town, is on the right hand side of the road leading to Highgate, nearly opposite the Windsor Castle Tavern and Tea Gardens.
  • CAMDEN ROW AND PLACE, Bethnal Green New Road, forms part of the south side, and is about three quarters of a mile on the right hand from Shoreditch by Willmott Street, near the green.
  • CAMDEN STREET, Pancras, is a street of large houses, and leads from the High Road, near the new workhouse.
  • CAMDEN STREET, East Lane, Walworth, is the second turning on the left hand about a furlong from High Street, and extends to Lock's Fields.
  • CAMDEN STREET, Islington, is in the Lower Road, and leads from Islington Green to Ball's Pond Turnpike.
  • CAMEL BUILDINGS, Orchard Street, Portman Square. - [see Calmel's Buildings]
  • CAMERA STREET, Chelsea, is at the corner of Park Terrace, King's Road.
  • CAMM'S BUILDINGS, Stepney, are in Catherine Street, Commercial Road, the third turning on the right fr&#0;???om Cannon Street Road.
  • CAMOMILE MEWS, Bishopsgate, are at No. 15, in Camomile Street, and at fifteen houses on the right hand from Bishopsgate Street.
  • CAMOMILE STREET, Bishopsgate, is the first turning on the right hand, nearly a quarter of a mile northward of Cornhill, and opposite Wormwood Street, a few doors south from Houndsditch, and leads into St. Mary Axe, nearly opposite Bevis Marks.
  • CAMP'S ALMS HOUSES, Wormwood Street, were founded by Mr. Lawrence Camp, for the relief of six poor people of the parish of Allhallows, London Wall.
  • CAMPERDOWN PLACE, Snow's Fields, is the sixth turning on the left hand from No. 238, Bermondsey Street.
  • CAMPION LANE, Upper Thames Street, is about the sixth of a mile on the left, hand from London Bridge, by the side of Allhallows Church, opposite Suffolk Lane.
  • CANADA COMPANY'S OFFICE, No. 13, St. Helen's Place, Bishopsgate, This trading company was established in 1826, in aid of our Anglo American Colonies of Canada. It is conducted under the management of Charles Bosanquet, Esq., Governor; Edmund Ellice, Esq., Deputy Governor; John Easthope, Esq., M.P., Robert Biddulph, Esq., and ten other Directors; Nicholas S. Price, Esq., Secretary, and Mr. John Perry, Chief Clerk.
  • CANADA COURT, Finsbury, is in Little Cheapside, Long Alley, Moorfields.
  • [[CANAL PLACE. - 1. is in Mile End, near the Regent's Canal Bridge in the Mile End Road. - 2. is near the Surrey Canal in the Old Kent Road.
  • CANAL ROW, Bermondsey, is a few houses below East Lane Stairs, Bermondsey Wall.
  • CANADINES BUILDINGS, Westminster, turns off at No. 11, Gray Coat Place, opposite the Gray Coat School, Westminster, by Strutton Ground.
  • CANDLEWICK WARD, is bounded on the east by Bridge Ward, on the south by Bridge and Dowgate Wards, on the west by Dowgate and Walbrook Wards, and on the north by Langbourn Ward. Its principal streets are Great Eastcheap, the west end of Cannon Street and St. Martin's Lane, and its most remarkable buildings are the parish churches of St. Clements, Eastcheap, St. Mary, Abchurch, and St. Michael's, Crooked Lane. - [see these several streets and churches]

This ward derives its name from the street, now called Cannon Street, which was formerly called Candlewick or Candlewright Street, and was the residence of the principal wax and tallow chandlers, then called Candlewrights. It is divided into seven precincts, and is governed by an alderman, (Samuel Birch, Esq.) a deputy and seven other common councilmen, and other ward officers.

  • CANE PLACE, Southwark, is at the south end of Gravel Lane, and near the east end of Bennett's Row, Blackfriars' Road.
  • CANNON or CANON ALLEY, St. Paul's Churchyard, is the north side of the churchyard, a few houses from Cheapside, and leads into Paternoster Row. It receives its name from having been in ancient times the residence of the canons of St. Paul's Cathedral.
  • CANNON PLACE, Mile End, is the first turning on the left hand going from the turnpike towards London; it leads into Mile End Grove.
  • CANNON or CANON ROW, Westminster, extends from behind No. 49, Parliament Street to No. 9, Bridge Street. It derives its name as formerly consisting of the houses for the canons of St. Stephen's, Westminster, and was formerly called St. Stephen's, or Canon Row.
  • CANNON STREET, Walbrook, is a considerable street extending from Dowgate Hill, Budge Row and Walbrook into Eastcheap.
  • CANNON STREET, St. George's in the East, is at No. 143, Ratcliffe Highway, near the church, and extends to the Commercial Road; it is continued by Cannon Street Road to Whitechapel, a distance of about half a mile.
  • CANNON STREET, Southwark, is in the Mint, and is the continuation of Lamb Street from Blackman Street, into George Street and Great Suffolk Street.
  • [[CANON ALLEY. - [see Cannon Alley]
  • [[CANON ROW. - [see Cannon Row]
  • CANTERBURY BUILDINGS, Lambeth, are the continuation of Hercules Buildings, near Lambeth Terrace, going from the Asylum for Female Orphans towards Lambeth Church.
  • [[CANTERBURY COURT. - 1. is on St. Andrew's Hill, Blackfriars. - 2. is at No. 53, Phoenix Street, Spitalfields.
  • CANTERBURY PLACE, Lambeth, forms part of the south side of the road leading from the Three Stags to Lambeth Church, commencing near the new chapel.
  • CANTERBURY PLACE, LITTLE]], Lambeth, is on the south side or back of the last described, and is the first turning on the right hand in Lambeth Walk. Besides these there are other places of the same name. - 1. is in Walworth, which extends from the west end of Manor Row or Place to Hartford Place. - 2. is in Eaton Street, Newington Butts. - 3. is near the Surrey Canal, Old Kent Road.
  • CANTERBURY ROW, Newington, forms part of the east side of the Kennington Road, and leads from Newington Church to Kennington Common, commencing about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from the said church.
  • CANTERBURY SQUARE, Southwark, is in Dean Street, beginning at two houses on the right hand from Tooley Street, about a quarter of a mile from London Bridge.
  • CANTERBURY WALK, Lambeth, is in Canterbury Buildings, behind No. 15, Lambeth Terrace by South Street; it leads to Canterbury Buildings.
  • CANTON PLACE, Poplar or Limehouse, forms part of the north side of the East India Dock Road, opposite Pennyfields, Poplar, and is nearly a quarter of a mile on the left hand eastward from Limehouse Church going towards Blackwall.
  • CAPEL COURT, Bartholomew Lane, is the first turning on the right hand from the Royal Exchange, and is facing the east entrance of the Bank. It derives its name from being on the site of the mansion of Sir William Capel, who was Lord Mayor in 1603. It was erected in 1801 from the designs of James Peacock, Esq., and has been since considerably enlarged by the addition of a Foreign Stock Exchange. It has four entrances, one from Capel Court, one from Shorter's Court, and one from New Court, both in Throgmorton Street, and one from Hercules Court, Old Broad Street.
  • CAPTAIN'S WALK, Lambeth, is in Vine Street, the second turning on the right from Narrow Wall.
  • [[C&#0;???ARBURTON STREET]], Fitzroy Square, is the second turning on the right hand in Cleveland Street, going from the New Road, and nearly opposite to Grafton Street, Tottenham Court Road; it extends to Portland Road.
  • [[CARDIGAN PLACE. - 1. is in Upper Kennington Lane, it forms part of the north side of the way by Kennington Cross, on the right hand going towards Vauxhall. - 2. is in Hoxton.
  • CARDIGAN STREET, turns off at No. 4, Cardigan Place, Kennington, before mentioned.
  • CARD'S YARD, Bermondsey, turns off at No. 35, Bermondsey Street.
  • CAREY LANE, Cheapside, is the first turning on the right in Gutter Lane, going from Maiden Lane, Wood Street, and leads into Foster Lane, opposite the new Post Office.
  • CAREY PLACE, Lambeth, is in Oakley Street, Westminster Bridge Road, by the Oakley Arms; it leads into Carey Street and towards Lambeth Marsh.
  • CAREY STREET, Lambeth Marsh, is the first turning on the north, and parallel to Oakley Street; its entrance is by Green Row, nearly opposite James Street.
  • CAREY STREET, Westminster, is in Vincent Street, Vauxhall Bridge Road.
  • CAREY STREET, Lincoln's Inn Fields, is the first turning on the left hand in Chancery Lane going from Fleet Street, and leads into Portugal Street and Clare Market.
  • CARLISLE CHAPEL, Kennington Lane, is an episcopal chapel of ease to St. Mary, Lambeth, and is situated between Pleasant Row and Mansion House Row, on the east side of Kennington Lane, about a furlong on the left hand going from the Plough and Harrow.
  • CARLISLE LANE, Lambeth, is in Mount Street, Westminster Bridge Road, two or three houses southward of the Marsh Gate, on the right hand leading to Carlisle Place.
  • CARLISLE PLACE, Carlisle Lane, Lambeth, is the continuation of the last towards Lambeth Church.
  • CARLISLE SQUARE, Lambeth, is the first turning on the right in Carlisle Lane, a few yards beyond the Marsh Gate.
  • CARLISLE STREET, Soho Square, is a short street, at No. 34, on the west side, intersecting Dean Street at No. 67, and leading into Little Chapel Street and Wardour Street.
  • CARLISLE STREET, Edgware Road, it at No. 42, Earl Street, West Portman Place, on the right hand side of the Edgware Road.
  • CARLTON CHAMBERS, Regent Street, is a large handsome building, at Nos. 4, 8 and 12, on the east side, fitted up as sets of chambers for gentlemen and professional men.
  • CARLTON PLACE, Kennington is the first turning on the left hand in White Hart Row going from Kennington Lane, or the third turning on the right from Clayton Place, Clapham Road, Newington.
  • CARNABY MARKET, Golden Square, the west end of Broad Street, on the right from Berwick Street, Oxford Street, having Marlborough Street on the north, and Broad Street on the south west. It was formerly called Marlborough Market, after the great Duke of that name. It is erected on the site of the western portion of a piece of waste ground, anciently &#0;???called the Pest Field, from a lazaretto that was erected there in 1665, for the reception of persons seized with the plague. Some thousands who died in that calamitous year were interred in the cemetery, which was in a distant part of the ground.
  • CARNABY STREET, Carnaby Market, is on the west side of the above described market, and extends from No. 28, Great Marlborough Street to No. 22, Silver Street, Golden Square.
  • CAROL'S COURT, Charles Street, Horselydown, is at the back of No. 18, the corner of New Street, Dock Head.
  • CAROLINA WHARF, Rotherhithe, is in Rotherhithe Street, nearly opposite Clarence Street.
  • CAROLINE COTTAGES, Kennington, are in the Oval, between Kennington Common and Vauxhall Gardens.
  • CAROLINE COURT, Great Saffron Hill, is opposite Charles Street, Hatton Garden, or the third turning on the right hand going from Holborn Hill along Field Lane.
  • CAROLINE MEWS, Bedford Square, are about the middle of the east side of Caroline Street, and nearly opposite Tavistock Street, Tottenham Court Road; they lead into Charlotte Street.
  • [[CAROLINE PLACE. - 1. is in Mecklenburgh Square, opposite No. 16, and the second turning on the right hand from Gray's Inn Lane, on the east side of the Foundling Hospital. - 2. is opposite to No. 131, John Street Road. - 3. is by No. 162, Kingsland Road. - 4. is in the City Road, opposite Fountain Place, and forms part of the north side, about a furlong on the right hand from Old Street going towards Islington; it extends from Plumber Street to City Terrace. - 5. is by No. 1, Portman Place, Edgware Road. - 6. is at No. 102, Goswell Street. - 7. is at No. 7, Bakers Row, Clerkenwell. - 8. is at No. 17, Castle Street, York Street, Westminster. - 9. is in Queen Street, Chelsea. - 10. is in Marlborough Road, Brompton. - 11. is in Trevor Square, Knightsbridge. - 12. is at No. 6, Marston Street, Somers Town. - 13. is at No. 34, Elliott's Row, Prospect Place, St. George's Fields. - 14. is in Henry Street, Stepney. - 15. is at No. 13, Gibraltar Row, Hackney Road. - 16. is opposite Church Street, Camberwell.
  • CAROLINE STREET, Bedford Square, extends from the south west corner of the square into Great Russell Street, ten houses on the left going from Tottenham Court Road.
  • CAROLINE STREET, Hackney Road, is by No. 5, Norway Place, about a third of a mile on the right hand going from Shoreditch Church.
  • CAROLINE STREET, Lambeth, is by No. 41, Elizabeth Place, a few houses on the right from Kennington Cross.
  • CAROLINE STREET, Ratcliffe, turns off at No. 20, Brook Street, Sun Tavern Fields.
  • CARON'S ALMS HOUSES, Vauxhall, are situated in Kingston Road near Vauxhall Turnpike, and were founded in 1622, by Noel, Baron of Caron, who was then ambassador from the States General. They consist of seven detached rooms for as many poor women of the parish of Lambeth, with an allowance of \\'a34. a year each, to be paid out of adequate estates which are left charged for this purpose. In 1678, in consequence of some dispute, the Court of Chancery established it in perpetuity. Over the entrance gate is a Latin inscription, signifying that they were founded by the Baron Noel de Caron, in the year 1622, the thirty second year of his embassy.
  • CARPENTERS BUILDINGS, London Wall, is opposite the south east corner&#0;??? of Broker Row, about three houses westward of Winchester Street.
  • CARPENTERS' HALL, Carpenters' Buildings, London Wall, is situated in the last mentioned buildings. It is an ancient building, having escaped the fire of London and is at present used as a carpet warehouse.

The Carpenter's Company is a very ancient fraternity, having been incorporated by letters patent of Edward III., in the year 1344, by the name of \\ldblquote The Master, Wardens, Assistants and Commonalty, of the Mystery of the Freemen of the Carpenters of the City of London,\\rdblquote with a power to make bye-laws for their better regulation.

This company are trustees to the following excellent charities, namely, that of Thomas Gittins, who bequeathed, in July 1587, certain messuages in London Wall for the aid of three poor freemen of the company; that of Richard Wyatt, who bequeathed, in March 1618, certain property at Henley upon Thames, then let at \\'a37. and now at \\'a320. a year, to be divided among thirteen poor widows; that of John Day, who by will dated February 27, 1629, gave a messuage in Bishopsgate Without, now occupied by Mr. Benjamin Godfrey Windus, to be divided among ten poor widows; that of John Read, who in March 1651, gave certain messuages and Other property in Bermondsey and other parts of Southwark, for ten poor freemen and widows; that of William Pope, who by will dated about 1678, charged certain premises in Coleman Street, with the yearly payment of \\'a33. 10s., to be distributed to seven poor members of the company or their widows; those of Samuel Burgin, who in 1736, being then master of the company, gave \\'a3100., and Colonel John Williams, being then middle warden, gave \\'a360., both for the use of the poor freemen and widows of the company; that of William Reynolds, who by his will dated the 9th August, 1768, gave \\'a3300. 3 per cent. South Sea Annuities, the dividends of which were to be distributed among nine poor freemen of the company; that of Edward Fenner, who left a messuage in St. Helen's for similar purposes; three messuages in the Almonry, Westminster, by an unknown donor; that of William Higgins, of Air Street, carpenter, who in 1801 gave \\'a3100. Navy 5 per cents, towards the support of the poor of the company; and others, the particulars and mode of distribution of which, are to be found in the reports of the Parliamentary Commissioners on the Endowed Charities of the City of London.

  • CARPENTERS' STREET, Vine Street, Westminster, is the third turning on the left hand, from No. 43, Milbank Street, leading to the Horse Ferry Road.
  • CARPENTER STREET, Mount Street, Berkeley Square, is six houses from Davies Street, at the north west corner of the square, and leads into Mount Row.
  • [[CARPENTER'S YARD. - 1. is in Half Moon Street, Bishopsgate, at the back of the Half Moon, a few yards on the right from Bishopsgate Without. - 2. is in Coleman Street, Old Jewry. - 3. is in Long Lane, West Smithfield. - 4. is in St. Dunstan's Alley, six houses from St. Dunstan's Hill.
  • CARR SQUARE, Cripplegate, is the third turning on the left hand in Moor Lane, about twelve houses from Fore Street.
  • CARR YARD, Rosemary Lane, is the fourth turning on the right hand in Blue Anchor Yard, going from Rosemary Lane towards Upper East Smithfield.
  • CARRIER STREET, Church Street, St. Giles's, is a street parallel, westward, to Dyot Street, and extends from Church Lane to Buckeridge Street.
  • CARRINGTON MEWS, May Fair, is the second turning on the right hand in Chapel Street, going from No. 35, Curzon Street.
  • CARRINGTON PLACE, May Fair, is the continuation of Down Street, Piccadilly. It leads into Hertford Street, at No. 17.
  • CARRINGTON STREET, May Fair, is on the south side of Shepherd's Market, about six houses on the left hand from White Horse Street, Piccadilly.
  • CARROL PLACE, Lambeth, is a turning at No. 13, Church Street, facing the Stags, in Westminster Bridge Road, and leading down to the church.
  • CARRON WHARF, Upper Thames Street, is opposite No. 224, about one fifth of a mile east from Blackfriars' Bridge.
  • CARRON WHARF, Lower East Smithfield, receives and delivers goods to and from Bridport, Axminster, Sherborne, Glasgow, Paisley, Greenock, Harwich, Halifax, Manchester, Leeds, Louth and their respective vicinities.
  • CARRON WHARF, Upper Thames Street, near Queenhithe, where all the various descriptions of cast iron work, manufactured at the Carron Works, in Scotland, may be obtained.
  • CARTER COURT, Redcross Street, Southwark is the first turning on the left hand from Park Street, Borough Market.
  • CARTER COURT, Houndsditch, is the first turning on the right hand in Cutler Street, a few doors from Houndsditch.
  • CARTER LANE, GREAT]], Doctors' Commons, is the first turning on the left in Creed Lane, Ludgate Street. It extends to Paul's Chain, St. Paul's Churchyard.
  • CARTER LANE, LITTLE]], Doctors' Commons, is the continuation, eastward, of the last, and extends from Paul's Chain to No. 13, Old Change.
  • CARTER LANE, Tooley Street, is the second turning on the right hand going from London Bridge.
  • CARTER STREET, Bethnal Green, is in Brick Lane, about three furlongs from Whitechapel. It extends into Spital Square.
  • CARTERET STREET, Westminster, is in the Broadway, at the west end of Tothill Street. It leads into Park Street.
  • CARTERET YARD, Westminster, is in the middle of the west side of the above street.
  • CARTHUSIAN STREET, Aldersgate Street, is about eight or nine houses northward on the left hand from Barbican, and leads into Charter House Square.
  • CARTWRIGHT'S BUILDINGS, Bermondsey, are in the Grange Road, the fifth turning on the right hand from Bermondsey New Road towards Rotherhithe.
  • CARTWRIGHT SQUARE, Rosemary Lane, is the south end of Cartwright Street, and leads into the middle of Upper East Smithfield.
  • CARTWRIGHT STREET, Rosemary Lane, is nearly a quarter of a mile on the right hand from the Minories. It leads to Cartwright Square and Upper East Smithfield.
  • CASTLE ALLEY, Royal Exchange, is on the west side, and leading from Cornhill to the Bank of England.
  • CASTLE BAYNARD COPPER COMPANY, Upper Thames Street, is at No. 12, between Anderson's and the Carron Company's Wharfe, about the sixth of a mile eastward of Blackfriars' Bridge.
  • CASTLE BAYNARD WARD, derives its name from a once celebrated castle, built on the north bank of the Thames, by Baynard, a brave and noble soldier, who came over with William the Norman, who bestowed upon him many mark&#0;???s of his favour. Among these he gave him the barony of Little Dunmow, which being forfeited to the Crown in 1111, by the traitorous practices of William Baynard, his successor, was given, together with the honours of Baynard Castle, by Henry I., to Gilbert, Earl of Clare, and his successors. From this nobleman, it descended in the female line, to Robert Fitzwalter, Castellan and Banner bearer of London, in 1213. King John, making criminal overtures to the Castellan's daughter, aroused him and his brother barons, who made war upon the King, but being defeated, Fitzwalter and his more immediate associates were banished, Baynard's Castle, and two other dwellings belonging to him were demolished, and his daughter, Matilda the Fair, for rejecting the tyrant's unlawful suit, was poisoned. John afterwards invaded France in 1214, with a powerful army, when a truce was made between the kings of England and France for five years. There being a river or arm of the sea between the rival armies, an English knight called to those on the French side, and challenged any one to come over and take a joust or two with him. Robert Fitzwalter, who was with the French army, ferried over, and mounting his steed, accepted the challenge. At the first course he struck his adversary so violently with his long spear, that both man and Horse fell to the ground. Fitzwalter's spear having been broke by the concussion, he returned to the French King John exclaimed, \\ldblquote By God's tooth,\\rdblquote his usual oath, \\ldblquote he were a King indeed who had such a knight;\\rdblquote and on being informed it was his injured subject, Fitzwalter, he concluded a peace with France, restored the Castellan to his honours and estates, and gave him permission to rebuild his castle of Baynard.

This brave baron died in 1234, and was buried in Dunmow. He was succeeded by his son Walter, who dying and leaving his son under age, it fell under the wardship of King Henry, who reclaimed them formally in 1303, before John Blount, then Mayor of London.

The ancient castle was destroyed by fire in 1428, and was rebuilt by Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester. At his death, Henry VI. gave it to Richard, Duke of York, who resided here with his armed followers, to the number of four hundred men, during the important convention of the great men of the nation in 1458, the forerunner of the civil war between the Houses of York and Lancaster.

  • [[Baynard Castle was also the residence of Richard III. when he assumed the title of King; it was afterwards beautified and made more commodious by Henry VII., who frequently resided within its walls, and the Privy council met here, on the 19th of July, 1653, for the purpose of proclaiming Queen Mary, at which time it was the property and the residence of William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke.

No trace now remains of this ancient and once magnificent edifice, the scene of 80 many strange and eventful transactions. A similar fate has attended most of the splendid castles and baronial residences that once crowded this interesting part of the city; such as the castle of Mounfichet, and another castle built by Edward II., which being afterwards appropriated for the reception and residence of the Papal legates, was called Legate's Inn; and also Beaumont's Inn, afterwards Huntingdon House, a very noble mansion built in the 30th year of Edward IV., in Thames Street, opposite St. Peter's Hill; the city mansion of the family of Scroop, on the west side of Paul's Wharf; Berkeley's Inn or Palace, in Addle Street; the stately palace belonging to the priors of Okeburn, in Wiltshire, which stood in Castle Lane, and many others of inferior note in this neighbourhood.

  • [[Castle Baynard Ward is bounded on the west and north by the ward of Farringdon Within; on the east, by that of Queenhithe; and on the south, by the river Thames. Its principal streets a&#0;???re the western end of Upper Thames Street, St. Peters Hill, St. Bennett's Hill, Addle Hill, Knight Rider Street, Paul's Chain, part of St. Paul's Churchyard and Ludgate Street, and the east sides of Creed Lane, Ave Maria Lane, and Warwick Lane, with a part of the western end of Paternoster Row. Its most remarkable public buildings are, the parish churches of St. Bennett's, Paul's Wharf; St. Andrew's, Wardrobe; and St. Mary Magdalen, and the Colleges of Heralds and Doctors' Commons. - [see those several places and buildings]

It is divided into twelve municipal precincts, and is governed by an alderman, (Joshua Jonathan Smith, Esq.) a deputy, and nine other common councilmen, and other ward officers.

  • [[CASTLE COURT. - 1. is in the Strand, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from Charing Cross. - 2. is in Fleet Street, the first turning on the left in Poppin's Court going from Fleet Street, in Harp Alley, Farringdon Street. - 3. is in Castle Street, Oxford Street, four houses westward of Berner's Street. - 4. is in Fullwoood's Rents, Holborn, five houses on the right hand from Holborn, nearly opposite Chancery Lane. - 5. is in Piccadilly, about twenty-three houses on the right hand from the Haymarket, and leads into Castle Street. - 6. is in Whitecross Street, Cripplegate, at the back of Whitbread's Brewery. - 7. is in Lawrence Lane, Cheapside, about ten houses on the left hand from Cheapside, and leads into Mumford Court and Milk Street. - 8. is in Budge Row, Watling Street, at No. 10, and leads into Cloak Lane. - 9. is in Cattle Street, Turnmill Street, Clerkenwell, the first turning on the left hand going from Turnmill Street towards Saffron Hill. - 10. is in the Kingsland Road, about a furlong on the left hand from Shoreditch Church, and opposite Union Street, Hackney Road. - 11. is in Birchin Lane, Cornhill, at No. 23, and leads into Bell Yard and Gracechurch Street. - 12. is in Castle Street, Bethnal Green, the second turning on the right hand going from the back of Shoreditch Church eastward. - 13. is in Whitechapel, the first turning on the left hand in Old Castle Street, going from Wentworth Street towards Whitechapel High Street. - 14. is in Castle Lane, Southwark, about the middle of the east side of that lane, and opposite Morris's Walk. - 15. is in Southwark, on the south side of Kent Street, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from St. George's Church. - 16. is in Westminster, in Little Chapel Street, Broadway. - 17. is in Poplar, at No. 63, Penny Fields.
  • CASTLE AND FALCON INN, THE]], Aldersgate Street, a considerable coach and waggon office and hotel, is situated about a furlong on the right hand going from Newgate Street along St. Martin's-le-Grand, five houses northward of St. Ann's Lane, by the new Post Office.
  • CASTLE INN, Wood Street, Cheapside, a large country Inn and waggon office, is about twenty-six houses on the right hand going from Cheapside.
  • [[CASTLE LANE. - 1. is in Westminster, on the east end of James Street, Buckingham Gate, near York Street, and about a quarter of a mile on the right hand going from Buckingham Gate. It leads to Elliott's Brewery and Brewer Street, Pimlico. - 2. is in Whitechapel, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand beyond Leadenhall Street, and leads to Old Castle Street and Wentworth Street. - 3. is in Bridge Street, Southwark, the first turning on the right hand in Castle Street going from Redcross Street. It leads into Maid Lane, opposite Horse Shoe Alley. - 4. is in Castle Street, Long Acre.
  • CASTLE MEWS, Oxford Street, are in Castle Street, three houses westward of Berner's Street.
  • CASTLE PASSAGE, Westminster, is in Castle Street, Ja&#0;???mes Street, Buckingham Gate.
  • [[CASTLE PLACE. - 1. is in Whitechapel, the first turning on the right hand in New Castle Street going from Whitechapel; it leads into Old Castle Street and Wentworth Street. - 2. is in Old Castle Street, Whitechapel, the first turning on the right in Castle Alley. - 3. is in Castle Lane, Westminster, the fourth turning on the right hand going from James Street, Buckingham Gate. - 4. is in Gibraltar Row, St. George's Fields, the first turning on the left hand, going from Prospect Place.
  • [[CASTLE STREET. - 1. is in Leicester Square, the first turning eastward, and parallel thereto, and leads from Great Newport Street to the King's Mews. - 2. is in Long Acre, the first street parallel to it northward; it extends from Charles Street to Little St. Martin's Lane, and is the continuation of Broker's Alley from Drury Lane. - 3. is called Castle Street East, or Little Castle Street, Oxford Street, and is the first street parallel northward to part of it. - 4. is Castle Street, West, or Great Castle Street, Oxford Street, and is the west continuation of the last; it extends from Oxford Market to Princes Street, Cavendish Square. The total length of these two streets is about one third of a mile. - 5. is in Regent Street, which it crosses above and parallel to Oxford Street northward; it is a continuation of the last into Princes Street. - 6. is in Bloomsbury, and is the first street parallel northward to Broad Street and Museum Street. It extends from Peter Street to Vine Street, and is the west continuation of Hart Street to Thorney Street. - 7. is on Saffron Hill, at No. 60, and leads into Turnmill Street, Clerkenwell, near the green. - 8. is in Air Street, Piccadilly, three houses on the right hand going from Piccadilly; it leads into Titchborne Street. - 9. is in Holborn, on the east side of Middle Row, and leads into Cursitor Street and Chancery Lane, and formerly called Castle Yard. - 10. is in Falcon Square, Aldersgate Street, at the north corner of the square; it leads into Nichol's Square, Well Street, and Jewin Street. - 11. is in Farringdon Street, between Nos. 33 and 34, on the east side, and leads into Sea Coal Lane and Snow Hill. - 12. is in Upper Thames Street, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand going from Blackfriars' Bridge to the Thames. - 13. is in Finsbury, being the second street parallel northward to Finsbury Square, at about a furlong from it, nearly opposite Artillery Place; it extends from the City Road into Paul Street. - 14. is near Bethnal Green, and extends from Cock Lane behind Shoreditch Church to Gascoigne Place; it is continued by Virginia Row to Birdcage Walk and the Hackney Road. - 15. is called New Castle Street, Bethnal Green, and is the first turning on the right hand in the last described Street, going from Shoreditch Church. - 16. is New Castle Street, Whitechapel, High Street, and nearly opposite to Red Lion Street; it is continued by New Castle Place and Old Castle Street into Wentworth Street, Spitalfields. - 17. is Old Castle Street, Whitechapel, and is the continuation of Castle Lane from Whitechapel, High Street; it leads into Wentworth Street, Spitalfields. - 18. is in Houndsditch, the second turning on the right hand going from Bishopsgate Church, and leads to Bevis Marks. - 19. is in Southwark, the first turning on the right hand in Redcross Street, going from Park Street, Borough Market; it leads into Castle Lane, Maid Lane, and Bankside. - 20. is also in Southwark, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand in Kent Street, going from Church Street, St. George's Church.
  • [[CASTLE STREET LIBRARY. - [see Tennison's Library]
  • [[CASTLE STREET SCHOOL. - [see Tennison's School]
  • [[CASTLE YARD. - 1. is in Chapel Street, Westminster, &#0;???at the east end, by the Broadway, and opposite to St. Margaret's burying ground. It leads into Snow's Rents and York Street. - 2. is in Royal Hospital Row, Chelsea, a narrow passage near the Hospital, which leads into Turk's Row, and is situated between Anderson's Yard and Loveland's Yard. - 3. is in Castle Street, Holborn, at No. 37, and leads into Norwich Court and Fetter Lane. - 4. is in Castle Street, Oxford Street, the second turning on the left hand from Oxford Street. - 5. is in Upper Thames Street, opposite Lambeth Hill, and nearly a quarter of a mile from Blackfriars' Bridge, and leads towards the Thames. - 6. is in Gravel Lane, Christ Church, Surrey, the first turning on the left hand going from Holland Street, Blackfriars' Bridge Road, behind the Falcon Glass House. - 7. is at Poplar, the first turning on the left from the Commercial Road.
  • CASTOR PLACE, Poplar, is in the Commercial Road, near Penny Fields.
  • CATEATON STREET, Milk Street, Cheapside, is at the north end of it, extending to the Old Jewry, parallel to Cheapside.
  • CATH AND CAIN'S LEGAL WAREHOUSE, Bury Street, St. Mary Axe, is on the same principle as a sufferance wharf, where goods may be deposited without payment of duties, as specified in the Warehousing Act. - [see Legal Quays]
  • CATHERINE BUILDINGS, Westminster, are the first turning on the right hand in William Street, a few yards from James Street, Buckingham Gate.
  • St. CATHERINE or KATHERINE, COLEMAN]], the Church of, is situated on the east side of Church Row, on the south side of Fenchurch Street, about ten houses eastward of Mark Lane, with which it also communicates. It derives its name and addition from being dedicated to St. Katherine, a virgin and martyr of Alexandria, and from being situated on a spot anciently called Coleman Haw. It is a very ancient rectory, as there are records of its being so in 1346. The old church was substantially repaired, and a south aisle added in 1489, by Sir William White, then Lord Mayor of London. It escaped the great fire of 1666; but being very much out of repair, and much buried by the raising of the causeway in Fenchurch Street, it was pulled down in 1734, and the present church erected at the expense of the parish. It is a plain, well built church, with a lofty nave, lighted with two rows of windows. The tower is square, and finished with embrasures, and the floor of the church is elevated several steps above the level of its surrounding churchyard.

This church was originally in the patronage of the Dean of St. Martin's-le-Grand, and so continued till that religious house, with all its appurtenances, was annexed to the Abbey of Westminster, after which it fell to the ground, and the advowson was given by Queen Mary, in the first year of her reign, to the Bishop of London and his successors in that see for ever.

The advowson is still under the same patronage, and the present rector is the Rev. Thomas Home, who was instituted in 1812.

  • St. CATHERINE or KATHERINE CREE, the Church of, is situated at the south east angle of Cree Church Lane, in Leadenhall Street. It is dedicated to the same virgin saint and martyr as the preceding, and is distinguished from other churches of the same name by the addition of Cree, the ancient English method of spelling Christ, as pronounced by the French, having been built on the site of a dissolved priory, whose Church was called that of our Saviour Christ. They, therefore, dedicated it to St. Catherine, and added the original name of the priory by way of distinction. Henry VIII., in his grant of the priory to Sir Thomas, afterwards Lord Audley, gave him also the patronage of the church. Upon the death o&#0;???f this nobleman he bequeathed it to the Master and Fellows of Magdalene College, Cambridge, and their successors, whom he enjoined to serve the cure for ever. That corporation leased out the impropriation to the parish for 99 years; but a dispute arising between the College and the parish at the expiration of the said lease in 1725, about a renewal, a lease was granted to Jerome Knapp, Esq., a citizen and haberdasher of London, and an agreement, which was confirmed by act of parliament in 1727, was entered into concerning a commutation in lieu of tithes.

The present structure was erected in 1630, it is built of stone in a mixed and impure style. The length of the body is ninety feet, the breadth fifty one, and the height thirty seven.

Maitland, who appears to have been followed by every successive writer that I have looked into, says that the church is a curacy, and that the parishioners have the privilege of electing their own minister, who must be licensed by the Bishop of London. But the Clerical Guide, which must be of authority, says that it is a vicarage, and still in the gift of the Master and Fellows of Magdalene College, Cambridge, who instituted the Rev. George Hodson in 1814.

  • [[CATHERINE COURT. - 1. is in Great Peter Street, Westminster, at the west end, between the Elephant and Castle and Duck Lane. - 2. is in Goswell Street, nearly opposite Little Sutton Street, a few houses northward of Old Street. - 3. is in Seething Lane, the second turning on the right hand going from Great Tower Street, and leads to Tower Hill. - 4. is in Catherine Street, Commercial Road, the first turning on the right hand, a few houses from the Commercial Road.
  • [[St. CATHERINE DOCKS. - [see St. Katherine Docks]
  • [[St. CATHERINE'S HOSPITAL. - [see St. Katherine's Hospital]
  • CATHERINE STREET, Westminster, is the first turning on the right hand in William Street, going from James Street towards Palace Street and Pimlico.
  • CATHERINE STREET, Strand, is opposite Somerset Place, and leads into Bridge's Street, Russell Street, and Covent Garden.
  • CATHERINE St., LITTLE, Strand, turns off at No. 11, in the last described street, and leads into Eagle Court, White Hart Court, and Drury Lane.
  • CATHERINE STREET, Commercial Road, is the third turning on the right hand in the road eastward of Cannon Street, New Road, and extends to Lower Chapman Street.
  • CATHERINE WHEEL ALLEY, Bishopsgate Without, is about twelve houses on the right hand northward of New Street, and leads into Middlesex Street, formerly Petticoat Lane.
  • CATHERINE WHEEL COURT, Bridgewater Gardens, Barbican, is behind the Catherine Wheel Inn, and leads into Pump Court.
  • CATHERINE WHEEL YARD, LITTLE]], St. James's, is at the bottom of James Street by the Green Park, and leads into Cleveland Row.
  • CATHERINE WHEEL INN, Bishopsgate Without, a considerable coach and waggon booking office, is a few houses northward of New Street by Catherine wheel Alley, on the east side of Bishopsgate Street.
  • CATHERINE WHEEL INN, High Street, Southwark, a large establishment principally connected with Kent and Surrey, is situated about a furlong on the right hand going from St. Margaret's Hill towards St. George's Church, nearly opposite the Half Moon.
  • CATHERINE WHEEL YARD, Great Windmill Street, Haymarket, is the second turning on the right hand, a few houses from Piccadilly.
  • CATO STREET, John Street, Edgeware Road, is the second turning on the right hand from the Edgeware Road, under an archway. This street was the scene of the weak and wicked conspiracy, known by the name of the Cato Street conspiracy. This monstrous plot, which, for imbecility, is almost unequalled, was discovered early in 1820, when nine persons, who had assembled with the intention of assassinating the whole of his Majesty's ministers, while assembled at a dinner party at Lord Harrowby's, were secured by Colonel Fitzclarence, and a small party of the police. The leader of the party, Thistlewood, was to have presented a red messenger's box at the door, to be delivered as a despatch, and while in waiting, was to have opened the door and let in the rest of his gang, who were to rush up stairs and murder them all. Several pistols, swords, and hand grenades, were found in the room where the conspirators assembled. Eleven of the conspirators were committed to the Tower, five of whom, Thistlewood, Tidd, Brunt, Ings and Davidson, were tried, convicted, and executed at the Old Bailey. The other six pleaded guilty, and their sentence was commuted.
  • CATSHEAD COURT, Westminster, is the third turning on the left hand in Orchard Street, a few houses from Dean Street.
  • CAVENDISH COURT, Houndsditch, is about twelve houses on the left hand going from Bishopsgate Church.
  • CAVENDISH MEWS, Duke Street, Portland Place, are at the first gateway from No. 13, New Cavendish Street.
  • CAVENDISH MEWS, NORTH]], Charlotte Street, Portland Place, are three houses on the left hand from New Cavendish Square.
  • CAVENDISH SQUARE, Mary-le-bone, is at the north end of Holles Street going from Oxford Street. It is a spacious area of between two and three acres in extent, with a well planted pleasure ground in the middle. This square has several fine mansions, particularly Harcourt House, on the west side, designed by Inigo Jones, for the noble family whose name it bears; it is at present inhabited by the Duke of Portland. The north side has a row of handsome houses tastefully embellished with Corinthian columns, erected on the site of an intended mansion for the Duke of Chandos, the Visto of Pope's Satires. They are inhabited by Mrs. Tuffnell, by whose family they were built, by the Earl of Charleville, Lord Viscount Beresford and other gentlemen of distinction. On the west side are the mansions of Lord Viscount Dungannon, built by the late Lord Bingley, Sir Claude Scott and Mr. Hamlet. The south side are houses of a more moderate size, principally inhabited by physicians, and occupied as hotels. In the centre of the garden is the much ridiculed statue of William, Duke of Cumberland.
  • CAVENDISH STREET, NEW]], Portland Place, crosses that place at No. 61, and extends from Great Portland Street to Harley Street.
  • CAVENDISH STREET, OLD]], Oxford Street, is about the middle of the north side of that street, and leading into Henrietta Street and Cavendish Square.
  • CECIL COURT, Charing Cross, is in St. Martin's Lane, nearly opposite New Street, and leads into Castle Street, Leicester Square.
  • CECIL STREET, Strand, is nearly opposite Southampton Street, Covent Garden, and leads downwards to the Thames.
  • St. CHAD'S ROW, Gray's Inn Lane, is a turning in Constitution Row, about twenty-five houses on the right before coming to King's Cross, formerly Battle Bridge.
  • St. CHAD'S WELLS, a spring of medicinal water near the above, to which it gives its name.
  • CHAIR COURT, Temple Bar, is the first turning on the right in Ship Yard, going from Temple Bar.
  • CHALCROFT TERRACE, Blackfriars' Road is by No. 16, Great Charlotte Street, leading from the bridge foot to Surrey Chapel.
  • CHALTON COURT, Somers Town, is about the middle of the east side of Chalton Street.
  • CHALTON STREET, Somers Town, is the fourth turning on the right hand in the New Road, going from King's Cross, formerly Battle Bridge; it leads towards the Polygon or Clarendon Square.
  • CHAMBERS' SQUARE, Upper East Smithfield, is nearly opposite the western entrance to the London Docks.
  • CHAMBERS' STREET, Goodman's Fields, is the first street parallel to Great Prescott Street, southward. It extends from the south end of Mansel Street to Lemon Street.
  • CHAMBERLAIN'S OFFICE, Guildhall, is up the steps on the north side of the hall, the first turning on the right hand side, opposite the hall-keeper's office. The chamberlain of the city is an officer of great repute and trust; and, though elected annually, is never displaced unless for some flagrant crime. He ranks next the recorder in the order of precedence; he is the duty treasurer, and, as such, receives all the money belonging to the corporation, for which he annually accounts to the auditors; he has also the charge of all its bonds and securities, and the counterparts of the city leases, for which reason he gives great security for the fidelity of his conduct. The chamberlain is usually elected from such of the aldermen as have passed the chair; but such a qualification in the candidate is not absolutely necessary; and such election is in the livery, at their annual common hall on Midsummer day. He holds a court, called the Chamberlain's Court, daily, to determine differences between masters and apprentices to enrol and turn over the latter, and to admit all who are duly qualified to the freedom of the city.

The office of Chamberlain of London was anciently vested in the crown, and appears to have been then, as well as now, a profitable office; for, in 1204, William de St. Michael obtained it for a fine of one hundred pounds, and an annual rent of one hundred marks. This important office was held in 1696 by Sir Thomas Coddon, Knt., who was succeeded, in 1702, by Sir William Fazakerley, Knt. Sir George Ludlam, Knt. was elected in 1718; Samuel Robinson, Esq., in 1727; Sir John Bosworth, Knt., in 1734, when there was a severe contest between the partisans of the ministry and the independent members of the livery. The candidates were Mr. John Bosworth, a tobacconist, of Newgate Street; Mr. William Selwin, a silkman, in Patern&#0;???oster Row; and Mr. John Thomas, a fishmonger, near the Monument, who, having no shew of hands at the common hall, withdrew. The numbers, however, for the other two candidates appeared so equal, that a poll was demanded by the friends of Mr. Selwin against Mr. Bosworth, who was declared, by the sheriffs, to have the majority. Mr. Selwin having solicited the ministerial party to oblige all their dependants to vote for him, offended the independent liverymen, although he had been previously as well respected by his fellow citizens as his competitor. The contest lasted seven days, and was the warmest then ever known, the citizens being determined to preserve their freedom of election against any ministerial influence. On the dose of the poll, the numbers appeared so equal, that a scrutiny was demanded, and when the final declaration was made, it appeared that Mr. Bosworth's number was 3,212, and Mr. Selwin's 3,208. In consequence of which, to the great satisfaction of the independent part of the citizens, Mr. Bosworth was declared to be duly elected Chamberlain of the City of London, and was subsequently knighted by the king. The ministry, however, resented it, by taking away the office of receiver general of the land tax from the Chamberlain, and conferring it on their disappointed friend Mr. Selwin. This gentleman was succeeded in 1751 by Sir Thomas Harrison, Knt. and in 1765 by Sir Stephen Theodore Jansen, Knt, who resigning his office in 1776, was succeeded by Benjamin Hopkins, Esq., after another very severe contest Aldermen Wilkes and Hopkins were put in nomination, and the shew of hands appearing greatly in favour of Mr. Wilkes, a poll was demanded by his opponent. At the close of the poll, the numbers were for Alderman Hopkins 2,887, and for Alderman Wilkes 2,710, and the former was of course declared duly elected. Alderman Hopkins resigned his gown as alderman of Broad Street Ward on the 15th of March, 1776, and on the following day Richard Clarke, Esq., the present (1830) Chamberlain, was unanimously elected in his stead. In 1779 another election occurred in the room of Mr. Hopkins, when Alderman Wilkes became candidate again, with a Mr. James, when the former was elected by a very great majority. On the death of Wilkes on the 26th of December, 1797, another vacancy occurred, when at a common hall, held on the 2nd of January, 1798, Aldermen Sir Watkin Lewes, and Richard Clarke, Esq., were proposed to the livery. On the shew of hands, there was a great majority in favour of the latter, but a poll being demanded, it commenced at half past two and closed at four, when the numbers being 303 for Alderman Clarke, and 48 for Sir Watkin Lewes, the latter declined, and Mr. Clarke was elected, and still holds his honourable situation, although beyond his ninetieth year, with credit to himself, and utility to his follow citizens.

  • CHAMBERLAIN'S (THE LORD) OFFICE, is in the Stable Yard, St. James's. The Lord Chamberlain is a great officer of the King's Household, who has the superintendence of all the officers above stairs, except the precinct of the King's bed chamber, which is under the government of the Groom of the Stole. His lordship has the control over the King's chaplains, although a layman, also of the officers of the wardrobe, beds, tents, revels, comedians, huntings, physicians, surgeons, apothecaries, literary and musical men, trades men and artizans, retained in the King's service; in fact, he has the whole management of the Royal Household. The present chief officers of this department are, the Duke of Montrose, Lord Chamberlain; General Sir Samuel Hulse, Vice Chamberlain; John Calvert, Esq., M.P., Secretary; Thomas B. Mash, Esq., Comptroller of Accounts and Superintendent of the Duties of the Department; Sir Herbert Taylor, Bart., Keeper of the Privy Purse; Sir Robert Chester, Knt, Master of the Ceremonies; a long list of Gentlemen Ushers, Grooms of the Presence Chamber; Grooms of the Great Chamber; the Marquess of Winchester, Groom of the Stole; Lo&#0;???rds of the Bedchamber; Grooms of the Bedchamber; the Earl of Mountcharles, Master of the Robes; Pages of the Presence; Pages of the Back Stairs; Gentlemen of the Privy Chamber; Serjeants at Arms; Housekeepers of the various Palaces; Messengers; a Band of Music; Robert Southey, Poet Laureat; George Colman, Examiner of Plays; Sir Frederick A. Barnard, Knt., F.R.S., Principal Librarian, and Keeper of the Medals, Drawings, &c.; a large Medical Department; Tradesmen, of all descriptions; Chaplains, &c., a list of whom may be found in the Court Calendars, Burke's Official Calendar, and other works of that description.
  • CHAMPION ALLEY, Westminster, is the second turning on the left hand in Vine Street, going from Millbank Street. It leads into the Horse Ferry Road.
  • CHANCERY COURT, St. George's in the East, is in Walburgh Street, the corner of Upper Chapman Street.
  • CHANCELLOR COURT, Shoreditch, is in Church Street, Bethnal Green, the first turning on the right hand a few houses from Shoreditch.
  • CHANCERY CHAMBERS, Chancery Lane, is the first house on the left hand in Quality Court.
  • CHANCERY, COURT OF]], is held in the New Court, Westminster Hall, lately erected by Mr. Soane, and in Lincoln's Inn Hall. It derives its name from the cancelli, or cross bars which separated it from the public who might frequent its deliberations.
  • CHANCERY OFFICE, is in Southampton Buildings, Holborn, and the hours of attendance are from 10 to 3, and from 6 to 8 in term time.
  • CHANCERY LANE, Fleet Street, is about ten houses eastward of Temple Bar, and extends into High Holborn, nearly opposite Warwick Court.
  • CHANCERY, MASTERS IN]], OFFICE]], Southampton Buildings, Holborn, is facing the entrance from Holborn, and four houses on the right hand from Chancery Lane; the hours of attendance are from 10 to 2, and from 6 to 8 in term time.
  • CHANDLERS' HALL, Dowgate Hill, is about five houses on the right hand from Budge Row, or the west end of Cannon Street. - [see Tallow Chandlers' Hall]
  • CHANDLERS' RENTS, Addle Hill, Doctors' Commons, is opposite Great Carter Lane, and leads by St. Andrew's Church to St. Andrew's Hill.
  • CHANDLER STREET, Grosvenor Square, is about thirteen houses on the left hand in Duke Street, going from Oxford Street. It extends into Davies Street.
  • CHANDOS STREET, Cavendish Square, is at the north east corner of the square and leads into Queen Ann Street West.
  • CHANDOS STREET, Covent Garden, is about nine houses on the left hand in Bedford Street, going from the Strand, and extends into St. Martin's Lane. A great part of this street is now being taken down for the Strand improvements.
  • CHANGE ALLEY, Cornhill, is situated between No. 24, Cornhill, and No. 70, Lombard Street; it also leads into Birchin Lane.
  • CHANGE, OLD]], Cheapside, is five houses on the right hand from St. Paul's Churchyard, and extends into &#0;???Old Fish Street.
  • [[CHAPEL COURT. - 1. is in Long Acre, about fourteen houses on the left hand going from St. Martin's Lane; it leads into Castle Street. - 2. is in Oxford Street, about two thirds of a mile on the right hand from St. Giles's, and nearly opposite New Bond Street; it leads to Oxford Chapel and Henrietta Street. - 3. is in Swallow Street, Piccadilly, near the middle of the east side, and leads into King Street, Golden Square. - 4. is in South Audley Street, six houses eastward of Mount Street, Grosvenor Square, and on the south side of the chapel; one is called Chapel Court North, and the other Chapel Court South. - 5. is in Hart Street, Wood Street, Cheapside, and is the continuation of Hart Street from Wood Street, facing London Wall. - 6. is in Holywell Street, Mile End Old Town, about four or five houses on the left hand from Union Street, and extends to the south side of Zion Chapel. - 7. is in High Street, Southwark, about one third of a mile on the left hand from London Bridge, and leads into Mermaid Court. - 8. is in Bedford Row, on the west side of the chapel. - 9. is in Queen Square, the south west corner, by the chapel. - 10. is in Quaker Street, Spitalfields, about nine houses on the right hand from Wheeler Street. - 11. is in Jewry Street, about four houses on the right hand from Aldgate. - 12. is in Mile's Lane, Cannon Street. - 13. is in Gilbert Street, Bloomsbury. - 14. is in Clements' Inn Passage, Strand. - 15. is in King Street, Golden Square. - 16. is in Tooley Street. - 17. is at No. 11, Essex Street, Whitechapel. - 18. is at No. 30, Norfolk Street, Strand. - 19. is in New Street, Shane Street. - 20. is in Holloway Street, Commercial Road.
  • CHAPEL, HENRY THE SEVENTH'S. - [see Henry the Seventh's Chapel]

And for the rest of the chapels in and about the metropolis, the reader is referred to them under their respective names.

  • CHAPEL MEWS, Grosvenor Place, Hyde Park Corner, are in Chapel Street, behind Grosvenor Place.
  • CHAPEL MEWS, Portland Place, are at No, 20, Duke Street, Foley Place, by Portland Chapel.
  • CHAPEL PASSAGE, Oxford Street, is in Upper Rathbone Place, on the south side of the chapel.
  • [[CHAPEL PLACE. - 1. is in Oxford Street, the first turning on the right hand in Vere Street. It circumscribes Oxford Chapel on the south and east sides. - 2. is near St. James's Park, four houses northward of Great George Street. - 3. is in Spital Square, opposite the Chapel, in Chapel Yard. - 4. is in Great Suffolk Street, Southwark, the second turning on the left from Blackman Street. - 5. is in Little Coram Street, Tavistock Square, two houses on the left from Tavistock Place. - 6. is in Duke Street, St. George's Fields, near the chapel, a few yards on the right hand from the bridge road, near the Obelisk. - 7. is in Long Lane, Bermondsey, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from St. George's Church. - 8. is at No. 9. Crown Street, Soho. - 9. is in Chapel Street, Pentonville. - 10. is at No. 30. in the Poultry. - 11. is in Clement's Lane, Pickett Street, Strand. - 12. is at No. 16, Little Wild Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields.
  • [[CHAPEL ROW. - 1. is at Brompton, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand in Rawstome Street, going from Knightsbridge, by the chapel behind Brompton Row. - 2. is in Spa Fields, Clerkenwell, in Exmouth Street, the west side of the chapel, a few doors on the right hand in Bayne's Row, going from Coppice Row, by the House of Correction. - 3. is in St. George's Market, St. George's Fields, the corner of Brick Street, on the north east side of the said market. - 4. is in South L&#0;???ambeth; the row of which the chapel forms a part, is situate in the field dividing the Wandsworth and South Lambeth roads, about a quarter of a mile from Vauxhall Turnpike. - 5. is in New Street, Sloane Street, Chelsea.
  • CHAPEL ROYAL, a chapel in each of the King's palaces, which are under the government of a dean, who acknowledges no superior but the King; for the royal chapels are exempt from episcopal jurisdiction. The officers of the Chapel Royal, St. James's, are, Charles James, Bishop of London, Dean of the Chapel; Robert James, Bishop of Chichester, Clerk of the King's Closet; the Rev. T. Hughes, D.D., J. S. Clarke, D.C.L. and F. W. Blomberg, D.D., Deputy Clerks; the Rev. Wm. Holmes, M.A., Sub Dean; the Rev. Henry Fly, D.D., Confessor of the Household; forty eight Chaplains in Ordinary to his Majesty; four for each month and ten priests in ordinary, who are appointed by the Lord Chamberlain.

The officers of the Chapel Royal, Whitehall, are the Bishop of London, Dean of the Chapel; twenty-four preachers, two for each month, appointed by the Dean, and two reading chaplains. At this latter chapel, the troops quartered in Westminster attend divine service every Sunday.

  • CHAPEL STAIRS, Lincoln's Inn, is by the side of the chapel, and leads to various chambers of eminent Chancery barristers.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Brompton, is at Brompton Row, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from Knightsbridge.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Charlotte Street, Pimlico, is five houses on the right hand from Ward's Row, and about a furlong from Buckingham Palace.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Cripplegate, is near the middle of the west side of Milton Street, by the City Chapel. It leads into Half Moon Alley and Whitecross Street.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Curtain Road, is the continuation of Holywell Lane from Shoreditch, and extends from the Curtain Road to Holywell Row.
  • CHAPEL STREET, WEST]], Curzon Street, Mayfair, is on the western side of the chapel, and leads into Shepherds Market.
  • CHAPEL STREET, EAST]], Curzon Street is on the east side of the aforesaid chapel.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Grosvenor Place, or Belgrave Square, is about a third of a mile on the right hand from the triumphal arch that forms the entrance to the grounds of Buckingham Palace, and leads into Belgrave Square and its new streets. It takes its name from Grosvenor Place Chapel, a very handsome building of the Ionic order, by Mr. Smirke.
  • CHAPEL STREET, WEST]], Belgrave Square, is a continuation of the above, at the south west angle of the square. It leads into the new streets at the back of Cadogan Place.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Grosvenor Square, is opposite Grosvenor chapel in South Audley Street, crosses Park Street to the westward, and terminates in Park Lane, a short distance southward of the reservoir.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Hackney Road, is in Queen Street, near King Street.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Lamb's Conduit Street, Red Lion Square, turns off at No. 26, and extends into Millman Street, James Street, and Bedford Row.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Mile End New Town, is the first turning on the right hand in Great Garden Street, leading from No. 50, Whitechapel Road, and is continued&#0;??? by Princes Street to Baker's Row.
  • CHAPEL STREET, GREAT]], Oxford Street, is about the sixth of a mile on the left hand from St. Giles's, leading into Carlisle Street, Soho Square.
  • CHAPEL STREET, LITTLE]], Oxford Street, is at the south end of the preceding, at the right hand, and leads into Wardour Street.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Paddington, is between Lisson Grove, and No. 100, Edgware Road.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Paddington, or Lisson Grove, Edgware Road, is about half a mile on the right hand from Tyburn Turnpike, leading to Southampton Row, by the Yorkshire Stingo.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Pentonville, is by the side of the chapel of St. James, on the north side of the road, and leads from King's Cross, late Battle Bridge, to the Angel, at Islington.
  • CHAPEL STREET, St. George's in the East, is in Chapman Street, Cannon Street Road, parallel to and between Upper and Lower Chapman Streets. It extends from Walburgh Street to Mary Street, Commercial Road.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Spitalfields, is the first turning on the left hand in Wheeler Street, going from Lamb Street.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Spital Square, is the second turning on the left hand in that square from Bishopsgate Without.
  • CHAPEL STREET, Tottenham Court Road, is at No, 84, the first turning southward of Whitfield's Chapel, and extends into John Street.
  • CHAPEL STREET, GREAT]], Westminster, extends from the Broadway, and the west end of Tothill Street to Little Chapel Street.
  • CHAPEL STREET, LITTLE]], Westminster, is the first street south, parallel to York Street, and extends from James Street, Pimlico, to Great Chapel Street, Broadway.
  • CHAPEL YARD, Spital Square. - [see Chapel Street, Spital Square]
  • CHAPMAN'S BUILDINGS, Southwark, is about a furlong on the right hand from High Street, in Bowling Green Lane, King Street, Borough.
  • CHAPMAN'S COURT, Goodman's Fields, is the second turning on the right hand in Goodman's Yard, going from the Minories.
  • CHAPMAN PLACE, St. George's in the East, is the third turning on the left hand in Chapman Street, going from Cannon Street Road, and is situated between Anthony Street and Ann Street. It leads into Chapel Street.
  • CHAPMAN STREET LOWER, Cannon Street Road, is the first turning on the left hand going from the Commercial Road towards Back Lane, and extending to Duke Street.
  • CHAPMAN STREET, UPPER]], Cannon Street Road, is the first turning on the right hand from Back Lane, going towards Whitechapel. It extends to Duke Street.
  • CHAPTER COFFEE HOUSE, Paternoster Row, a coffee house formerly of great literary reputation, and where Dr. Johnson and his companions often met in discussion.
  • CHAPTER HOUSE COURT, St. Paul's Churchyard, is on the north side of the churchyard, at the corner of the Chapter House, whence it derives its name; it leads into Paternoster Row, by the side of the Chapter Coffee House, and opposite Ivy Lane.
  • CHAPTER HOUSE, St. Paul's Chu&#0;???rchyard, is a substantial brick building on the north side of the churchyard, at the corner of Chapter House Court. It belongs to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, and is celebrated for being the place wherein the convocation of the province of Canterbury formerly sat to debate about ecclesiastical affairs, and to form canons for the government of the church. But although the upper and lower house of convocation are called by the king's writ at every session of parliament, they are as constantly prorogued and dismissed by his majesty's authority.
  • CHAPTER STREET, Westminster, is in the Vauxhall Bridge Road, near Vincent Square.
  • CHARING CROSS, is the west continuation of the Strand, from St. Martin's Lane to the King's Mews, also towards Westminster as far as the Admiralty and Scotland Yard. It derives its name from the ancient village of Charing, in which Edward I. caused a magnificent cross to be erected in commemoration of his beloved Queen Eleanor. A portion of this structure remained till the civil wars in the reign of Charles I., when it was destroyed by the Puritans, as a monument of Popish superstition. After the restoration of Charles II., the equestrian statue of his ill-advised and unfortunate father, that had been taken down by order of Oliver Cromwell, and concealed during the whole of his protectorate, was erected on the site of the ancient Cross, and thus the name of Charing Cross is still retained. This statue, by the celebrated Le Sueur, is one of the finest equestrian statues of any age or country; and has also the advantage of being in a very commanding situation.
  • CHARING COURT, Lambeth, is the first turning on the left hand in Fore Street, southward of Broad Street.
  • CHARITY SCHOOLS, The various, are, to be found under their respective initials.
  • [[CHARLES COURT. - 1. is in the Strand, the first turning on the right hand going from Charing Cross; it leads into Hungerford Market and to Charles Court Stairs, which are on the eastern side of Hungerford Stairs. - 2. is in Charles Street, St. George's in the East, the first turning on the left hand from Old Gravel Lane. - 3. is in Southwark, two doors on the left hand in Park Street, Borough Market. - 4. is in Bartholomew Close. - 5. is in Featherstone Street, City Road. - 6. is in High Street, Poplar. - 7. is in Hall Street, Spitalfields, near Brick Lane.
  • [[CHARLES PLACE. - 1. is in Baker's Row, Coldbath Fields, the second turning on the right hand from Little Warner Street. - 2. is in Hoxton, the second turning on the left hand in Brunswick Place, near St. Luke's Hospital. - 3. is in Bethnal Green Road, the north west corner of Thorold Square, about a quarter of a mile from Shoreditch. - 4. is near the Halfway House, Lower Road, Deptford. - 5. is in East Lane, Walworth. - 6. is in the East India Dock Road, Poplar, near the turnpike.
  • CHARLES SQUARE, Hoxton, is a small neat square, near Pitfield Street, on the north side of the Vinegar Yard, the first turning on the left hand going from Old Street.
  • CHARLES SQUARE, St. George's in the East, is near Charles Street, Old Gravel Lane.
  • CHARLES STREET, Charles Square, is the continuation of Craven Buildings, from the City Road to Charles Square and Pitfield Street.
  • CHARLES STREET, Parliament Street, Westminster, is about fourteen houses on the right hand in Whitehall, extending to Duke Street.
  • [[CHARLES &#0;???STREET]], LITTLE]], Westminster, is the east end of the last, between Parliament Street and King Street.
  • CHARLES STREET, St. James's Square, is near the middle of the east side of the square, intersecting, Regent Street, and extending from the Haymarket to the square.
  • CHARLES STREET, Long Acre, is at No. 84, on the north side, the first turning on the right hand from Drury Lane; it extends to Castle Street and Broker's Alley.
  • CHARLES STREET, Covent Garden, is on the east side, six doors on the right hand in Russell Street, from Covent Garden, and extends into York Street and Tavistock Street.
  • CHARLES STREET, Portman Square, is the first street parallel westward, to part of Baker Street, and extends from George Street to King Street.
  • CHARLES STREET, Hampstead Road, is on the west side, about a furlong on the left hand from Tottenham Court Road.
  • CHARLES STREET, LITTLE]], is at the west end of the preceding, or at the north end of Brook Street, on the left from the New Road.
  • CHARLES STREET, Drury Lane, is at No. 174, on the left hand from St. Giles, and leads into Newton Street, and to No. 206, High Holborn.
  • CHARLES STREET, Hatton Garden, crosses that street at No. 24, and extends from Leather Lane to Saffron Hill.
  • CHARLES STREET, Grosvenor Square, is at the south east corner of the square, and leads into Mount Street, Berkeley Square.
  • CHARLES STREET, Berkeley Square, extends from the south west corner of the square into Union Street, near South Audley Street.
  • CHARLES STREET, Soho Square, on the north side of the square, and leads into Oxford Street, being the first turning on the left hand in Oxford Street, and about thirty houses from St. Giles's.
  • CHARLES STREET, Manchester Square, is the first street parallel northward to the square, and extends from Manchester Street to Thayer Street.
  • CHARLES STREET, Middlesex Hospital, is on the south side of the square, extending from Newman Street to Wells Street.
  • CHARLES STREET, Bridgewater Square, is parallel eastward to the square, at the back of No. 9; it leads into Bridgewater Gardens.
  • CHARLES STREET, Finsbury, is the first turning on the left hand in Leonard Street, going from Paul Street towards the Curtain Road; it leads into Willow Walk.
  • CHARLES STREET, Curtain Road, is the second turning on the left hand northward of Holywell Lane, and leads into John Street.
  • CHARLES STREET, Bethnal Green Road, is about three quarters of a mile on the right hand from Shoreditch, opposite Wilmot Square.
  • CHARLES STREET, Mile End New Town, is the north continuation of Baker's Row, going from Whitechapel Road.
  • CHARLES STREET, St. George's in the East, is at No. 44, Old Gravel Lane, about the middle of the east side.
  • CHARLES STREET, Westminster Bridge Road, is the second turning on the left hand, going from the Obelisk towards the Asylum for Female Orphans; it leads into Gower Street.
  • CHARLES STREET, Blackfriars' Road. Is the fifth turning on the left hand, about a quarter of a mile from the bridge going towards the Obelisk; it leads into Robert Street. CHARLES STREET]], Horselydown, extends from, Church Row on the east side of St. John's Church to New Street, Dock Head.
  • CHARLES STREET, Southwark, is the second turning on the left hand in Glean Alley, going from Tooley Street.
  • CHARLES STREET, Goswell Street, is at the north end of that street; it leads into Taylor's Row and Islington Road.
  • CHARLES STREET, Lambeth Marsh, is the first street parallel southward between the road and Oakley Street, nearly opposite James Street.
  • CHARLES STREET, Mile End Old Town, extends from Plumbers Row to Greenfield Street, Commercial Road.
  • CHARLES STREET, Goswell Street Road, is the east continuation of Goswell Place, and extends into Northampton Terrace, City Road.
  • CHARLES STREET, Somers Town, is the west continuation of Phoenix Street, by the Polygon in Clarendon Square.
  • CHARLES STREET, St. George's in the East is about one sixth of a mile on the left hand in Back Lane, eastward of Cannon Street Turnpike, nearly opposite the Blue Gate Fields and leads to Albion Street and the Commercial Road.
  • CHARLOTTE CHAPEL, Rathbone Place, is an episcopal chapel in Charlotte Street, and nearly opposite Windmill Street, Tottenham Court Road.
  • [[CHARLOTTE COURT. - 1. is in Redcross Street, Cripplegate, at No. 28, by the church, two doors from Jewin Street. - 2. is in Charlotte Street, Whitechapel, the first turning on the left hand from Fieldgate Street, and nearly opposite Gloucester Street. - 3. is in Black Lion Yard, Whitechapel Road, the first turning on the left a few houses below the church on the opposite side. - 4. is in Moss's Alley, Bankside, about the middle of the east side between Bankside and Maid Lane.
  • CHARLOTTE MEWS, EAST]], Charlotte Street, Portland Place, are three houses on the right hand from Upper Mary-le-bone Street.
  • CHARLOTTE MEWS, WEST]], Charlotte Street, Portland Place, are at No. 71, three doors from Weymouth Street.
  • CHARLOTTE MEWS, Charlotte Street, Bloomsbury, are about six houses on the left hand going towards Hart Street, and facing Vine Street from Broad Street, Bloomsbury.
  • CHARLOTTE PLACE, Southwark, is part of the north side of the Borough Road, near the King's Bench Prison; it leads towards the Obelisk near the Surrey Theatre.
  • CHARLOTTE PLACE, Bermondsey, is part of the east side of the Grange Road, the first Row on the left hand from Fort Place towards the Green Man Turnpike, Kent Road.
  • CHARLOTTE PLACE, Lambeth Marsh, forms part of the north side of the road, about an equal distance from Surrey Chapel and the Marsh Gate.
  • [[CHARLOTTE ROW. - 1. is in the New Road, Mary-le-bone, and forms that part of the south side of the road which joins the Yorkshire Stingo. - 2. is in Mansion House Street, City, and forms the west side of the Mansion House; It extends from the Poultry to Walbrook, and Bucklersbury. - 3. is in Bermondsey, and forms part of the north side of Long Lane, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from St. George's Church. - 4. LITTLE]], at the back of the last entries at the east end. - 5. is in Walworth, and forms part of the west side of the road, about a quarter of a mi&#0;???le on the right hand from the Elephant and Castle. - 6. is in Bermondsey, the west end of Jamaica Row near the Gregorian Arms. - 7. is near Circus Street, New Road, Mary-le-bone. - 8. is at Rotherhithe, and turns off at No. 269, in Rotherhithe Street, about half a mile on the right hand below the church, on the east side the Surrey Canal.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, Pimlico, is the first turning on the left handy about a furlong from Buckingham Palace on the road towards Chelsea; it leads into Palace Street, William Street, and James Street, Pimlico.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, Hans Town, is a few houses on the right hand in the New Road that leads from the north end of Sloane Street, near Knightsbridge.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, Portland Place, is parallel to and between Portland Place and Great Portland Street, commencing at the east end of New Cavendish Street.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, Rathbone Place, is the continuation of that street from Oxford Street, extending, from Percy Street to Howland Street.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, LITTLE]], Rathbone Place, parallel westward to the last, and extends from Bennet Street to Goodge Street.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, Pentonville, is about three quarters of a mile on the left hand from Clerkenwell Green, and nearly opposite Hamilton Place; it leads to Britannia Street and Gray's Inn Lane.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, Bloomsbury, is the continuation of Plumtree Street from Broad Street, and extends from Thorney Street to Great Russell Street.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, Bedford Square, is the north continuation of the last street, and extends from Great Russell Street to the south east corner of the square.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, Shoreditch, is the first Street parallel westward to the Curtain Road, and extends from Willow Walk to Old Street Road.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, Whitechapel, is the east continuation of Fieldgate Street, going from Whitechapel Road, and extends to Cannon Street Road.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, Wapping, is at the west end of Great Hermitage Street, by the London Docks, and leads towards Nightingale Lane.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, GREAT]], Blackfriars' Road, is about one third of a mile on the right hand from the bridge, and opposite Surrey Chapel; it leads to the New Cut across the Waterloo Bridge Road and Lambeth Marsh by the Cobourg Theatre.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, LITTLE]], Blackfriars' Road, is opposite the last described, and extends from Surrey Chapel to Union Street, Southwark, and is continued by Duke Street, Queen Street, and Union Street to the Borough High Street.
  • CHARLOTTE STREET, Bethnal Green, is the second turning on the left hand in Turville Street, going from Church Street; it leads into Trafalgar Street and Cock Lane, behind Shoreditch Church.
  • CHARLTON COURT, Charlton Street, New Road, Mary-le-bone, is a few doors on the left hand, northward of Clipstone Street.
  • CHARLTON STREET, New Road, Mary-le-bone, is the first street parallel to Great Titchfield Street, and extends from Upper Mary-le-bone Street to Carburton Street, Fitzroy Square.
  • CHARLTON STREET, UPPER]], New Road, is the north continuation of the last, from Clipstone Street.
  • CHARRINGTON ROW, Bethnal Green Road, is in George Gardens, behind the George public house, on the east side of Wilmot Square.&#0;???
  • CHARTER HOUSE, THE]], is situated on the north side of Charter House Square, Aldersgate Street. It is one of the principal foundation schools of the metropolis. The site on which it stands was anciently part of the estates of the hospital of St. John of Jerusalem. Sir Walter Manny, one of the earliest knights of the garter, who had served with Edward III., in his wars with France, purchased it in 1349, of the knights of St. John for the purpose of interring the dead, after the dreadful plague which in that year had visited the metropolis. He built a chapel on part of the ground and named the place New Church Haw. Sir Walter conceived the design of founding a college upon this site, about the year 1360, but the whole cemetery was purchased of him, by Michael de Northbury, Bishop of London, who, in 1361, erected and founded a convent of Carthusians, an order of monks founded by St. Bruno, in the Chartreux, a steep rock in a desert near Grenoble in France. Hence its present name, which is a vulgar corruption of Chartreuse.

In the reign of Henry VIII., John Houghton, the last prior, but one, subscribed to the King's supremacy, yet was afterwards executed for some opposition to that tyrant's will. This monastery was suppressed, among others, in 1538, and granted by the crown, in 1542, to John Bridges and Thomas Hall for their joint lives; and in 1555, to Edward Lord North, who sold it to the Duke of Northumberland; and on that nobleman being attainted of high treason, it again reverted to the crown.

It was afterwards conferred on Sir Thomas Audley, Speaker of the House of Commons, with whose daughter Margaret, it passed in marriage to Thomas Howard Duke of Norfolk, who greatly improved it and made it his usual place of residence. It became afterwards his prison till his execution in the reign of Elizabeth, to whom it reverted with all his other estates. That queen, however, restored them to his family, and at the accession of James I., it was the residence of Lord Thomas Howard, second son of the above named duke; who entertained that sovereign and his suite within its walls for four successive days. James created his host. Earl of Suffolk, Lord Chamberlain, and a knight of the garter, and made not less than four score knights.

This Earl of Suffolk, who is memorable for his inordinate rapacity, sold the Chartreuse, in 1611, to Thomas Sutton, citizen and girdler, who immediately after his purchase instituted the present establishment.

This eminent citizen, the founder of the modern Charter House was born at Knaith, in Lincolnshire, in 1582, was educated at Eton, and studied the law at Lincoln's Inn. He afterwards travelled, and during his absence his father the died and left him a handsome fortune. He subsequently became a merchant, was chief victualler of the navy and captain of the barque named Sutton, among the volunteers against the Spanish Armada. He was also a main instrument of its defeat, by draining the Bank of Genoa of that money, with which Philip, King of Spain, intended to equip his fleet, and thereby delayed the invasion for a whole year.

He was also a commissioner of prises, and was successful in capturing a Spanish ship worth \\'a320,000. By these means, by marriage with a wealthy widow, by the purchase of some successful coal mines in Durham, and by his profits as a merchant, he became one of the wealthiest of the citizens of London. He lived magnificently and with great hospitality, but on the death of his wife, he retired into private life, purchased this property and founded this establishment. He applied to the king, James I., for a charter, which he speedily obtained, being dated the 22nd June 1611, about five weeks after his purchase. The governors are incorporated by this instrument, as \\ldblquote The Governors of the Islands, P&#0;???ossessions, Revenues and Goods of the Hospital of King James, founded in Charter House, within the County of Middlesex, at the humble Petition and only Coats and Charges of Thomas Sutton, Esq.\\rdblquote This benevolent man died on the 10th December 1611, at his residence in Hackney. His body was embalmed, inclosed in a leaden coffin and kept in his house till May 1612, when it was removed to Christ Church, Newgate Street, for temporary interment, until the new chapel, then building at the hospital, was ready to receive it.

The governors held their first meeting on the 30th of June, 1613, and on the 12th of December, 1614, the anniversary of his death, the coffin was borne from Christ Church to a vault on the north side of his new chapel, under a magnificent tomb, executed by Nicholas Stone. It is said that he left a fortune of \\'a35,000 a year in land, and \\'a360,000 in money.

The establishment was successfully carried on till 1624, when the hospital sustained a loss of \\'a38,000, and experienced great reverses during the civil wars in the reign of Charles I. In 1645 the parliamentary army took possession of some of its estates. In 1652 Oliver Cromwell was elected governor, and was succeeded by his son Richard in 1658. The hospital has been more fortunate since the reformation, as most of our subsequent monarchs have contributed to its success.

The Charter House is now in a very flourishing condition, and has given education to some of the first scholars of the day. The present officers are - the King, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Lord Chancellor, the Archbishop of York, the Duke of Wellington, the Marquess Camden, the Earl of Westmorland, the Earl Spencer, the Earl of Chatham, the Earl of Harrowby, Earl Grey, the Earl of Eldon, Viscount Sidmouth, Viscount Goderich, Lord Grenville, the Right Hon. Sir Robert Peel, Bart., and the Rev, Philip Fisher, D.D., Governors who present in rotation; the Rev. Philip Fisher, D.D., Master, elected in 1803; the Rev. William Hale, M.A., Preacher, 1823; the Rev. Charles Richard Pritchett, M.A., Reader and Librarian; the Rev. John Russell, D.D., Head Master of the School, 1811; the Rev. W. H. Chapman, M.A., Second Master; the Rev. Edward Churton, B.A., the Rev. Edmund H. Penny, M.A., the Rev. Andrew Irvine, B.D., the Rev. Charles R. Dicken, M.A., the Rev. William Battiscombe, B.A., and the Rev. J. J. Boone, M.A., Assistants; William George, Writing Master; Thomas Ryder, Registrar; Thomas Gattie, Auditor; John Veitch, M.D., Physician; James H. Spry, Surgeon and Apothecary; J. Stevens, Organist; W. A. Dixon, Manciple; T. Ryder, Steward of Courts; and William Pilkington, Esq., Architect and Surveyor.

  • CHARTER HOUSE LANE, St. John Street, is about twelve houses on the right hand from Smithfield, and leads into Charter House Square.
  • CHARTER HOUSE SQUARE, is situated at the east end of the preceding, between the southern end of St. John Street and Goswell Street, and is also entered from Aldersgate Street by Carthusian Street.
  • CHARTER HOUSE STREET, West Smithfield, is about the middle of the north side of Long Lane; it leads into Charter House Square.
  • CHATHAM GARDENS, City Road, is about half a mile directly northward of Finsbury Square, the second turning on the right in Trafalgar Street, Peerless Pool.
  • [[CHATHAM PLACE. - 1. is in Blackfriars, the wide part of Bridge Street, immediately adjoining the northern end of Blackfriars' Bridge. It derives its name from William Pitt, the first Earl of Chatham. [see Blackfriars' Bridge] - 2. is in Broad Street, Bloomsbury, three houses westward of Holborn, on the right hand side, nearly opposite Drury Lane. - 3. is in Walworth, and forms part of the east side of t&#0;???he High Road, about a third of a mile on the left hand from the Elephant and Castle, near Saville Row, and opposite Walworth Terrace. - 4. is in the Old Kent Road, near the Surrey Canal. - 5. is in Hackney, near Morning Lane. - 6. is in Salisbury Crescent, Walworth, and is the continuation of Pitt Street, Kent Road.
  • CHATHAM, THE EARL OF]], his Monument in Guildhall, London, is on the north side of the hall, near, the hustings. It consists of a group of colossal figures, in alto relieve, or rather of entire statues in the round. The artist's intention, in the composition, is to convey an idea of the prosperity of the British nation under this eminent statesman. He has therefore represented Lord Chatham in the dress of a Roman orator, as the pilot of the state, standing upon a rock, and resting upon a rudder, with his right arm supporting Commerce, who is seated by his side, attended by allegorical figures of the four quarters of the globe, pouring the contents of a horn of plenty into the lap of Britannia, who is seated upon her lion at the minister's feet. By the side of Britannia is the City of London, represented by a female figure, crowned with laurels, appealing to the principal figure to protect her favourite, Commerce, whom he appears most willingly to adopt. The monument is by the elder Bacon, and has more freedom of style and lightness of execution, than generally belongs to the statuary's art; in other words, it is more picturesque than sculpturesque. The inscription on the base is from the pen of Burke.

There is another monumental group to the same illustrious statesman, by the same artist, in Westminster Abbey, but it is in every respect inferior to that in Guildhall. - [see Westminster Abbey]

  • CHEAPSIDE, one of the principal streets and thoroughfares in the City, extends from the north east corner of St. Paul's Churchyard to the Old Jewry, Bucklersbury and the Poultry. It derives its name from the Saxon word Cheap, which signifies a market, the street therefore is the market side; as in the year 1331, the south side only was built upon, and the north side was an open field, where jousts or tournaments were often held. One of these given by Edward III., lasted for three days together.

This market was called West Cheap, while that beyond Cannon Street was called East Cheap. In this street, nearly opposite the end of Wood Street, stood formerly Cheapside Cross, which was one of those erected in 1290, by Edward I., in token of his affection for his deceased Queen Eleanor. It was rebuilt in 1442, by John Hatherly, Mayor of London. After the reformation it was mutilated and its statues destroyed) and in 1643, it was entirely destroyed and removed as a relic of papery by the puritanical parliament.

This street gives its name to the ward wherein it is situated. The Ward of Cheap is bounded on the east by the wards of Broad Street and Walbrook, on the north by these of Bassishaw and Coleman Street, on the west by those of Queenhithe and Cripplegate, and on the south by that of the Cordwainers. It extends from the corner of St. Mildred's Court in the Poultry, to near the corner of Milk Street, Cheapside, and from the west corner of the Mansion House, to within thirty feet of Bow Lane. It includes the Poultry, the eastern end of Cheapside, Bucklersbury, part of Pancras Lane, Queen Street and Bow Lane, on the south side of the ward and Grocers' Hall Court, part of the Old Jewry, Ironmonger Lane, King Street, Lawrence Lane, Honey Lane Market, and the principal part of Cateaton Street, on the north. The principal buildings in this ward, are the parish churches of Mildred in the Poultry and St. Mary Colechurch, Guildhall, Mercers' Hall and Chapel and Grocers' Hall. - [see these several streets and buildings]

It is divided into nine municipal precincts, and is under the government of an alderman, (William Thompson, Esq., M.P.) a deputy and eleven other common councilmen, and other ward officers.

  • CHEAPSIDE, GREAT and LITTLE]], Finsbury, are situated in that part of Long Alley, Moorfields, which leads from Crown Street towards Moorfields.
  • CHEAPSIDE, LITTLE]], Whitecross Street, is the first turning on the right in Cowheel Alley, from No. 168, Whitecross Street going towards Golden Lane.
  • CHEESEMAN'S COURT, Bethnal Green, is about six houses on the right hand, in George Street, going from Carter Street, Brick Lane.
  • CHELSEA, a large and populous village, is situated on the Middlesex bank of the river Thames, and extends from beyond Battersea or Chelsea Bridge, almost to Hyde Park Corner, and includes a considerable part of Knightsbridge. It has three churches, one near the river, by the bridge; a new one near the King's Road, recently built; and one now (1830) building in Sloane Street. - [see St. Luke's, Chelsea, the Church of]

In this parish is the Botanical Garden belonging to the Apothecaries' Company [see Apothecaries' Company]; and the village has been celebrated for nine centuries as the residence of persons of distinction. The episcopal palace of the Bishops of Winchester was, till lately, situated in Cheyne Walk; but it has been pulled down, and the town residence of the present and future bishops removed to a spacious mansion on the west side of St. James's Square. - [see Winchester House]

The celebrated Duchess of Mazarine resided here in the reign of Charles II., and first introduced foreign dramatic entertainments into this country, which led to the establishment of the Italian Opera. Eleanor Gwynn also lived here, in the house afterwards occupied, in 1722, by Sir Robert Walpole, which has been pulled down, and an infirmary for the use of the Hospital erected on its site. The great Sir Thomas More also occupied a splendid mansion in this parish, which stood at the north end of Beaufort Row, and, after being the residence of many illustrious characters, was pulled down in 1740 by Sir Hans Sloane. At the western extremity of the village is the elegant villa of Lord Cremorne, who has a good collection of pictures of the Italian and Flemish schools; and adjoining thereto is a house formerly the property and residence of Dr. Hoadley, author of the comedy of the \\ldblquote Suspicious Husband.\\rdblquote Ranleagh also stood in the parish; but its glories are faded, and its once splendid walls are desolate and deserted. The principal object of note in the parish, at the present day, is the Royal Hospital for invalid and wounded Soldiers which is noticed under its proper title.

  • [[CHELSEA COLLEGE. - [see Chelsea, The, Royal Hospital]
  • CHELSEA COMMON, is situated between Queen's Elms, Brompton, and the King's Road.
  • CHELSEA, THE]], ROYAL HOSPITAL]], is about one mile and a half from Grosvenor Place, Hyde Park Corner, going by Sloane Street, and nearly one mile and a quarter from Buckingham Palace, by Pimlico. This monument of national munificence and gratitude owes its origin to the benevolent exertions of Sir Stephen Fox, the ancestor of Lord Holland, who proposed to John Evelyn, as recorded in his diary (vol. 1, p. 535), on the 6th September, 1681, the purchasing of Chelsea College, which Charles II. had presented to the Royal Society, who were willing to dispose of it for such a purpose.

On the spot where the present Hospital stands was anciently a college for secular priests, which in the reign of James I. was&#0;??? appropriated for the residence of a certain number of divines, in order to study the Popish controversy. This building, however, being given as before mentioned, to the Royal Society, was afterwards pulled down, and the present substantial and appropriate structure erected in its stead. Sir Stephen not only persuaded the king (Charles II.) to settle \\'a35,000 a year, and erect a building of the value of \\'a320,000, but became an active friend and liberal benefactor to the establishment. The sale of the college and other arrangements were completed in the month of February 1682, and the building of the New Hospital forthwith commenced, from the designs, and under the superintendence of Sir Christopher Wren.

It is a spacious building, and a very appropriate design, remarkable for the justness and harmonious proportions of its different parts, and like many of the buildings of Palladio, is composed of brick and stone, the quoins, cornices, pediments and columns, being of the latter material. It forms three sides of a quadrangle, towards the river, and the area formed between the wings; the body of the building and the bank of the river is laid out in walks and grass paths, for a promenade. The centre of the building is embellished with a tetrastyle portico of the Roman Doric order, surmounted by a handsome lofty turret, in which is a clock.

Under the portico are the principal entrances. On one side is the chapel, the furniture and plate of which were given by King James II., and the organ was a gift of Major Ingram; and that on the other, is the hall where all the Pensioners dine. In this hall is a portrait of Charles II. on horseback, and other portraits, and a fine allegorical picture of the triumphs of the Duke of Wellington, by James Ward, Esq., RA. The altar piece of the chapel is ornamented by a picture of the Ascension, by Sebastian Ricci, and both the chapel and hall are paved with black and white marble. The whole length of the principal building is 790 feet.

In the centre of the quadrangle, next the river, is a statue of Charles II., in Roman imperial armour, and over the colonnade is an inscription in Latin, intimating that the establishment was commissioned by Charles II., continued by James II., and finished by William and Mary, in 1690. The building, however, as appears from the Lansdowne manuscripts in the British Museum, first printed in my life of Sir Christopher Wren, says it was finished in 1692.

The present officers of Chelsea Hospital are, the Great Officers of State, Commissioners; General Sir Samuel Hulse, Governor; Lieut. Gen. the Hon. Sir Alexander Hope, Lieutenant Governor, Lieut. Col. Henry Le Blanc, Major; Lieut. Col. John Wilson, Adjutant; the Paymaster General of the Land Forces, Deputy Treasurer; the Rev. William Haggett, M.A., and the Rev. Richard Yates, D.D., Chaplains; Richard Neave, Esq., Secretary and Registrar; John Fasson, Esq., Chief Clerk; seven Senior Clerks; seven Assistant Clerks; twenty-three Junior Clerks for the In-Pensioners, besides Thomas C. Brooksbank, Esq., Agent and Paymaster of the Out-Pensioners; Robert Gwilt, Esq., Chief Clerk; six Senior Clerks; six Assistant Clerks; twenty-two Junior Clerks; William Somerville, M.B., Physician; Sir Everard Home, Bart., Surgeon; John Leeds, Esq., Deputy; John Hartshome, Assistant; William North, Apothecary; William Sheldrake, Truss Maker; John Heriot, Comptroller; Poole Hickman, Steward; Mrs. Elizabeth Dalrymple, Housekeeper; Mrs. Helen Campbell, Whitster; Miss Robertson, Organist; John Soane, Esq., R. A., Clerk of the Works; John Bruce, Gardener,

  • CHELSEA MARKET, is behind a part of Lower Sloane Street, about three quarters of a mile on the left hand from Knightsbridge.
  • CHELSEA WATER WORKS OFFICE, is at No. 21, Abingdon Street, Westminster, a few doors from&#0;??? the Abbey. The Chelsea Water works are under the management of a company, incorporated by act of parliament in 1722, by the name of \\ldblquote The Governor and Company of the Chelsea Water Works\\rdblquote . The business of the company is managed by a governor, a deputy governor, and thirteen directors.
  • CHELTENHAM PLACE, Lambeth, is about three eighths of a mile on the left hand, in the Westminster Bridge Road, going from the bridge; it extends from Oakley Street towards the Asylum.
  • CHELTON'S COURT, Bedfordbury, is at No. 44, and leads into Chandos Street at No. 60, near St. Martin's Lane, Charing Cross.
  • CHENIES' MEWS, Bedford Square, are in Chenies' Street, which is parallel to and between Gower Street and Thornhaugh Street.
  • CHENIES' PLACE, Chenies' Street, is three houses eastward on the right from Alfred Place, Tottenham Court Road.
  • CHENIES' STREET, Bedford Square, is the second turning on the left hand in Gower Street, going from the square towards Tottenham Court Road, and nearly opposite Goodge Street.
  • CHEQUER ALLEY, Bunhill Row, is about one fifth of a mile on the left hand from Chiswell Street, and leads into Whitecross Street.
  • [[CHEQUER COURT. - 1. is at Charing Cross, three houses westward of St. Martin's Lane, or from the west end of the Strand. - 2. is in Chequer Alley, Bunhill Row, going towards Whitecross Street.
  • [[CHEQUER SQUARE. - 1. is in Chequer Alley, Bunhill Row, a small open space on the north side, the second turning on the right from Bunhill Row. - 2. is at Aldgate, eight houses on the right hand below the Minories.
  • CHEQUER YARD, Dowgate Hill, is the first turning on the left going towards Thames Street. It extends from No. 14, Bush Lane, to Dowgate Hill.
  • CHERRY GARDEN STREET, Somers Town, is the first turning on the west going from Millpond Bridge by Cherry Garden Stairs.
  • CHERRY GARDEN STAIRS, Bermondsey, one mile and a quarter east from London Bridge, opposite Wapping Old Stairs.
  • CHERRY TREE ALLEY, Bunhill Row, is the first turning on the left hand going from Chiswell Street.
  • [[CHERRY TREE COURT. - 1. is in Cherry Tree Alley, the last turning on the right hand going from Bunhill Row. - 2. is in Garden Lane, the third turning on the right hand from Old Street. - 3. is in Aldersgate Street, and turns off at No. 34, between Jewin Street and Barbican.
  • CHERRY TREE YARD, Kingsland Road, is nearly opposite the Basing House, by the side of the Cherry Tree public house, about a furlong on the right hand from Shoreditch Church.
  • CHERUBIM COURT, Bishopsgate Street, is the fifth turning on the left hand in Angel Alley, going from Bishopsgate Street Without.
  • [[CHESTER PLACE. - 1. is in Farringdon Street, eight houses on the left from Fleet Street, and leads up into Black Horse Court. - 2. is Lambeth, the east side of the High Road from Walcot Place to Kennington Cross. - 3. is in Bethnal Green, a few yards on the left hand from the east side of the green towards Globe Street. - 4. is in the&#0;??? Old Kent Road, near the Turnpike, by the Green Man. - 5. is in the Mile End Road, near the canal.
  • CHESTER'S QUAY, Lower Thames Street, is the second turning on the west from Tower Hill. - [see Brewer's Quay, to which this is united]
  • CHESTER STREET, Lambeth, extends from the north end of Chester Place aforesaid, to Kennington Lane.
  • CHESTER STREET, Grosvenor Place, is the third turning on the right hand from Hyde Park Corner, and leads into Belgrave Square.
  • CHESTERFIELD HOUSE, South Audley Street, is situated by the west end of Curzon Street, Mayfair, opposite Stanhope Street. It was built by the celebrated Earl of Chesterfield, and is one of the handsomest mansions in the metropolis. The wings are connected with the body of the house, by two very beautiful colonnades. The magnificent staircase was removed from the vast mansion of the Duke of Chandos, at Cannons, when it was pulled down.
  • CHESTERFIELD STREET, Berkeley Square, is the second turning on the left hand in Charles Street, Berkeley Square.
  • CHESTERFIELD STREET, GREAT]], Mary-le-bone, is situated between the west end of Weymouth and Great Mary-le-bone Street.
  • CHEYNE WALK, Chelsea, is on the north side of the Thames, and leads from Paradise Row towards Battersea Bridge.
  • CHICHESTER COURT, Chancery Lane, is three houses on the left hand in Chichester Rents, Chancery Lane.
  • [[CHICHESTER PLACE. - 1. is in Hope Town, Wandsworth Road. - 2. is near King's Cross, Battle Bridge.
  • CHICHESTER RENTS, Chancery Lane, is near the middle of the western side of Chancery Lane, and leads into Star Yard. It derives its name from being near the site of the adjacent palace of the Bishops of Chichester.
  • CHICKSAND PLACE, Whitechapel, is the second turning on the left hand in Chicksand Street going from High Street.
  • CHICKSAND STREET, Whitechapel, is the continuation of Osborne Place from Brick Lane; it derives its name from Chicksand Priory, Bedfordshire, the seat of Sir John Osborne, Bart.
  • CHIGWELL STREET, Ratcliffe Highway, is at No. 61, opposite Cannon Street, St. George's in the East.
  • CHILD'S COURT, Westminster, is the second turning on the right hand in Tothill. Street, going from the Abbey.
  • CHILD'S PLACE, Temple Bar, is three doors on the right hand in Fleet Street, going from Temple Bar. It derives its name from the celebrated bankers who built it, and whose banking house it nearly adjoins.
  • CHINA COURT, Lambeth, is the first turning on the right hand in China Row, going from China Terrace.
  • CHINA HALL, Deptford Lower Road, is about a third of a mile on the left hand from Paradise Row.
  • CHINA ROW, Lambeth, is on the west side of the Westminster Bridge Road, and extends from the south end of China Terrace to Lambeth Walk.
  • CHINA TERRACE, Lambeth, is near the new chapel opposite the St&#0;???ags, about half a mile on the right hand from Westminster Bridge.
  • CHINA WALK, Lambeth, is at Buxton Place, near the above.
  • CHIROGRAPHERS OFFICE, THE]], Temple, is in Hare Court; it has another entrance opposite Brick Court in Middle Temple Lane. The present chirographers are George Colebrooke, James Edward Colebrooke, and Henry T. Colebrooke, Esqrs. The hours of attendance are from 11 to 3.
  • CHISWELL STREET, Finsbury Square, is a considerable thoroughfare leading from the south west corner of the square to Whitecross Street, Barbican, and Aldersgate Street.
  • CHIVERS'S COURT, Limehouse, is in Nightingale Lane, about six houses on the right hand from Narrow Street.
  • CHOPPENS COURT, Wapping, is in Old Gravel Lane, at No. 35, the fourth turning on the right hand from Wapping Street.
  • CHRIST'S CHURCH, Newgate Street. This church is dedicated to the name and honour of Christ, and anciently belonged to the convent of Grey Friars or Franciscans, but falling to the crown at the dissolution of the religious houses, Henry VIII. gave it to the mayor, commonalty and citizens of London, for a parish church, in lieu of the two churches of St. Ewen, in Newgate Market, near the north corner of Eldeness, now called Warwick Lane, and of St. Nicholas in the Shambles, on the north side of Newgate; both which churches and their parishes were then demolished, and as much of St. Sepulchre's parish as laid within Newgate, was added to this newly created parish, which was then named Christ Church. From this time it was made a vicarage in the patron age of the mayor, commonalty and citizens of London, as governors of the royal hospital of St. Bartholomew.

The old church was destroyed by the great fire in 1666, after which the small parish of St. Leonard Foster, whose church was also destroyed, and not rebuilt, was annexed to Christ Church as united parishes by the act for rebuilding the parish churches thus destroyed. St. Leonard's is a rectory in the patronage of the dean and chapter of Westminster. The present incumbent of this united vicarage and rectory is the Rev. George Preston, Jun., M.A., under master of Westminster school, who was instituted this year by the said dean and chapter, on the death of the Rev. Samuel Crowther, who was instituted by the Lord Mayor and common council as governor of St. Bartholomew, in 1800.

The present church is one of the numerous works of Sir Christopher Wren, who began to rebuild it 1687, and finished it in 1704. It is well built of stone, strong, spacious and handsome The interior is also spacious and very handsome, one hundred and fourteen feet in length, eighty one in breadth, and thirty one in height. The lofty columnar steeple, on its solid, square tower, forms one of the most striking features in the architecture of the metropolis. This parish is entitled to several excellent charities under the wills of Mrs. Margaret Danes, Lady Mary Ramsay, Sir Kenelm Digby, and others, frill accounts of which are to be found in the Reports of the Parliamentary Commissioners on the Endowed Charities of London. Christ's Hospital is also in this parish, an account of which is to be found under its proper head.

  • CHRIST'S CHURCH, Spitalfields, the Church of, is situated on the south side of Church Street, Spitalfields, directly facing the eastern end of Union Street, Bishopsgate Without. The district called Spitalfields derives its name from having been built upon the fields and grounds belonging to St. Mary's, Spital, and was formerly a hamlet in the parish of Stepney; but from the great increase of inhabitants, arising from the settlement of the persecuted French Protestants, a&#0;???fter the revocation of the edict of Nantes by Louis XIV., within its precincts, it was made, in the year 1723, a distinct parish under its present name.

This church is one of the fifty new churches ordered to be built by act of parliament, in the reign of Queen Anne. It was began in 1723, by Nicholas Hawksmoor, the favourite pupil of Sir Christopher Wren, and was finished in 1729. It is a substantial edifice, built of stone, with a lofty spire over a Doric portico, which is spoiled by the application of an arch over the two inner columns, instead of a pediment. The interior is 111 feet in length, eighty seven in breadth, and thirty eight in height.

The church is made a rectory but is not to be held in commendam; it is in the diocese of London, in the county of Middlesex, but exempt from the jurisdiction of the archdeacon; and the patronage, like that of its mother church, is in the Principal and Scholars of Brasenose College, Oxford.

  • CHRIST CHURCH, Mary-le-bone, the district Church of, is in Stafford Street, Lisson Green. It was began in 1822, and opened for divine service in May 1825. It is a substantial building, erected by His Majesty's commissioners for building new churches, from the designs of Mr. Smirke. Its front is embellished by a recessed or inverted portico of the Ionic order, above which is a square tower surmounted by a cupola and vane. It is a district rectory in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone, and the patronage, like that of its mother Church, is in the crown. The present rector is the Rev. George Chandler, D.C.L., who was instituted by the King in 1825.
  • CHRIST'S CHURCH, Surrey, the Church of, is situated on the south end of Bennett Street, Stamford Street, Blackfriars' Road, and has an open churchyard up to the footpath of the road. The parish of Christ Church, Surrey, was formerly a district belonging to the parish of St. Saviour's, Southwark, and consists principally of the Old Manor of Paris Garden, in which was situated one of the ancient playhouses of the metropolis, and here were also exhibited the bear baitings, so much in request among our ancestors.

The Church was founded, and the living instituted, by the will of Mr. John Marshall, of the borough of Southwark, dated the 21st August, 1627, wherein, among other charitable bequests to the parish of St. Saviour, was one to build and endow this church. In 1676 the first church was built on this site by the trustees, and an act of parliament was obtained to make it a distinct parish under its present name. In the year 1737 the foundation of the old church having become ruinous, a new application was made to parliament and the present church was erected at the expense of the parishioners. It is a plain substantial building consisting of a plain brick body, lighted by two tiers of windows, with a square tower and a turret. The church is a rectory, in the diocese of Winchester, and in the county and archdeaconry of Surrey. The advowson is in the patronage of the trustees of Mr. Marshall's charity, and the present rector is the Rev. J. H. Mapleton, who was instituted by the trustees in 1809. The trustees are thirteen in number, among whom are Thomas Griffiths, Esq., of Hill House, Dulwich, and William Toulmin, Esq., of Great Suffolk Street, Southwark.

  • CHRIST'S CHURCH PASSAGE, Newgate Street, turns off at No. 92, near the middle of the north side of that street, and leads to Christ's Church and Christ's Hospital.
  • CHRIST'S CHURCH SOCIETY, Newgate Street, is a charitable institution among the inhabitants of that parish, for visiting and relieving the sick poor at their own habitations, and for assisting poor married women with child bed linen.
  • CHRIST'S HOSPITAL, Newgate Street, is one of the five royal hospitals that are under the guardianship of the Corporation of London, the general management of which is described in the article Bartholomew's Hospital, to which the reader is referred.

On the site of part of the ground now occupied by this Hospital and Newgate Market, stood a small convent of Grey Friars, which at the dissolution of the religious houses by Henry VIII., was vested in the Corporation of London, at the same time that he transferred to them the Priory of St. Bartholomew. Christ's Church had been esteemed one of the most superb among the conventional churches of England, having been built by contributions of princes and nobles, among whom were Gilbert de Clare, who, according to Pennant, gave twenty beams of timber out of his forest at Tonbridge, towards its construction in the following reign they began to repair and furnish it for the reception of poor fatherless children, and it received the name of Christ's Hospital from the charter of Edward VI., in 1552, who thereby incorporated the governors of the three hospitals of Bridewell, Christ's, and St. Thomas.

  • [[Besides its first endowment and numerous subsequent benefactions, this hospital receives the benefit, by grant from the corporation, by superintending and licensing the carts of the city.

The greater part of the buildings of this hospital were destroyed at the great fire of 1666, but the active zeal and liberality of the corporation and their fellow citizens, restored it by donations, by loans, and by anticipation of its revenues, all of which obligations, says Mr. Highmore, in his Pietas Londinensis, have been long since discharged.

  • [[Charles II., on the 19th of August 1674, founded a mathematical school within its boundaries, styled the New Royal Foundation of King Charles II., to qualify forty boys for the sea. They wear appropriate badges, and their classes are examined by the elder brethren of the Trinity House. Ten of the ablest of these boys are appointed to ships, and ten others are received in their places. All the other scholars are bound apprentices at fourteen or fifteen years of age, for seven years, or if properly qualified, are sent to one of the Universities.

On St. Matthew's day, Sept. 21st, yearly, the Lord Mayor goes in state, accompanied by the president, aldermen, sheriffs and governors, and visitors admitted by tickets, who assemble in the great hall, after divine service at Christ's Church. Orations in Latin and in English are then delivered by the senior boys who are qualifying for college.

The governors also maintain a junior school or nursery at Hertford, which is also under excellent regulations.

The children are admitted by recommendation of a governor, on the order of the committee and treasurer, signed by the chief clerk. Their education consists of reading, writing, arithmetic, navigation and the Latin and Greek languages, to those intended for the university. Their dress is the same as that used in the time of Edward VI., namely, a blue cloth coat, or tunic, which reaches nearly to the foot, with yellow breeches and stockings, and a round bonnet.

The processes of education, examination, rules and regulations of the hospital, are fully and authentically explained in Highmore's Pietas Londinensis, to which the reader is referred.

The buildings are at present detached, and very irregular. Part of the ancient cloisters remain, which were repaired after the great fire in 1066. The writing school was built and endowed in 1694, by Alderman Sir John Moore, the President of the Hospital, from the designs of Sir Christoph&#0;???er Wren. The Grammar School, which is a neat yellow brick building near Little Britain, was erected hi 1793, from the designs of Mr. Lewis, then architect to the hospital. The new hall, which is used as the refectory, is a fine specimen of the pure ancient style of English architecture by Mr. Shaw, the present architect to the hospital. It is two hundred feet in length, by fifty in breadth. A fine organ and gallery is at one end, and a pulpit is fixed against the south wall, for the purpose of prayer and exhortation.

The present officers of Christ's Hospital are William Thompson, Esq., M.P. and Alderman, President; Thomas Poynder, Jun., Esq., Treasurer; and the following members of the common council as corporation Governors; Robert Slade, Esq., for Castle Baynard; Edward Colebatch, Esq., deputy, Portsoken, Mr. Charles Stuart, Tower; Mr. N. Saunders, Bridge; W. A. Beckwith, Farringdon Without; J. Trimbey, Esq., Cordwainers; Mr. R. Pigeon, Broad Street; Mr. Edward Eyton, Cornhill; Mr. R. L. Jones, Cripplegate Without; Mr. John Duddle, Bishopsgate Within; Mr. John Saunders, Candlewick, Thomas Welby, Esq., Clerk; the Rev. John Greenwood M.A., Head Classical Master; the Rev. Edward Rice, M.A., Second Classical Master; the Rev. William Trollope, M.A., Third Classical Master; the Rev. Just Henry Alt, M.A., Fourth Classical Master; the Rev. George J. Brookes, M.A., Head Mathematical Master; William Webster, B.A., Assistant ditto; George Reynolds, Writing Master; John Wells, Drawing; J. Glenn, Music; Edward Roberts, M.D., Physician; Eusebius A. Lloyd, Esq., Surgeon; Henry Fidd, Apothecary; Matthew Cotton, Receiver; Thomas Huggins, Steward; Mrs. Huggins, Matron. - Establishment at Hertford: The Rev. Charles Cotton, B.A., Classical Master; George Ludlow, Writing; Mrs. Elizabeth Thompson, Schoolmistress; Thomas Colbeck, Surgeon and Apothecary; Robert A. Steele, Steward; Mrs. Moore, Matron.

  • CHRISTIAN STREET, St. George's in the East, is the continuation of Prince's Place, New Road.
  • CHRISTOPHER'S ALLEY, Finsbury, is the first turning in Wilson Street, northward of Crown Street.
  • CHRISTOPHER ALLEY, Lambeth Street, Goodman's Fields is about four houses from Ayliffe Street.
  • [[CHRISTOPHER COURT. - 1. is the second turning on the right hand from Golden Lane. - 2. is in Angel Alley, the first turning on the left hand from Little Moorfields. - 3. is in St. Martin's-le-Grand, the third turning on the left hand from Newgate Street. - 4. is in Brick Lane, the fourth turning on the left hand from Old Street. - 5. is on the east side of Tower Hill, seven houses northward of Irongate. - 6. is in Rosemary Lane, between Darby Street and Blue Anchor Yard.
  • CHRISTOPHER ROW, Walworth, is at the north end of Union Street, East Lane, the second turning on the left hand, going from Richmond Place towards Lock's Fields.
  • CHRISTOPHER STREET, Finsbury, is the second turning in Long Alley northward of Crown Street.
  • CHRISTOPHER STREET, Hatton Garden, is the north continuation of that street, extending onwards to Back Lane.
  • CHRISTOPHER STREET, Finsbury Square, is at the north east corner of the square, and leads into Wilson Street.
  • CHRISTOPHER STREET, Bethnal Green, is the continuation of Turville Street, on the right from No. 37, Church Street. It leads to Nelson St&#0;???reet, Mount Street, and Virginia Row, at the back of Shoreditch Church.
  • CHURCHES, The various, in the Metropolis. These are all to be found under their different heads, as St. Albans, St. Alphage, &c.
  • CHURCH ALLEY, Basinghall Street, is near the middle of the west side, and leads into Aldermanbury.
  • CHURCH ALLEY, Ironmonger Lane, Cheapside, is eight houses on the right hand from Cheapside, and leads into the Old Jewry.
  • [[CHURCH COURT. - 1. is in Church Passage, St. James's, the first turning on the left hand, going from Piccadilly. - 2. is in Little Chapel Street, Westminster, three houses westward of Gardener's Lane, nearly opposite the Alms Houses. - 3. is in the Strand, at No. 446, near Charing Cross. - 4. is in Walbrook, about six houses on the right hand from the Mansion House. - 5. is in Friday Street, about three houses on the right hand from Cheapside. - 6. is in Clement's Lane, Lombard Street, about four houses on the right hand from Cannon Street. - 7. is in Lothbury, on the north side of the Bank of England, adjoining Tokenhouse Yard. - 8. is in Wapping, at the north end of Maidenhead Court from Wapping.
  • CHURCH ENTRY, Shoemaker's Row, Blackfriars, is the second turning on the left hand westward of Creed Lane.
  • CHURCH GARDENS, Wapping, is the continuation of Well Alley, going from Wapping.
  • CHURCH HILL, St. Pancras, is at the east side of the church, about the third of a mile on the right hand from Battle Bridge.
  • CHURCH HILL, Blackfriars, is the first turning on the right hand from St. Andrew's Hill, going from Earl Street.
  • [[CHURCH LANE. - 1. is in George Street, Bloomsbury, the first turning on the left hand, from Broad Street. - 2. is in the Strand, about thirty houses on the left hand, going from Charing Cross. - 3. is in Whitechapel, the continuation of Church Street to the Commercial Road. - 4. is called Back Church Lane, and is the continuation of the last into Cable Street. - 5. is in Limehouse, and extends from the west side of the church to Ropemaker's Fields. - 6. is in Newington Butts, opposite the church in the High Street.
  • CHURCHES, ADDITIONAL]], COMMISSIONERS FOR BUILDING. This parliamentary commission is appointed by authority of an act of the 58th Geo. III., c. cxlv, and have built a very great number of new churches in the metropolis, and other parts of the Kingdom. The present commissioners are, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Lord Chancellor, the Archbishop of York, Earls Harrowby and Hardwick, Viscount Sidmouth, the Bishops of London, Winchester, Litchfield, Lincoln, Chester, and Down and Connor, the Dean of Westminster, the Rev. J. Headlam, Archdeacon of Richmond; the Rev. Dr. Wordsworth: Lords Grenville, Kenyon, Stowell and Bexley, the Archdeacons of London, Middlesex, Essex, Nottingham and Derby, the Speaker of the House of Commons, the Right Hon. Sir John Nicholl, M.P., Francis Burton, Esq., Benjamin C. Stephenson, Esq., Surveyor General, and Joshua Watson Esq., Mr. George Jelf, Secretary.
  • CHURCHES AND CHAPELS, SOCIETY FOB PROMOTING THE BUILDING OF]], Great George Street, Westminster. This society aids parishes with pecuniary assistance, under certain regulations, for rebuilding or repairing the churches. The present officers are, the King, Patron; the Archbishop of Canterbury, President; the Archbishop of York, the Dukes of Beaufort, Rutland and Northumberland, and thirteen other peers of the realm, all the Bishops, the Speaker of the House of Commons, Mr Justice Park, Sir Robert Peel, Bart., and other illustrio&#0;???us Commoners, Vice Presidents; Lord Kenyon, Sir Robert Peel, Bart., Charles Hoare and Joshua Watson, Esqs., Trustees; the Rev. William J. Rodber, Secretary, and Mr. Henry Stretton, of No. 67, Lincoln's Inn Fields, Collector.
  • CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY, THE]], have their London establishment on the western side of Salisbury Square, Fleet Street, and their college near Highbury at Islington. They were established, and are supported by members and friends of the Church of England, principally for Africa and the eastern part of the globe.

Their college at Islington is a building more remarkable for strength and goodness of construction than for elegance of design. It consists of a centre and two wings, without any attempt at architectural decoration. It is, however, a plain substantial useful building, and well adapted for the purposes to which it is applied. It was designed by William Brookes, Esq., the architect of the London Institution, Finsbury Chapel, and other public buildings in or near the metropolis.

Its present officers are Lord Gambier, President; Sir Thomas Ackland, Bart., the Very Rev. Hugh Nicholas Pearson, D.D., Dean of Salisbury, and eighteen other gentlemen and clergymen, Vice Presidents; John Thornton, Esq., Treasurer; Josiah Pratt, B.D., Chairman of the Committee of Correspondence; the Rev. E. Bickerstaff, and the Rev. T. Woodroofe, M.A., Secretaries; Danderson Coates, Assistant Secretary; Messrs. Seeley, Fleet Street, and Hatchard, Piccadilly, Booksellers.

  • [[CHURCH PASSAGE. - 1. is in New Compton Street, St. Giles's the first turning both right and left from Broad Street. - 2. is called Church Passage Yard, and is at the north end of the last. - 3. is in Covent Garden, the west side of the square by the church. - 4. is in Piccadilly, at No. 200, by St. James's Church. - 5. is in Cloth Fair, West Smithfield, the first turning on the right hand from Smithfield. - 6. is in Upper Thames Street, the west side of Bennett's Inn, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from Blackfriars' Bridge.
  • [[CHURCH PLACE. - 1. is in Church Street, Whitechapel, the first turning on the left hand a few yards from the western side of the church, going towards the Commercial Road. - 2. is in Hampton Street, Newington or Walworth, the first turning on the right hand from Walworth High Street, and leads to Newington Church.
  • CHURCH ROAD, St. George's in the East, is at the east end of Lower Cornwall Street, Back Lane, extending from King David's Fort towards the Halfway House in the Commercial Road.
  • [[CHURCH ROW. - 1. is at St. Pancras, near the north end of Pancras Place, about one third of a mile on the right hand from King's Cross, Battle Bridge. - 2. is in St. Luke's, three houses on the right hand in Wenlock Street, going from Ironmonger Row, on the east side of the church in Old Street. - 3. is in Church Street, Bethnal Green, about half a mile on the right hand from Shoreditch, leading to Hare Street. - 4. is in Aldgate High Street, a few yards on the left hand from Leadenhall Street, leading round the church from the south side to Houndsditch. - 5. is in Fenchurch Street, a few houses eastward of Mark Lane, leading by the East India warehouses to Crutched Friars. - 6. is in Stepney Churchyard, about six houses at the north east corner of the churchyard. There are a few houses on the west side of the churchyard from Spring Garden Place towards the green, also called by the same name. - 7. is at Limehouse, the continuation of Church Lane from Ropemakers' Fields to the Commercial Road on the west side the church. - 8. is at Newington, in Surrey, and extends from the church to Kennington Lane, on the west side of the road, about one fifth of a &#0;???mile on the right hand from the Elephant and Castle. - 9. is in Horselydown, on the east side of St. John's Church, and extends from Fair Street to Charles Street. - 10. is in Church Street, Whitechapel.
  • CHURCH STAIRS, Rotherhithe, is nearly opposite the east end of the church, about one mile and a half eastward of London Bridge.
  • CHURCH STREET, St. Giles's, is the second turning on the right hand in Bainbridge Street, about six houses from Oxford Street, and leading into Church Lane and Dyot Street.
  • CHURCH STREET, Dean Street, Soho, is parallel to, and between Compton Street and King Street; it extends from the church to Moor Street, and is continued by Monmouth Street to Broad Street, Bloomsbury.
  • CHURCH STREET, Paddington, is about three quarters of a mile on the left hand from Connaught Terrace, and extends from the Edgeware Road to Paddington Green.
  • CHURCH STREET, Southwark, is nearly half a mile on the left hand from London Bridge, extending from St. George's Church to White Street on the left hand, and to Kent Street on the left.
  • CHURCH STREET, Millbank Street, Westminster, is on the right hand, nearly a quarter of a mile southward of the Abbey; it leads to St. John's Church.
  • CHURCH STREET, Bethnal Green, commences in Shoreditch, nearly opposite to Holywell Lane, it extends to the Turnpike, Bethnal Green Road.
  • CHURCH STREET, Mile End New Town, is nearly parallel to part of the north side of Whitechapel Road, and extends from Baker's Row to High Street; it is continued by Well Street and Montague Street into Brick Lane.
  • CHURCH STREET, Spitalfields, is the fifth turning on the left hand from Whitechapel, in Brick Lane, and is continued by Paternoster Row and Union Street into Bishopsgate Without.
  • CHURCH STREET, Minories, is the first turning on the left hand from Aldgate, and leads into Haydon Square.
  • CHURCH STREET, Whitechapel, is the first turning westward of the church, extending to Goodman's Street, and is continued by Church Lane and Commercial Road towards Limehouse.
  • CHURCH STREET, Wapping, is on the west side of the church, and on the eastern side of the London Docks; it extends to Greenbank.
  • CHURCH STREET, Lambeth, is opposite the Stags, about three quarters of a mile on the right hand from Westminster Bridge, extending from Pratt Street to the church.
  • CHURCH STREET, Blackfriars' Road, is the second turning on the left hand, about the sixth of a mile from Blackfriars' Bridge, and nearly opposite Christ Church.
  • CHURCH STREET, St. Saviour's, Southwark,is the second turning on the right hand in York Street, going from High Street, Southwark. It is near London Bridge, and leads towards the Thames.
  • CHURCH STREET, Horselydown, is on the south side of St. John's Church, near the bottom of Tooley Street, and extends from Artillery Lane to Russell Street, Bermondsey.
  • CHURCH STREET, Rotherhithe, is on the south side of the church and leads into the Lower Road to Deptford.
  • CHURCH STREET, Walworth or Newington, is the first turning parallel to the Walworth High Street or Road westward, and extends from Amelia Street to Manor Place, about half a mile on the right hand from the Elephant and Castle.
  • CHURCH TERRACE, St. Pancras, is at the end of Church Row, by the old church, on the High Road between Somers Town and Camden Town.
  • CHURCH WAY, Somers Town, is a path that extends from Charlton Street to the fields, now converting into streets, near Clarendon Square or the Polygon.
  • CHURCH YARD ALLEY, Farringdon Street, is the first turning on the right in Harp Alley, going from Farringdon Street into Shoe Lane. It is named from its contiguity to the lower churchyard of St. Bride's parish.
  • CHURCH YARD COURT, Temple, is the first turning on the left hand from Fleet Street, opposite Chancery Lane by Temple Bar.
  • CHURCH YARD ALLEY, Upper Thames Street, is about four houses on the left hand from London Bridge.
  • CHURCH YARD ROW, Newington, Surrey, is on the south side of the churchyard, and the first turning on the right hand from the church towards Kennington.
  • [[CHYMISTER ALLEY. - [see Chemister's Alley.
  • CINNAMON STREET, Wapping, is the north turning parallel to part of Wapping Street; it extends from New Market Street or Old Gravel Lane to Prussian Island.
  • CIRCUS, THE]], Minories, is about three houses on the left hand from Tower Hill.
  • CIRCUS STREET, Mary-le-bone, is the first turning on the right hand in Cumberland Place, New Road, eastward of the turnpike by the Yorkshire Stingo; it extends into York Street.
  • CIRENCESTER PLACE, Fitzroy Square, is the continuation northward of Great Titchfield Street, Oxford Market.
  • CITY BARGE HOUSE, Lambeth, is situated in Bishop's Walk, nearly a quarter of a mile above Westminster Bridge.
  • CITY CHAMBERS, NEW]], THE]], Bishopsgate Street, are by the London Tavern, three houses on the left hand from Cornhill.
  • CITY CHAMBERS, OLD]], THE]], Bishopsgate Street Within, are near to the preceding.
  • CITY DISPENSARY, THE]], is held at No. 76, Queen Street, Cheapside; was established in 1788, and opened on the 1st of January, 1789, in Grocers Hall Court, Poultry. This charity is intended for the relief of the diseased poor, in all cases requiring medical and surgical assistance, and for inoculation. It is open every day for the admission of patients on the recommendation of a governor, where they have advice and medicine; and those who are not able to attend, are visited at their own habitations. Medical electricity and warm and cold baths are provided for such cases as the medical officers think necessary.

The business of this charity is managed by a committee of twenty-four governors, elected annually; and the present officers, who are also members of such committee, ex officio are. The King, Patron; H.R.H. the Prince Leopold, Vice Patron; the Lord Mayor for the time being, President; Robert Williams, Esq., M.P., Richard Clark, Esq., Chamberlain, Sir Richard Carr Glynn, Bart., Aldermen Atkins, M.P., Wood, M.P., Thorpe, and twelve other eminent citizens, Vice Presidents; David Uwins, M.D., Physician; Thomas Crokatt, Esq., Deputy of Bread Street Ward, Treasurer; William Kingdon, Esq., Surgeon; John C. Taunton, Esq., Assistant Surgeon; Mr. W. Honeywood, Apothecary; Mr. John Nokes, Secretary; Mr. John Cooper, of No. 61, Winyatt Street, Clerkenwell, Collector.

  • CITY DISPENSARY, THE]], WESTERN]], is a charitable institution of a similar nature to the preceding, extending to the localities of the&#0;??? Old Change and Lambeth Hill to the eastward; the Temple, Temple Bar, and Chancery Lane, westward; Holborn, Skinner Street, and Newgate Street, northward; and to the Thames on the southward, wherein all patients are attended when necessary at their own homes; and are received gratuitously on a letter from a governor by the medical officers at their own houses. It was established on the 1st of January 1830, for supplying the poor with medical advice, assistance and medicines, in cases of sickness.

The business of this excellent charity is conducted by and under the patronage of the Bishop of London, Patron; the Lord Mayor for the time being. President; the Bishop of Llandaff, Dean of St. Paul's, Sir Charles Price, Bart., A. Spottiswoode, Esq., M.P., the Rev. Dr. Allen, Vicar of St. Bride's, Alderman Copeland, T. N. Longman, Esq., and ten other gentlemen, Vice Presidents; Frederick Sparrow, Esq., Treasurer; a committee of twenty-one gentlemen resident in the district; Septimus Wray, Esq., No. 9, Salisbury Square, D. H. Walne, Esq., and J. Manden, Esq., Surgeons, &c, for the district westward of Farringdon Street; P. Huriock, Esq., St. Paul's Churchyard, B. Goss, Esq., Newgate Street, and Richard Gilpin, Esq., of Earl Street, Blackfriars, eastward of Farringdon Street; Dr. Clutterbuck, Consulting Physician; Dr. Ramsbottom, Consulting Accoucheur; and Frederick Tyrrel, Esq., Consulting Surgeon; Mr. Nason, Fleet Street, Mr. Lowden, Fleet Street, and Messrs. Drew and Co., No. 2, Skinner Street, Druggists; Joseph Smith, Esq., of Dorset Street, Vestry Clerk of St. Bride's, Honorary Secretary; and three appointed Midwives for deserving cases.

  • CITY GARDENS, City Road, are an assemblage of cottages and gardens on the north side of the road behind Anderson's Buildings, near the Regent's Canal, about three quarters of a mile on the right hand from Finsbury Square.
  • CITY GARDEN ROW, City Gardens, is a row of houses that extends from the City Road near the Canal, to the aforesaid Gardens.
  • CITY GREEN YARD, Whitecross Street, is nearly opposite the new city prison, and is a sort of pound, where Horses or carts found without drivers are taken.
  • [[CITY LAND COAL METER'S OFFICE. - The principal office is at the coal market in Lower Thames Street, opposite Billingsgate, there is another in Great Timber Street, Brooke's Wharf, Upper Thames Street, and another at No. 21, Garlick Hill. - [see Coal Meters' Land Office]
  • CITY OF LONDON TAVERN, Bishopsgate Street, is about twelve houses on the right hand from Leadenhall Street, and opposite Threadneedle Street.
  • CITY OF LONDON TRUSS SOCIETY, FOR THE RELIEF OF THE RUPTURED POOR THROUGHOUT THE KINGDOM]], is held at No. 76, Queen Street, Cheapside. This charity was instituted in 1807, and was held at the City Dispensary in Grocers' Hall Court, but was removed with that institution to its present site. It is managed by a committee of governors, who meet on the second Wednesday in the months of January, April, July, and October; and is under the patronage of the King, the Duke of Cambridge, and Prince Leopold. John Atkins, Esq., M.P. and Alderman, President; the Earls of Digby, Egremont and Grosvenor, Lord Gambier, and thirty other noblemen and gentlemen of all parts of the Kingdom, Vice Presidents; Samuel Cartwright, Esq., Treasurer; John C. Taunton, Esq., Surgeon; Thomas Eglinton, No. 44, St. John's Street Road, Secretary.
  • CITY OF LONDON LYING-IN HOSPITAL, THE]], City Road, for the reception and delivery of poor Pregnant Married Women, is situated, rather more than a quarter of a mile on the left hand from Finsbury Square, at the corner of Old Street, and the eastern end of St. Luke'&#0;???s Hospital.

This charity was instituted in 1750, by a few gentlemen of the City, who were desirous of promoting so benevolent an object, and they commenced their work of charity, in hired apartments, at London House, Aldersgate Street, avoiding, by such means, exhausting the whole of their funds on an expensive building. In the following year the committee removed their establishment to Shaftesbury House, nearly opposite, and in 1769, their funds had so increased, that they took a lease for ninety nine years of the governors of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, of the site they now occupy, and erected the present handsome and commodious edifice, from the designs, and under the superintendence of Robert Milne, Esq., the architect of Blackfriars' Bridge. The first stone was laid by Barlow Trecothick, Esq., Lord Mayor of London and President of the Hospital, on the 10th of October 1770. The new hospital was opened on the 4th of April 1773, by divine service, and a sermon in the chapel, by the Rev. Joseph Cookson, the chaplain. A very interesting and detailed account of this institution is given in Mr. Highmore's Pietas Londinensis, that gentleman being at that time secretary, but it is too long for the pages of this work, as every other similar charity would require equal extension. The reader who requires further information is therefore referred to that work.

The present officers are, the Lord Mayor, Patron; Sir John Perring, Bart., President; Sir Richard Carr Glynn, Bait., Sir James Shaw, Bart., Sir Charles Flower, Bart., William Mellish, Esq., and seven other eminent Citizens, Vice Presidents; John Capel, Esq., Treasurer; William Howard, Esq., Chairman of the Committee of Management; the Rev. James Carver, M.A., Chaplain; Halliley Lidderdale, M.D. Physician; J. T. Conquest, M.D., Physician Accoucheur; William Lucas, Esq., Surgeon; Mr. James Clift, No. 23, Red Lion Square, Secretary; Mrs. C. Tuson, Matron and Midwife; Mary Widgon, Assistant Ditto.

  • CITY OF LONDON LYING-IN INSTITUTION, THE]], for providing poor Married Women with Midwives and Medicine at their own habitations. The office of this charity is in Great Swan Alley, Coleman Street, and applies to cases that many of the Lying-in Hospitals omit. It provides well instructed women, of good character, to attend in all ordinary cases. Over them a vigilant eye is kept, and a physician, accoucheur, and proper medical officers are attached to the institution, who give advice and assistance at any hour of the day or night, in cases of difficulty or danger. The limits prescribed to the midwives, beyond which they are not allowed to go, are described by a line drawn from the Tower, along Thames Street to Temple Bar, Chancery Lane, Holborn, Smithfield, St. John's Street to Wilderness Row, along Old Street Road to Hoxton Town, Shoreditch Church to Bishopsgate Church, down Houndsditch and the Minories to the Tower. Its present officers are, Sir Thomas Baring, Bart., President; seven Vice Presidents; John Whitmore, Esq., Treasurer; J. T. Conquest, M.D., Physician Accoucheur; B. Traven, Esq., Consulting Surgeon; Henry Pellatt, Esq., Ironmongers' Hall, Secretary; a Committee of fourteen Subscribers; James Brown, Esq., Solicitor.
  • CITY OF LONDON GENERAL BENEVOLENT INSTITUTION, THE]], for administering temporary aid to the Poor within five miles of the Royal Exchange. The office of this charity is at No. 37, Old Jewry, It was instituted by some benevolent individuals in 1830. J. Hulbert, Esq., Treasurer; and Mr. Tucker, No. 22, Addle Street, Secretary.
  • CITY OF LONDON SCHOOL OF INSTRUCTION AND INDUSTRY, THE]], is situated in Mitre Street, Aldgate. This school was originally proposed by the Rev. Dr. Povah, the rector of St. James', Duke's Place, and some of his benevolent parishioners, inhabitants of that district, in 1806. It affords p&#0;???rotection to seventy children, sixty of whom, namely, thirty boys and thirty girls are admitted on the foundation, and are annually clothed, educated and taught to make their own clothes, and other branches of useful industry. My readers are referred for further information to another work of Mr. Highmore's, called Philanthropia Metropolitana, a sort of continuation of his Pietas, as it contains accounts of charities established since the publication of his other work.

This charity is managed by two committees, one of ladies for the female department, and the other, of the governors, for the male department, and affairs generally. Its present officers are the King, who was its original patron when Duke of Clarence, Patron; the Sheriffs of London, the Recorder and fourteen other benevolent citizens, Vice Presidents; the Rev. Richard Povah, D.C.L., Founder and Visitor; James Schooling, Esq., Treasurer; eight Auditors; Thomas Saunders, Esq., Queen Street Place, Honorary Secretary; Mr. John Myles, Schoolmaster, and Mrs. Elizabeth Myles, Schoolmistress.

  • CITY KITCHEN, THE]], New Street, Blackfriars, is a charitable institution for the relief of the poor of the City of London, and parts adjacent. It was established in the year 1700. - [see Association for the relief of the Poor of the City, &c.]
  • CITY ROAD, Finsbury Square, is a wide and handsome thoroughfare, extending from the north west corner of the square to the Angel, at Islington. It is about a mile and a quarter in length, and communicates with the New Road, Pentonville, Islington, the New North Road, St. John Street Road, and other great thoroughfares.
  • CITY SOLICITOR'S OFFICE, is in Guildhall Yard, the last door on the left hand side before coming to Guildhall. It is on the one-pair story: the present Solicitor is W. L. Newman, Esq.
  • CITY REMEMBRANCER'S OFFICE, is on the two-pair story of the same building. The present Remembrancer is Timothy Tyrrel, Esq.; Deputy Remembrancer, Edward Tyrrell, Esq.
  • CITY COMPTROLLER'S OFFICE, is at the first door on the left hand, under the porch, in Guildhall. The present Comptroller is Joseph Bushman, Esq.; Deputy Comptroller, Francis Bligh Hookey, Esq.
  • [[CITY OF LONDON GENERAL PENSION SOCIETY. The office of this society is at No. 8, Ironmonger Lane, Cheapside. It was founded in 1818, for the benevolent purpose of allowing permanent pensions to decayed artisans, mechanics and their widows, who are resident within ten miles of the metropolis. The pensions are \\'a313. a year, or five shillings a week to the men, and \\'a37. 16s. a year, or three shillings a week to the women. The directors meet on the first Wednesday in every month for general purposes, and quarterly on the first Wednesday in January, April, July and October. The present officers are their R.H. the Duke of Sussex and Prince Leopold, Patrons; the Lord Mayor for the time being, President; the Dukes of Bedford, Norfolk and St. Albans, the Marquesses of Lansdowne, Clanricarde, many of the aldermen, Dr. Birkbeck and several other leading characters of the city. Vice Presidents; Alderman Sir Peter Laurie, Treasurer; the Rev. W. E. L. Faulkner, Chaplain; and Daniel Richardson, Esq., Secretary.
  • CITY STONE YARD, Worship Street, is the first turning on the left, hand from Paul Street. It is the receptacle of the old building materials belonging to the corporation under the management of William Mountague, Esq., the clerk of the city's works, who is the receiver of old materials. &#0;???
  • CITY TERRACE, City Road, forms part of the north side of that road, and is nearly half a mile on the right hand from Finsbury Square, opposite Fountain Place.
  • CLARE COURT, Clare Market, turns off at No. 104, Drury Lane, and leads into White Horse Yard and Blackmore Street.
  • CLARE HALL ROW, Stepney Green, is on the west side, by the Charity School, opposite the Mulberry Tree, about one third of a mile on the right from Mile End.
  • CLARE MARKET, Lincoln's Inn Fields, is at the south west corner, and near the north end of Newcastle Street going from the Strand. It derives its name from John, Earl of Clare, by whom it was built and opened in 1656.
  • CLARE STREET, Clare Market, is on the west side of the market, and extends into Stanhope Street, and is continued by Blackmore Street into Drury Lane.
  • CLAREMONT PLACE, named after Claremont near Esher, the residence of the late much lamented Princess Charlotte of Wales. - 1. is in the City Road, near the Angel at Islington. - 2. is in the Brixton Road, on the eastern side just beyond Kennington Common. - 3. is in the Old Kent Road.
  • CLAREMONT SQUARE, Pentonville, turns off at No. 27, Claremont Terrace, New Road.
  • CLAREMONT STREET, Pentonville, is a short distance on the right hand in the New Road, beyond the Angel.
  • CLAREMONT CHAPEL, is a dissenting place of worship in the New Road, near the above.
  • CLAREMONT STREET, Hackney Road, is near Durham Street, on the right hand, going from Shoreditch Church, to Cambridge Heath.
  • CLARENCE GARDENS, Rotherhithe, are in Clarence Street, a short distance on the right hand below the church.
  • CLARENCE MARKET, Regent's Park, is a new market on the east side of the Regent's Park, northward of Osnaburgh Street, New Road, which leads into it, crossing York Square, and is continued northward by Clarence Street into Cumberland Market.
  • CLARENCE PASSAGE, St. Pancras, is by the Duke of Clarence public house, on the north side of the Small Pox Hospital
  • [[CLARENCE PLACE. - 1. is in Pentonville, part of the south side of the New Road, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from the Angel, Islington. - 2. is in the Hackney Road, part of the east side of the High Road, extending from Crabtree Row to the Crescent, opposite Union Street, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from Shoreditch Church. - 3. is in Southwark, turning out of the Borough Road, St. George's Fields; it is a part of the south side, commencing near the King's Bench Prison on the left hand, and leading towards the Obelisk.
  • CLARENCE STREET, Rotherhithe, is about the sixth of a mile on the right hand, below the church, turning off at No. 302, Rotherhithe Street.
  • CLARENCE TERRACE, Regent's Park, is a picturesque row of houses, on the western side of the park, and named in honour of King William IV., when Duke of Clarence and Lord High Admiral of England. They are from the designs of Decimus Burton, Esq., and consist of a centre and two wings, of the Corinthian order, connected by two colonnades of the Ionic order. It is the smallest terrace in this park, but it is one of the most elegant in design, and pure in taste.
  • [[C&#0;???LARENDON SQUARE]], Somers Town, the square which encloses the Polygon, at the west end of Phoenix Street, from the Crescent, or second on the left along Chalton Street, from the New Road.
  • CLARENDON STREET, Somers Town, the west continuation of the south side of the square.
  • CLARGES STREET, Piccadilly, is about half a mile on the right hand from the Haymarket, between Bolton Street and Half Moon Street, and leads into Curzon Street, May Fair.
  • CLARK'S BUILDINGS, Snow Hill, is the first turning on the west from the Saracens Head Inn, at No. 52, Skinner Street.
  • [[CLARK'S COURT. - 1. is Hatton Wall, the first turning on the left hand in Vine Street, going from Hatton Wall. - 2. is in Jacob Street, Dock Head, the second turning on the right hand from Mill Street, near the bridge. - 3. is in Little Turnstile, Holborn. - 4. is at No. 58, Bishopsgate Street Within.
  • CLARK'S MEWS, Beaumont Street, Mary-le-bone, turns off at No. 2, three houses from Weymouth Street.
  • CLARK'S ORCHARD, Rotherhithe, is between Queen Street and Princes Street, and leads to the eastern end of Paradise Street and the Lower Road to Deptford.
  • CLARK STREET, Clerkenwell, is the first turning on the west, and parallel to Goswell Street; it extends from Allen Street into Little Sutton Street.
  • CLARK'S TERRACE, St. George's in the East is part of the east side of Cannon Street Road, and extends from the turnpike by Cannon Street to the chapel.
  • CLAY STREET, Mary-le-bone, is the second turning on the left hand in Durweston Street, going from Baker Street; it extends into Dorset Street.
  • CLAYLAND'S PLACE, Clapham Road, is on the right hand side going from Kennington common, between the new church and Dorset Place North.
  • CLAYTON PLACE, Kennington, forms a part of the west side of the main road, near the two mile stone from Cornhill; it extends from Mansion House Row to White Hart Row.
  • CLAYTON STREET, Kennington, is the second turning on the left hand from the Horns Tavern, going towards Kennington Cross; it leads on to the Oval.
  • CLAYTON STREET, LITTLE]], Kennington, is the first turning on the right hand in the last named Street, going from Kennington Green towards the Oval.
  • CLEAVER COURT, Goodman's Fields, is about the middle of the north side of Great Ayliffe Street.
  • CLEAVER'S RENTS, Goodman's Fields, are the first turning on the left hand in Great Ayliffe Street, going from Somerset Street, Whitechapel.
  • CLEAVER STREET, Kennington, is the continuation of the south side of Princes Square, and leads to Kennington Cross, behind the White Hart.
  • St. CLEMENT'S DANES, Strand, the Church of, is the first church westward of Temple Bar; it stands nearly in the middle of the street. It is supposed by most historians that it derives its name from having been dedicated in very ancient times to St. Clement, a disciple of St. Peter the Apostle, and the fourth Pope of Rome, who is said in Papal chronology to have been created Pope in the year of Christ 91, and the died about the year 100. Baker in his chronicles says it received the epithet \\ldblquote Danes\\rdblquote from having been the burial place of Harold the Dane.&#0;??? William of Malmsbury mentions a great conquest over the Danes near this spot, where many were slain in a place since called Clement the Danes; but Fleetwood, the antiquary, who was Recorder of London in the reign of Elizabeth, reported to the Lord Treasurer Burleigh, who resided in this parish, that when most of the Danes were driven out of this Kingdom, those few that remained were permitted to settle and to marry English wives, and had the district between Thorney Isle, now called Westminster, and Caer Lud, Ludgate, assigned to them, where they built a church that was afterwards consecrated and called after them and the before mentioned saint - Ecclesia Clementis Danorum.

The old church was taken down in 1680, and the body of the present church was rebuilt to the old tower by Sir Christopher Wren, in 1682. By an inscription on a slab of white marble in the north aisle it appears that Sir Christopher gave his valuable services, when he stood alone in this country as an architect, to the parish gratuitously. Generosity and liberality are among the most prominent features of that great man's character.

In the year 1719, when Wren was in his ninetieth year, when Steele published his beautiful and appropriate apologue of Nestor, concerning the ungrateful neglect of Wren; Gibbs, no unworthy follower, added the present lofty, picturesque and handsome tower and steeple to this church.

The Church is a very handsome structure, built entirely of solid stone, lighted by two stories of windows, and has a commodious and well arranged interior, ninety six feet in length, sixty three in breadth and forty eight in height. It is a rectory, in the City of Westminster, in the diocese of London and in the county and archdeaconry of Middlesex. The patronage was anciently in the Knights Templars; but after passing through several hands, it came into the family of the Earls of Exeter, with whom it remained till recently. Gilbert's Clerical Guide, which is generally received as good authority, gives the patronage to \\ldblquote Lord St. Helens', &c.\\rdblquote but does not mention whom he means by the \\ldblquote &c.\\rdblquote The present rector is the Rev. William Gurney, who is advantageously known to the public by valuable editions of the Old and New Testaments, the Book of Common Prayer and other works, and to his parish by his attention to all his clerical and parochial duties. He was instituted by Lord St. Helens, in 1827.

  • St. CLEMENT'S EASTCHEAP, the Church of, is situated on the east side of St. Clement's Lane, which forms the western extremity of Eastcheap. This church is dedicated to the same saint and pope as the last, and derives its addition from its situation. The date of its foundation is at present unknown, but William de Southlee appears to have been its rector prior to 1309, and before the suppression of religious houses, it was in the gift of the abbot and brethren of the convent of St. Peter, Westminster. Queen Mary, however, in the first year of her reign, gave the advowson of this church to the Bishop of London and his successors in that see for ever, with whom it still remains, as hereafter mentioned.

The ancient church was burned down in 1666, and the present erected by Sir Christopher Wren in 1686. It is a neat, plain and appropriate but unpretending building, of the Composite order, with, a square tower and a balustrade. The interior is well arranged and neatly pewed, is sixty four feet in length, forty feet in breadth, and thirty four in height. It is a rectory, and the living was considerably augmented by having the neighbouring parish of St. Martin Orgar united to it by an act of parliament, after the fire of London.

The parish church of St. Martin Orgar stood on the east side of St. Martin's Lane, Cannon Street, and was so designated fr&#0;???om its dedication to St. Martin, and from one Ordgarus, who is generally supposed to have been the founder. This church was also a rectory, the patronage of which was granted about the year 1181 by Ordgarus, with the consent of his wife and sons, to the Bean and Chapter of St. Paul's, in whom, except as hereafter mentioned, it still remains. Since the union of this parish with that of St. Clements, the living is presented alternately by the Bishop of London and the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's. The present rector of these united parishes is the Rev. William Johnson, who was instituted by the Bishop of London in 1820. The next presentation is, of course, with the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's.

  • [[CLEMENT'S COURT. - 1. is in Carey Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, about a furlong on the left hand from Chancery Lane. - 2. is in Milk Street, Cheapside, the second turning on the left hand from Cheapside, and leads to Wood Street. - 3. is in Liverpool Road, formerly called the Back Road, Islington.
  • CLEMENT'S INN, Strand. The entrance to this Inn is in Pickett Street, opposite the north side of St. Clement's Church, a few houses on the right hand from Temple Bar, and leads to New Inn. It is an Inn of Chancery, belonging to the Inner Temple, and named from its contiguity to St. Clement's.

The antiquity of this Inn is not at present known, but it is mentioned in a book of entries, dated in the nineteenth year of Edward IV. Shakspeare, however, if he could be relied on as a chronologist, makes it of much older date, for Justice Shallow, in the second part of Henry IV. speaks two or three times of his freaks, and of his acting in the shows, when he was a member of this Inn, and boasts, \\ldblquote I was once of Clement's Inn, where, I think, they will talk of Mad Shallow yet.\\rdblquote In the second year of Henry VII., Sir John Cantelow demised this Inn to John and William Elliott, in trust for the students; and in 1538, it descended to Sir William Holies, then Lord Mayor, and from him to the Earl of Clare, in whose family it still remains.

  • CLEMENT'S INN PASSAGE, Clement's Inn, is the continuation of the north east side of the Inn, and leads into Houghton Street and Clare Market.
  • CLEMENT'S LANE, Strand, is a few houses on the right hand in Pickett Street going from Temple Bar, facing the north side of St. Clement's Church, and leads into Clare Market.
  • CLEMENT'S LANE, Lombard Street, is the first turning on the left hand from Gracechurch Street, and leads into Cannon Street.
  • CLERICAL, MEDICAL AND GENERAL LIFE INSURANCE SOCIETY]], have their office at No. 4, Southampton Street, Bloomsbury Square. The object of this institution is to afford to all classes of persons, whether in the church, the medical profession, the law, the army, the navy or in any other station of life, the utmost advantage that can be derived from the system of Life Assurance. The business of this society is conducted by and under the management of his Grace the Duke of Gordon, G.C.B., President; thirteen Vice Presidents; sixteen Directors\\\} of whom George Pinckard, M.D., is Chairman; seven Trustees; four Auditors; Messrs. Dixon, Son, and Brooks, Bankers; John Burder, and William Gilmore Bolton, Esqrs., Solicitors, and Joseph Pinckard, Esq., Resident Secretary and Actuary.
  • [[CLERK OF THE DOCQUETS' OFFICE (K.B), is in the King's Bench Office, King's Bench Walk, Temple.
  • [[CLERK OF THE DOCQUETS' OFFICE (C.P.), is at the Prothonotaries Office, Tanfield Court, Temple.
  • [[CLERK OF THE ESSOIGNS' OFFICE (C.P.), is in Elm Court, Temple. The hours from 11 till 2 and from 4 till 8 in term, and 4 till 6 in vacation.
  • [[CLERK OF THE PAPERS' OFFICE (K.B.), 4, Symond's Inn. Hours from 10 till 2, and 6 till 8; and near K. B. prison, the hours from 10 till 2, and from 6 till 9.
  • [[CLERK OF THE PAPERS' OFFICE (C.P.), is at the Fleet Prison. Hours from 10 till 3, and from 6 till 9 in term.
  • CLERK OF THE RULES' OFFICE, (K.B.), is at No. 6, Symond's Inn. Hours from 10 till 2 and from 6 till 9; in vacation, from 10 till 2.
  • CLERK OF THE CITY WORKS' OFFICE, is in Guildhall, down the steps on the right hand side of those that go up to the Chamberlain's Office and the Council Chambers.
  • CLERKS' HALL, Wood Street, Cheapside, is at the corner of Silver Street, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from Cheapside. - [see Parish Clerks' Hall]
  • CLERKENWELL, a large district or parish, situated to the north east of High Holborn. It derives its name from a spring on the western side of the green, called Clerks' or Clerken (the ancient plural of clerk) well, from the parish clerks of the City of London meeting there annually to exhibit dramatic representations, founded on scriptural subjects. The water of this well was suffered to run to waste for many years, but at length the parishioners caused it to be walled in, and a pump to be erected in it for the use of the neighbouring inhabitants, on the front of which is an inscription relating to its history. It stands in Ray Street, nearly opposite Mutton Hill.
  • [[CLERKENWELL CHURCH [see St. James's, Clerkenwell, the Church of]
  • CLERKENWELL CLOSE, Clerkenwell, is on the west side the church, it is continued by Bridewell Walk and Rosamond Street into Spa Fields, and leads towards Islington.
  • CLERKENWELL GREEN, Clerkenwell, is the large open space on the south side of the church, and in front of the Sessions' House, about a quarter of a mile northward of Smithfield.
  • CLERKENWELL WORKHOUSE, Coppice Row, is about a furlong on the left hand from the Sessions House or Green, towards Pentonville.
  • CLEVELAND COURT, St. James's Pala&#0;???ce, is about eight houses on the left hand from St. James's Street.
  • CLEVELAND MEWS, Cleveland Street, Fitzroy Square, are at No. 16, and lead into Russell Mews and Howland Street.
  • CLEVELAND ROW, St. James's, is the west continuation of Pall Mall, facing the Palace, and extending from St. James's Street to the Stable Yard in the Palace.
  • CLEVELAND STREET, St. James's, is at the west end of Cleveland Row; two of its sides are occupied by the splendid mansion, picture galleries and offices of the Marquess of Stafford.
  • CLEVELAND STREET, Fitzroy Square, is on the west side of the square and extends from Foley Street to Carburton Street. It is continued by Buckingham Place to the New Road.
  • CLEVELAND YARD, King Street, St. James's, is the first turning on the left hand from St. James's Square.
  • CLIFFORD'S INN, Fleet Street, is by the side of St. Dunstan's Church, and leads into Fetter Lane on the right hand, and to Serjeant's Inn and Chancery Lane on the left.
  • CLIFFORD ROW, Chelsea, is the second turning on the left hand in Queen Street, going towards Pimlico. It is nearly opposite Ranelagh Walk, and leads towards Belgrave Square.
  • [[CLIFFORD STREET. - 1. is in New Bond Street, the second turning on the right hand going from Piccadilly. - 2. is in the Blackfriars' Road. - 3. is in Battersea Fields. - 4. is in Waterloo Street, Walworth Common.
  • [[CLIFTON PLACE. - 1. is in Finsbury, and turns off at No. 8, New North Street. - 2. is in the Hackney Road, near the Canal Bridge, Cambridge Heath.
  • CLIFTON STREET, Finsbury, is the first turning in Worship Street, and parallel eastward to Wilson Street, Worship Square.
  • CLINK STREET, Southwark, is parallel to the Thames, on the north side of St. Saviour's Church; it extends from St. Mary Overy's Dock to Bank End, and is continued by Bank Side and Willow Street to Blackfriars' Bridge.
  • CLINK LIBERTY COURT, THE]], Southwark, is an ancient court of record, held on the Bankside in Southwark, by the steward of the Bishop of Winchester; before whom are tried pleas of debt, damage and trespass. There is also a court leet, in which business peculiar to that court is managed.
  • CLIPSTONE STREET, Mary-le-bone, is about the third of a mile on the right hand in Great Portland Street, going from Oxford Street along John Street. It leads into Cleveland Street, opposite London Street, Fitzroy Square.
  • CLOAK LANE, Queen Street, Cheapside, is the second turning on the left hand from Cheapside. It probably derives its name from Cloaca, a sewer, which anciently ran along it from Queen Street into the Walbrook.
  • CLOISTERS, THE GREAT]], Westminster, are on the south side of the Abbey, near the south east corner of Dean's Yard.
  • CLOISTERS, THE LITTLE]], are in Dean's Yard, a few yards southward of the preceding. &#0;???
  • CLOISTERS, THE]], St. Bartholomew's Hospital, are at the south corner, by No. 19, Giltspur Street, West Smithfield, and lead into Little Britain.
  • CLOISTERS, THE LITTLE]], nearly adjoin the above, and are entered at No. 44, Smithfield.
  • CLOTH FAIR, West Smithfield, is on the east side of the market by Long Lane, and extends into King Street. It is continued by Middle Street to No. 126, Aldersgate Street. It derives its name from a grant of Henry II. to the Priory of St. Bartholomew, of the privilege of a fair to be kept annually at Bartholomew tide, to which the clothiers of England and the drapers of London repaired. Their booths were within the ancient churchyard on this spot, which still retains its name, and has many respectable woollen drapers' shops.
  • CLOTHES' EXCHANGE, Rosemary Lane, is a few doors on the right hand eastward of Queen Street.
  • CLOTHWORKERS' HALL, Mincing Lane, is the first building on the left hand from No. 42, Fenchurch Street. The hall is a spacious room, embellished with carved wainscot, and figures of King James I. and Charles I., and a handsome window of stained glass.

The Company of Cloth workers was originally incorporated by letters patent of Edward IV. in the year 1482, which were confirmed by Henry VIII. in 1628. They were re-incorporated by Queen Elizabeth, by the name of the \\ldblquote Master, Wardens and Commonalty of Freemen of the Art and Mystery of Cloth workers of the City of London.\\rdblquote This last charter was confirmed by Charles I. in 1634. This company is the last of the twelve chief companies, and has been at all times in such repute as to be left trustees for numerous and munificent bequests. Among which are the Countess of Kent's alms houses, Sir John Robinson's gifts, Heath's alms houses and charity for clothing, charities for artizan clothworkers, to blind persons generally, Frances West's charity for apprentices, for blind persons of the city, and a distinct charity of the same lady to blind persons of Reading, Newbury, Twickenham and London; several exhibitions in the two universities, and several other munificent charities, which are fully detailed in the Parliamentary reports on the endowed charities of London.

  • CLOUDESLEY SQUARE, Islington, is a small new square on the left hand side of the Liverpool Road, formerly the Back Road.
  • CLUB ROW, Bethnal Green, is at No. 171 in Church Street, the third turning on the right hand from Shoreditch.
  • COACHMAKERS' HALL, Noble Street, Foster Lane, is about the sixth of a mile on the right hand from No. 147, Cheapside. It is a spacious and commodious hall, originally built by the Scriveners' Company, who, falling into poverty, sold it to the Coachmakers. It was celebrated at the beginning of the revolutionary war with France as the resort of a debating society, which was put down for inculcating greater notions of public liberty than pleased the minister of the day.

The company of Coachmakers was originally incorporated by letters patent of Charles II. in 1671, by the name of \\ldblquote The Master, Wardens, Assistants and Commonalty of the Company of Coach and Coach harness makers of London.\\rdblquote It is the seventy-ninth livery company of the city in order of precedence.

  • [[COACH AND HORSES YARD. - 1. in Mount Street, Berkeley Square. - 2. is in Old Burlington Street - 3. is in Charles Street, Drury Lane. - 4. is in Aldersgate Street. - 5. is in York Street, Westminster. - &#0;??? 6. is in Northumberland Alley, Fenchurch Street. - 7. is in Coleman Street, the third turning on the left from London Wall.
  • COADE'S ROW, Lambeth, is in the Westminster Bridge Road, about six houses on the left hand from the Surrey foot of Westminster Bridge.
  • COAL EXCHANGE, Lower Thames Street, is nearly opposite Billingsgate, and about a furlong on the left hand below London Bridge.
  • [[COAL HARBOUR. - [see Cold Harbour]
  • COAL METERS' OFFICE, for Westminster, is in Northumberland Street, Strand, about twelve houses on the left hand from the Strand, near Charing Cross.
  • COAL METERS' LAND OFFICE, for the City, is at the Coal Market, or Exchange, in Lower Thames Street, It is managed by fifteen principal coal meters in trust for the city, chosen from the members of the common council, who remain in office for four years, if so long in the common council. Mr. William Drummer is Chief Clerk, and Messrs. John Freeman and William Vale, Jun., Assistant Clerks.
  • COAL YARD, Drury Lane, is ten houses southward of Holborn.
  • COBS COURT, Broadway, Blackfriars, is about eight houses on the left hand from Ludgate Street along Pilgrim Street; it leads into Shoemakers Row.
  • COB'S YARD, Middlesex Street, formerly Petticoat Lane, is the second turning on the right hand northward of Wentworth Street; it leads into Cox's Square.
  • [[COBHAM PLACE. - 1. is in New North Street, Finsbury. - 2. is in Coldbath Square, Gray's Inn Lane Road.
  • COBHAM ROW, Coldbath Square, is on the west side of the square, nearly opposite the House of Correction.
  • COBLEY'S COURT, Whitechapel, is the third turning on the left hand in Essex Street, five houses from Wentworth Street, going towards Whitechapel. It is some times corruptly called Cobbler's Court.
  • COBORN ROAD, Mile End Road, is a new road, the first turning on the left beyond Morgan Square, about a quarter of a mile beyond the Regent's Canal. It leads into Bearbinder Lane, and onwards to Old Ford.
  • COBORN ROW, Mile End Road, is a short distance beyond the preceding.
  • COBORN STREET, is the first turning on the left beyond Coborn Road.
  • COBOURG ROW, Old Kent Road, is near the Duke of Wellington public house.
  • COBOURG ROW, Westminster, is in Spencer's Row, Palmer's Village.
  • COBOURG STREET, Deptford Lower Road, turns off at No. 1, Cobourg Place.
  • COBOURG STREET, Somers Town, turns off at No. 47, Drummond Street West, at the back of Southampton Place, New Road.
  • COBOURG STREET, Clerkenwell, turns off at No. 1, Meredith Street, St. John's Street Road.
  • COBOURG STREET, Commercial Road, is on the south side of the road, between Cannon Street Road and Dock Street, to which it nearly jo&#0;???ins.
  • COBOURG TERRACE, Westminster, is in the Horse Ferry Road, near the Gray Coat School.
  • COBOURG THEATRE, THE]], ROYAL]], is situated at the corner of the Waterloo Bridge Road and the New Cut, Lambeth Marsh. It derives its name, as do the nine preceding from the late much lamented. Princess Charlotte of Wales and Saxe-Cobourg. It was built in 1816-1818, by Mr. Glossop, from the designs of Signor Cabanel, an Italian architect of great taste, and is one of the most elegant and best constructed theatres of its size in the metropolis. It is now under the management of Mr. Davidge, a comedian of great comic humour.
  • [[COCK ALLEY. - 1. is in Hartshorn Court, Moor Lane, Finsbury. - 2. is in Shoreditch, the second turning on the right hand northward of Church Street, Bethnal Green, it leads into Cock Lane and Old Nichol Street, Bethnal Green. - 3. is in Upper East Smithfield, opposite No. 94, about a furlong on the left from Tower Hill, and leads to Cartwright Square, Rosemary Lane.
  • [[COCK COURT. - 1. is in Broad Street, Golden Square, extending from New Street to Hopkins Street. - 2. is in Sharp's Alley, Cow Cross, the first turning on the left from Duke's Court, West Street. - 3. is in Tottenham Court Road, a few houses on the left from Oxford Street. - 4. is on Snow Hill, a few houses on the left hand eastward of Farringdon Street. - 5. is in St. Martin's-le-Grand, about seven houses on the left from Newgate Street. - 6. is on Ludgate Hill, opposite the Old Bailey; it leads into the Broadway, Blackfriars. - 7. is in Philip Lane, Wood Street, seven houses on the left from Addle Street, Aldermanbury. - 8. is in Turnmill Street, Clerkenwell, the fourth turning on the left from the Session's House, going towards Smithfield. - 9. is in Norton Falgate, opposite White Lion Street. - 10. is in Jewry Street, Aldgate, seven houses on the right from Aldgate High Street - 11. is in the Haymarket.
  • [[COCK HILL. - 1. is in Anchor Street, Spitalfields, the first turning on the right from Shoreditch. - 2. is at the east end of New Street, Bishopsgate. - 3. is at Ratcliffe, the eastern continuation of Shadwell High Street, on to Broad Street.
  • COCK AND HOOP YARD, Houndsditch, is opposite Duke Street, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from opposite Bishopsgate Church.
  • COCK LANE, Giltspur Street, is the first turning on the left from Newgate Street towards Smithfield.
  • COCK LANE, Shoreditch, is behind No. 66, and extends from Church Street, Bethnal Green, to Castle Street.
  • COCK PIT, THE]], Westminster. - [see Privy Council Office]
  • COCK PIT ALLEY, Drury Lane, is near the middle of the east side, leading into Great Wild Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields.
  • COCK PIT COURT, Fleet Street, is the second turning on the left in Poppin's Court, near Farringdon Street.
  • COCK PIT YARD, GREAT]], James Street, Bedford Row, is the first turning parallel to James Street; it extends from the King's Road to Little James Street.
  • COCK PIT YARD, LITTLE]], James Street, Bedford Row, is at the south end of the preceding.
  • COCKSPUR STREET, Charing Cross, is the continuation westward from the Strand, and extends from the King's Mews to the Haymarket.
  • [[C&#0;???OHEN'S RENTS]], Goodman's Fields, are about the middle of the east side of Mill Yard.
  • COLBATCH'S LEGAL WAREHOUSE, Globe Yard, Lower Thames Street, nearly opposite the eastern end of the Custom House, where goods may be deposited without payment of duties as specified in the warehousing act.
  • COLCHESTER STREET, Crutched friars, is on the north side of Trinity Square, about six houses on the left in Savage Gardens.
  • COLCHESTER STREET, Whitechapel, is in Red Lion Street, about eight houses on the left from Whitechapel High Street.
  • COLDBATH FIELDS, Clerkenwell, a district so called, having been formerly spacious fields, is on the south side of Pentonville.
  • COLDBATH SQUARE, Coldbath Fields, is situated between Coppice Row and Great Warner Street, opposite the entrance to the House of Correction.
  • COLD HARBOUR, Upper Thames Street, is a narrow lane, consisting principally of warehouses; but formerly the site of a magnificent mansion, of which mention is made in Rymer's F\\'9cdera, so early as the thirteenth of Edward II., when it was let by the name of the Cold Herbergh, or Inn. It afterwards became the property of Sir John Pounteney, and was called Pounteney's Inn. It passed from him to Humphry Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex, and in 1397, John Holland, Duke of Exeter, lodged here and gave a sumptuous entertainment to Richard II., his brother in law. Passing through various hands, among which, were Henry V., when Prince of Wales, it became the residence of Cuthbert Tonstal, Bishop of Durham, when Henry VIII. took Durham house, near Charing Cross, into his own hands. The bishop lived here till 1553, when being deposed, it was given by Edward VI. to the Earl of Shrewsbury, and being destroyed by the great fire of 1666, it descended to its present state of humble utility.
  • COLE'S BUILDINGS, West Smithfield, are on the north side of Long Lane, four houses westward of Charter House Street.
  • COLE STAIRS, Shadwell, are at the bottom of Gold Street, about two miles below London Bridge.
  • COLEBROOK PLACE, Hoxton, is the fifth turning on the left from Old Street Road near Turner's Square.
  • COLEBROOK SQUARE, Hoxton, is the first turning on the left hand northward of Gloucester Street, Hoxton Town.
  • COLE HARBOUR, Hackney Road, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from Shoreditch Church.
  • [[COLEMAN COURT. - 1. is in Bunhill Row, the first turning on the left in Coleman Street, a few yards from Bunhill Row. - 2. is near the west end of Castle Street, Southwark.
  • [[COLEMAN PLACE. - 1. is in Ratcliffe Row, City Road, about the middle of the south side of the road, near the north end of Ironmonger's Row. - 2. is in Coleman Street, Bunhill Row.
  • COLEMAN STREET, Bunhill Row, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from Chiswell Street, and is the next Street southward of Banner Street.
  • [[COLEM&#0;???AN STREET]], LOWER]], is at the end of the preceding, next Bunhill Row.
  • COLEMAN STREET, Lothbury, is the north continuation of the Old Jewry from Cheapside, bearing to the right, and extending to No. 63, Fore Street, Cripplegate. This street gives its name to the ward in which it is situated.
  • [[Coleman Street Ward is bounded on the north by Cripplegate Ward, the south part of Finsbury and Bishopsgate Ward; on the east by Bishopsgate, Broad Street and Cheap Wards; on the south by Cheap Ward; and on the west by Bassishaw Ward. It extends from the church in Lothbury to Ironmonger Lane, and from Moorgate to Grocers Hall Gardens.

The principal streets in this ward are Coleman Street, the northern end of the Old Jewry, Lothbury from Coleman Street to St. Margaret's Church on the north side, and on the south to about twenty-seven feet beyond Princes Street; the north side of Cateaton Street, from Basinghall Street to Coleman Street, and the south side from Ironmonger Lane. The most remarkable buildings are, the parish churches of St. Stephen, Coleman Street, St. Margaret, Lothbury, and St. Olave Jewry, Founders Hall, the Armourers and Braziers Hall, and part of the hall of the Mercers Company in Fenchurch Place, Old Jewry, where the Excise Office formerly stood. - [see those several places and buildings]

This ward is governed by an alderman, Sir John Perring, Bart., a deputy, and nine other common councilmen, and other ward officers.

  • COLEMAN STREET, Shadwell, is the first Street northward of, and parallel to, Wapping Wall.
  • COLEMANS YARD, Bermondsey Street, is the third turning on the right hand beyond the church, going towards Tooley Street.
  • COLLEGE COURT, Smithfield, turns off at No. 61, Cow Cross Street.
  • COLLEGE GROVE, St. Pancras, is in the King's Road, near the workhouse and the Veterinary College, whence it takes its name.
  • COLLEGE HILL, Upper Thames Street, extends from opposite No. 19, Cloak Lane, into Thames Street, nearly opposite Brick Hill Lane, between and parallel to Queen Street and Dowgate Hill, It derives its name from being for centuries the site of Whittington's College, which is now removed to Highgate Hill. It is also the site of the handsome Church of St. Michael, Paternoster Royal; and its neighbouring street, Tower Royal, was anciently the residence of the Queens Dowager of England, hence the name of the church.
  • [[COLLEGE PLACE. - 1. is at Lambeth in Isabella Street, near the Cobourg Theatre. - 2. is in College Street, Camden Town, near the Veterinary College.
  • COLLEGE ROW, Chelsea, is also called Royal Hospital Row, which see.
  • COLLEGE SQUARE, Doctors' Commons, is the quadrangle belonging to the college. It has one entrance from Great Knight Rider Street, and another from Bennett's Hill.
  • [[COLLEGE STREET. - 1. is in Belvedere Road, Lambeth. - 2. is at Queen's Elms, Brompton. - 3. is at Camden Town, by the side of the Veterinary College. - 4. is at Newington butts. - 5. is in Tooley Street, Southwark. - 6. is in Abingdon Street, Westminster, in which is Little College Street, turning off at No. 9. - 7. is on College Hill, Queen Street, Cheapside, opposite Maiden Lane, by the side of the church, and was formerly called Elbow Lane; and Little Elbow Lane, which runs out of it into Upper Thames Street&#0;???, is also now called Little College Street. - 8. is in Narrow Wall, Lambeth, about a quarter of a mile on the left from Westminster Bridge, towards Blackfriars, extending from opposite Vine Street, to King's Arms Stairs. - 9. is in Tooley Street, about a third of a mile on the right hand, going from London Bridge; it leads into Red Lion Court and Bermondsey Street.
  • [[COLLEGE TERRACE. - 1. is at Brompton, in College Street, Queen's Elms. - 2. is on Chelsea Common.
  • COLLEGE YARD, Southwark, is on the north side of St. Margaret's Hill, and the first turning on the left in Counter Street, going towards the Borough Market.
  • [[COLLEGE OF ADVOCATES. - [see Doctors' Commons]
  • [[COLLEGE GOD'S GIFT. - [see Dulwich College]
  • COLLEGE, GRESHAM. - [see Gresham College]
  • [[COLLEGE OF HERALDS. - [see Heralds College]
  • COLLEGE, KING'S. - [ see King's College]
  • [[COLLEGE OF LONDON. - [see London University]
  • [[COLLEGE OF MINOR CANONS. - [see St. Paul's College]
  • COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, THE]], is situated in Pall Mall East, and extends towards Cockspur Street, its flank forming a wing to the Union Club House. The principal front is composed of an hexastyle portico of the Ionic order, with an appropriate pediment, and the whole building is chaste, elegant and ornamental. It was designed by Mr. Smirke and is more decorative than most of that architect's works. A well engraved view and full description of this building is given in my work of London in the Nineteenth Century, to which the reader is referred.

The College of Physicians was established in 1623, by a charter from Henry VIII., which authorized its council to prevent any person from publicly practising as a physician, within seven miles of London, without previously becoming either a fellow or a licentiate of the college; and other important privileges.

The society's first building was a mansion in Great Knight Rider Street, Doctors' Commons, that was presented to them by Dr. Linacre, physician to Henry VIII. They afterwards removed to a house which they purchased in Amen Corner, Paternoster Row, where Dr. Harvey, the illustrious discoverer of the circulation of the blood, built a library, and public hall, which he granted for ever to the college, and endowed it with his estate, which he resigned to them in his life time. This building was destroyed by the great fire in 1666, after which, in 1674, the college purchased a piece of ground in Warwick Lane, Newgate Street, and raised a considerable sum for the erection of a new college.

This building was designed by Sir Christopher Wren, and finished in 1689. The theatre, of which two plans, an elevation and a section, are given in my Memoirs of Sir Christopher Wren, is simple and theatrical in plan, and is one of the best that can be imagined for seeing, hearing, and the due classification of the students, fellows and professors, and for the display of anatomical demonstrations or philosophical experiments upon a table in the centre of the arena, of any building of its size in existence. This admirable structure being how abandoned by the learned and scientific body for whom it was erected, and its demolition near at h&#0;???and, the whole building being occupied by a manufacturing coppersmith, it is worth an inspection of the architectural amateur, before its destruction is complete.

The present officers and members of the college are Sir Henry Halford, Bart., F.R. and A.S., Physician to the King, President; Thomas Turner, M.D., Treasurer; Francis Hawkins, M.D., Registrar; four Censors and twelve Electors, a certain number of Fellows, who must be duly qualified; Candidates for fellowships; Inceptor Candidates, Licentiates, and Extra Licentiates.

  • COLLEGE, SION. - [see Sion College]
  • COLLEGE OF SURGEONS, THE ROYAL]], is situated on the south side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. The portico is hexastyle, of the Ionic order, with a proper entablature and acroteria. In the frieze is inscribed
  • [[COLLEGIUM \\bullet REGALE \\bullet CHIRUROGUM

Upon the acroteria above the entablature are a row of antique bronze tripods, which are attributes of Apollo Medicus, the ancient tutelary god of surgery. Over the centre intercolumniation is a massive shield, on which is sculptured the armorial bearings of the College, supported by two classical figures of \\'c6sculapius, with his club and mystic serpent. In the interior, are a spacious and handsome museum, board and council rooms, libraries, conversation rooms a handsome hall and domestic apartments. It was designed by the late George Dance, Esq., R.A., and is altogether one of the most classical and appropriate buildings in the metropolis.

The surgeons were originally incorporated with the barbers by Edward IV. in 1461, by the name of the Company of Barbers, who were then the only practitioners of surgery. But as others afterwards practised this latter art who were not barbers, they were also incorporated with them by Henry VIII., by act of Parliament, under the name of the Company of Barber Surgeons, and enjoined that those who practised shaving were not to practise surgery, except drawing teeth; and those who practised surgery were forbidden to shave.

In the 6th Charles I. the surgeons obtained further privileges, but continued in an ill assorted union with the barbers till 1745, when they separated themselves from the shavers, who, however retained their ancient hall, built by Inigo Jones, and all their pictures and anatomical preparations. - [see Barbers' Hall] - On which occasion they procured an act of parliament, by which they were solely incorporated by the name of \\ldblquote The Master, Governors and Commonalty of the Art and Science of Surgery of London.\\rdblquote They therefore erected themselves a handsome hall on the site of the New Sessions House in the Old Bailey, in which they continued till they built their present handsome structure before described, and procured their ci-devant company to be elevated to the rank of a college, by royal charter in 1800.

The present officers of the college are a council, of which Honoratus Leigh Thomas, Esq., F.R.S., is the President; Sir William Blizard, Sir Astley Cooper, John Abernethy, Esq., and sixteen other eminent surgeons, Vice Presidents; seven Curators of the Museum; Sir William Blizard and Sir Everard Home, Honorary Professors of Anatomy and Surgery; George Guthrie and Herbert Mayo, Esqrs., Professors of Anatomy and Surgery; Count Cuvier, Honorary Member; E. A. Wilde, Esq., Solicitor; Edmund Balfour, Esq., Secretary; William Clift, Esq., F.R.S., Conservator of the Museum; W. H. Clift, Esq., Assistant; Robert Willis, Esq., Librarian; and William Stone, Beadle and Mace-bearer.

  • COLLEGE, WESTMINSTER. - [see Westminster College]
  • COLLEGIATE CHAPTERS, THE]], &#0;???OF St. KATHERINE AND WESTMINSTER. - [see their respective heads]
  • COLLET PLACE, Ratcliffe, is at the north end of White Horse Street, by the workhouse, near the south side of Stepney Churchyard.
  • COLLIER'S COURT, Bethnal Green, is two houses on the right hand in Fleet Street, going from George Street, Brick Lane.
  • COLLIER'S COURT, Mill Lane, Tooley Street, is the first turning on the right from Tooley Street.
  • COLLIER'S RENTS, Southwark, is the fifth turning on the left hand in White Street, near the back of St. George's Church.
  • COLLIER STREET, Pentonville, is the first turning in North Street, parallel northward to part of the High Road; it extends from Rodney Street to Winchester Street.
  • COLLIN'S COURT, Shadwell, is the first turning on the left in Farmer Street, going from No. 38, High Street.
  • COLLINS'S PLACE, Poplar High Street, is about half a mile on the left, eastward of the Commercial Road.
  • [[COLLINGWOOD PLACE. - 1. is in Ratcliffe, a few houses on the left in Broad Street, going from Cock Hill. - 2. is in Trafalgar Street, City Road.
  • COLLINGWOOD STREET, Bethnal Green, is the third turning on the left hand in Mount Street, going from No. 46, Church Street, or the first turning on the right from Virginia Street, behind Shoreditch Church.
  • COLLINGWOOD STREET, City Road, is the first street parallel northward to the City Terrace, opposite Fountain Place; it extends from Providence Street or Westmoreland Place to Trafalgar Street.
  • COLLINGWOOD STREET, Great Charlotte Street, Blackfriars' Road, is the south continuation of Green Walk to Lambeth Marsh, and the first turning on the right going from Surrey Chapel.
  • COLLITCH PLACE, Newington, Surrey, is the first turning on the right hand in Cross Street, a few yards beyond the church.
  • COLONIAL SLAVES REGISTRY OFFICE, is at No. 13, James Street, Buckingham Gate. - The officers are Thomas Amyot, Esq., F.R. and A.S., Registrar; Richard G. Amyot, Esq., and Sir James Cockburn, Bart., Clerks.
  • COLONNADE, THE]], Brunswick Square, is the first turning parallel northward to part of Upper Guilford Street; it extends from No. 12, Grenville Street, to Colonnade Mews, which lead into Bernard Street.
  • COLONNADE MEWS, Brunswick Square, are the before named mews, from the Colonnade to Bernard Street.
  • COLOSSEUM, THE]], Regent's Park, is a colossal building on the eastern side of the Regent's Park, between Park Square and Cambridge Terrace. It contains a panoramic view of London, and the surrounding country, as far as the eye can see, taken by Mr. Hornor, a land surveyor, from a temporary observatory, that was raised above the cross of St. Paul's Cathedral, during the construction of the present new ball and cross by C. R. Cockerell, Esq., A.R.A.

During the progress of the sketches, I was occasionally a witness to the precision with which the original projector of this immense picture, determined the situations of the various buildings on his paper, and of his extreme inaccuracy as &#0;???to architectural details. At this period I was engaged with Mr. Hornor, as his architect, in making a series of designs for a building to contain his vast project, from a temporary timber building of ninety feet diameter for the Green Park, through a variety of others, circular and polygonal of various diameters and of various orders; till one of the Tuscan order, for this very spot, suggested by me, was approved by Mr. Nash, as architect to the crown, to whom I originally introduced Mr. Hornor. Necessity, however, or some more powerful influence, induced the artist (after a very complimentary letter to me, with hopes of a long continuance of our friendship, and expressions of his satisfaction with my exertions,) to employ Mr. Decimus Burton to superintend the execution of the building, which, as far as external design consists, is precisely the same as one of mine, namely, a sixteen sided polygon, with a Doric portico and cupola.

The grandest feature of this building is its portico, which is one of the finest and best proportioned of the Greco-Doric in the metropolis, and gives a majestic feature to this part of the park. The lodges are in equal good taste, and do great credit to their architect, Mr. Decimus Burton.

The building is, however, wrongly named, for it is more like the Pantheon at Rome, than the mighty Colosseum, of which the ancient proverb ran;

\\ldblquote While stands the Colosseum, Rome shall stand.\\rdblquote

The sponsor of this building named it, I presume, Colosseum, from its colossal dimensions, but it makes one involuntarily start a comparison, and wish that such an inappropriate name had not been chosen. Why! the huge blocks of Travertine marble, of which the Colosseum was heaped on high by the imperial command of Vespasian, would outnumber the nine inch bricks of its modern namesake.

Of the Panorama within its walls, it is impossible to speak too highly; its deception is so complete, and the accuracy of the architectural and other details so correct. Every church, house and other building may be known, and like the real view, will bear even the test of telescopic examination. It was painted, and the sketches finished by Mr. E. T. Parris and his assistants, and is of the enormous size of 46,000 square feet of surface.

The view from the top of the cupola of the surrounding country is very fine, and the spectator is interested by an inspection of the original ball and cross of the Cathedral. Under the Panorama is a circular saloon for the exhibition of works of art, and for refreshments. It contains many fine pieces of sculpture, and is ever varying as sales take place, and fresh subjects arrive. In the circular tube that goes up the centre of the building is an ascending room, by which persons who wish it, may enter at the bottom and in a few seconds find themselves at the top. There are also some beautiful conservatories, full of the finest varieties of exotics, and from the agreeable warmth produced by hot water, will be an attractive promenade in the winter season; a splendid fountain, and a very beautiful Swiss cottage of several apartments, in which the architectural characteristics of the chalet are well preserved. From the windows are seen real waterfalls, rocks, mountain scenery, and a lake, with beautiful foreign waterfowl. It is now the property of Mr. Hornor's trustees, and under most judicious management. A more detailed account of this structure is to be found in my work of London in the Nineteenth Century.

  • COLOUR COURT, Southwark, turns off at No. 14, the first turning on the right hand from Queen Street.
  • COLVILLE COURT, Charlotte Street, Mary-le-bone Place, extends into John Street, three doors&#0;??? southward of Goodge Street, Tottenham Court Road.
  • COMMERCE ROW, Blackfriars' Road, is part of the west side of the High Road, about a quarter a quarter of a mile on the right hand from the bridge, and nearly opposite Surrey Chapel.
  • COMMERCIAL DOCKS, which are situated on the western side of Limehouse Reach, between the Thames and the Grand Surrey Inner and Outer Docks. They extend from a short distance of Queen Street, Deptford, opposite the entrance to the basin of the Regent's Canal on the north, and to the East Country Dock on the south. They consist of five spacious and commodious docks, with an entrance from the Thames between Randall's Rents and Dog and Duck Stairs, nearly opposite King's Arms Stairs in the Isle of Dogs.

The affairs of this company are managed by Benjamin Shaw, Esq., Chairman and Treasurer; Robert Humphry Martin, Esq., Deputy Chairman; eight Directors; three Auditors; William Allan, Esq., Secretary; James Walker, Esq., Engineer; David Waters, Esq., Superintendant.

  • COMMERCIAL HALL or SALE ROOMS, Mincing Lane, is a public building erected in 1811 by subscription for the public sale of Colonial produce of every kind. It is a substantial and handsome building, designed by Joseph Woods, Esq., F.S. A., author of Letters of an Architect. The elevation next Mincing Lane consists of a lofty rusticated basement, supporting an upper story of the Ionic order. It is ornamented with appropriate basso rilievo by J. G. Bubb. It contains spacious sale rooms, coffee rooms, and public and private offices
  • COMMERCIAL PLACE, Commercial Road, is part of the south side of that road, about a furlong on the right hand eastward of the Halfway House; it extends from Lucas Place to John Street.
  • COMMERCIAL ROAD, Whitechapel, is the eastern continuation of Church Street, across Stepney Fields and Causeway to the West India Docks and Poplar. It is about two miles in length, and is continued by the East India Road to the East India Docks.
  • COMMERCIAL ROAD, Lambeth, leads from Upper Ground Street, Blackfriars' Road, to Waterloo Bridge.
  • COMMERCIAL TERRACE, Commercial Road, Limehouse, is on the south side of the road, a few houses eastward of Limehouse Church, by the end of Gill Street.
  • COMMISSARY GENERAL'S OFFICE, Great George Street, Westminster, is at the third house on the right hand, going from Westminster Bridge towards the park.
  • [[COMMISSIONERS FOR BUILDING NEW CHURCHES [see Churches additional, commissioners for building]
  • COMMISSIONERS UNDER THE NEW POLICE ACT, OFFICE OF]], is at No. 4, Whitehall Place. Lieut. Col. Charles Rowen, and Richard Mayne, Esq., Commissioners; John Wray, Receiver. - [see Police Offices]
  • COMMISSIONERS OF SEWERS, LAMPS AND PAVEMENTS]], FOR THE CITY OF LONDON]], OFFICE]], is at Guildhall, the last door on the left hand, up stairs, between the Old and New Council Chambers. The present commissioners are, all t&#0;???he aldermen, the recorder, common serjeant, and the several deputies, with a common councilman for every ward, except those of Farringdon Without and Within, which send two. They have a principal and assistant clerk, a surveyor, Samuel Acton, Esq., and six inspectors.
  • COMMISSIONERS FOR SEWERS, &c. FOR WESTMINSTER. Their office is at the north east corner of Greek Street and Soho Square,
  • COMMISSIONERS OF SEWERS, &c. FOR THE FINSBURY DIVISION]], is a few houses on the right hand side of Hatton Garden, from Holborn.
  • [[COMMITTEE FOR TRADE AND PLANTATIONS. - [see Board of Council for Trade, &c.]
  • COMMONS, HOUSE OF]], Old Palace Yard, Westminster, is on the south side of Westminster Hall, facing the Abbey.
  • COMMON BAIL OFFICE, (K.B.) King's Bench Office, Temple; the hours of attendance are from 11 to 2, and from 6 to 7 in term; and from 11 to 3 in vacation.
  • COMMON PLEAS, COURT OF]], is held at Westminster Hall, and at Guildhall, King Street, Cheapside.
  • COMPTON COURT, NEW]], turns off at No. 65, Broad Street, Bloomsbury, into Compton Street.
  • COMPTON MEWS, Brunswick Square, turns out of Compton Street.
  • COMPTON PASSAGE, Clerkenwell, the first turning on the right from off No. 198, St. John's Street.
  • COMPTON PLACE, Brunswick Square, runs northward from the east end of Henrietta Street into Harrison Street, Gray's Inn Road.
  • COMPTON STREET, Brunswick Square, is the second turning to the left in Hunter Street, and extends into Marchmont Street.
  • COMPTON STREET, Clerkenwell, turns off to the right at No. 198, St. John's Street, about one third of a mile from Smithfield, and extends into Goswell Street.
  • COMPTON STREET, NEW]], Broad Street, Bloomsbury, is the first turning eastward of the church, and the first westward of Monmouth Street; it extends into Crown Street.
  • COMPTON STREET, LITTLE]], is the west continuation of the, last from Crown Street to Greek Street, Soho Square.
  • COMPTON STREET, OLD]], is the western continuation of the last from Greek Street to Prince's Street.
  • COMPTROLLER OF ARMY ACCOUNTS' OFFICE, is in Whitehall Yard, opposite the Horse Guards. The present chief officers are Colonel John Drinkwater, Sir William L. Henries, K.C.H. and John King, Esq., Comptrollers, the Hon. William Rodney, Secretary.
  • COMPTROLLER'S OFFICE, CITY]], Guildhall, the first door on the left hand under the central porch. The comptroller has the drawing of all the City leases and other similar business. The present Comptroller is Joseph Bushman Esq; Deputy Comptroller, Francis Bligh Hookey, Esq.
  • CONDUIT COURT, Long Acre, is near the west end of that street, and leads into Hart Street, Covent Garden, seventeen houses from St. Martin's Court.
  • CONDUIT STREET, Hanove&#0;???r Square, extends from Regent Street, across Mill Street, into New Bond Street.
  • CONNAUGHT PLACE, Edgeware Road, is a few yards on the right hand from the western extremity of Oxford Street.
  • CONNAUGHT SQUARE, Edgeware Road, extends from Upper Seymour Street, northward, into Upper Berkeley Street, West.
  • CONNAUGHT TERRACE, is on the western side of the Edgeware Road, near Upper Seymour Street.
  • CONSTITUTION HILL, Green Park, St. James's, is the road which rises between St. James's Park and Hyde Park Corner.
  • CONSTITUTION ROW, Gray's Inn Lane, is on the east side, about three quarters of a mile on the right hand from Holborn.
  • CONTENTMENT ROW, Hoxton, is the north continuation of Gloucester Terrace, opposite Britt's Buildings, about half a mile on the right hand from Old Street Road.
  • CONTINENTAL SOCIETY FOR PROTESTANT MISSIONS BY MEANS OF NATIVE PREACHERS OF VARIOUS NATIONS, was established in 1818. Their office is in Bartlett's Buildings, Holborn. The present officers of this society are Sir Thomas Baring, Bart., M.P., President; seven Vice Presidents; John Scott, Esq., Treasurer; the Rev. Isaac Saunders, Rectory House, Blackfriars, Secretary, M. de Caligny, Foreign, Secretary. For further particulars of this society, see Highmore's Philanthropia Metropolitana, p. 123.
  • CONWAY COURT, Mary-le-bone, is between No. 10, Paradise Street and No. 49, Paddington Street.
  • CONWAY MEWS, Fitzroy Square, are at the south end of Conway Street, by London Street.
  • [[CONWAY STREET Fitzroy Square, is at the south west corner of the square, and extends to No. 26.
  • CONWAY STREET, UPPER]], Fitzroy Square, is at the north west corner of the square, opposite the last.
  • COOK'S ALMS HOUSES, Spring Street, Shadwell, are on the south side of Shadwell Churchyard.
  • COOK'S, CAPTAIN]], ALMS HOUSES]], Mile End, are about two miles on the left hand from Aldgate, and opposite York Place.
  • COOK'S BUILDINGS, Stoney Lane, Houndsditch, are the last turning but one on the left hand, near Middlesex Street.
  • [[COOK'S COURT. - 1. is in Primrose Street, Bishopsgate Without, a few houses on the right from No. 110, Bishopsgate, and leads into Long Alley. - 2. is in Carey Street, Chancery Lane, and leads from No. 99, Chancery Lane into Searle Street.
  • COOK'S PASSAGE, Park Lane, is a few yards on the left hand in North Row, going from Park Street towards Park Lane.
  • COOK'S ROW, St. Pancras, is about fourteen houses northward of the church, towards Camden Town.
  • COOPER'S BUILDINGS, Cromer Street, Brunswick Square, are a turning at No. 5, Riley Street, near Gray's Inn Road.
  • [[COOPER'S COURT. - 1. is in Great Windmill Street, Haymarket, the first turning on the right f&#0;???rom Piccadilly. - 2. is in Portpool Lane, the first turning on the left from Leather Lane, Holborn. - 3. is in Seward Street, Goswell Street, three doors on the right hand from Brick Lane. - 4. is in Whitecross Street, Cripplegate, about twelve houses on the right hand from Chiswell Street. - 5. is in Blue Anchor Yard, Rosemary Lane, the last turning on the left, from No. 43, Rosemary Lane, and on the north side of New Martin Street from No. 97, Upper East Smithfield.
  • COOPER'S GARDENS, Hackney Road, are the second turning on the right hand a few houses from Shoreditch Church.
  • COOPER'S HALL, Basinghall Street, is situated about the middle of the west side of the street adjoining the church It is a handsome well built edifice, the hall or banqueting room is of large dimensions, wainscoted to the height of fourteen feet, and paved with marble.

The Cooper's Company was incorporated in 1501 by letters patent of Henry VII., under the title of \\ldblquote The Master, Wardens, and Assistants of the Company of Coopers of London and suburbs thereof;\\rdblquote with power given them by Act of Parliament in the reign of Henry VIII., to search and gauge all beer, ale and soap vessels within the City of London, and two miles round the suburbs; for which they were allowed a farthing for each cask.

This company are guardians or trustees of several excellent charities; among which are the alms houses before mentioned, in Cooper's Square, Ratcliffe, that were founded in 1616, by Tobias Wood, Esq., for the reception of six poor members of their company. Baker's Charity, left to the company by John Baker, in 1490, and renewed in 1693, to pay the churchwardens of St. Michael's, Bassishaw, \\'a320. yearly before Christmas to purchase coals for the poor of that parish; the bequest of Henry Cloker, in 1574, of certain houses in the parish of St. Michael's, near Crooked Lane, for the use of the poor in the Ratcliffe Alms Houses and for other uses, as fully described in the Parliamentary Reports on the Endowed Charities of the City of London.

  • COOPER'S PLACE, Mary-le-bone, is in Little York Place, three houses on the left from Great Quebec Street.
  • COOPER'S ROW, Crutched Friars, is the third turning on the right hand from Mark Lane, and extends to Trinity Square.
  • COOPER'S SQUARE, School House Lane, Ratcliffe, is a few houses on the right hand, going from between Cock Hill and Broad Street towards Stepney Causeway.
  • COOPER'S STREET, Westminster, leads from Orchard Street to Dacre Street, a few houses westward of New Tothill Street.
  • COPENHAGEN PLACE, Limehouse, is on the north side of the New Cut, the first turning on the right in Salmon Lane, going from the Commercial Road towards Stepney.
  • COPPICE ROW, Clerkenwell, is the continuation of Ray Street, from the north west corner of the green.
  • COPPIN COURT, St. Dunstan's Hill, Thames Street, is three houses before coming to Tower Street.
  • COPTHALL BUILDINGS, Throgmorton Street, is the continuation of Copthall Court into Bell Alley, Coleman Street.
  • COPTHALL COURT, Throgmorton Street, is about ten houses on the left hand from the north east corner of the Bank of England, and leads towards Bell Alley, London Wall, and Finsbury Square.
  • CORAM PLACE, Russell Square, is the first turning on &#0;???the right hand in Little Coram Street from No. 64, in Great Coram Street, and leads into Russell Place.
  • CORAM STREET, GREAT]], Brunswick Square, extends from the north west corner of that square into Woburn Place, Russell Square.
  • CORAM STREET, LITTLE]], the first turning parallel eastward to Woburn Place; it extends from Great Coram Street into Tavistock Place under the public house.
  • [[CORBET'S COURT. - 1. is in Gracechurch Street, about seven houses on the right hand from Cornhill. - 2. is in Brown's Lane, Spitalfields, the third turning on the right from Brick Lane. - 3. is in Vine Street, Spitalfields, and leads into the last described.
  • CORDWAINERS' AND BREAD STREET WARD'S CHARITY SCHOOL, Old Change, was established in 1701, for fifty boys and in 1714, for thirty girls, and was for many years supported by voluntary subscriptions alone. The trustees, who are forty in number, are possessed of a farm in Kent, bequeathed to them in 1726, by Mr. John Hutchins, now let at \\'a342. a year, and funded property, partly left by Mr. John Bristow, in 1726, amounting to above \\'a36,000., which with some other arising from the profits of the Bank Stock, left by Mr. Bristow, and from various benefactions and other legacies, amount to the sum of \\'a3573. 18s. a year. Fifty boys and thirty girls are clothed and educated by this charity, and receive rewards, if their conduct has been good, on leaving the school.
  • CORDWAINERS' HALL, is situated on the north side of Great Distaff Lane, Friday Street, and is a handsome convenient building, consisting of a court room, offices, great hall for the general meetings of the livery, and other apartments. In the hall are portraits of King William and Queen Mary. The building was thoroughly repaired, and a very handsome new stone front built from the designs of Mr. Adams one of the Adelphi architects. Over the centre window is a sculptured medallion of a country girl spinning with a distaff, allusive to the name of the lane, and of the thread which cordwainers, the ancient English name of shoemakers, use in their trade.

The Company of Cordwainers (from Corduaners, manufacturers of Corduan or Cordovan leather, from Cordua or Cordova in Spain) or Shoemakers, was originally incorporated in 1410, by Henry IV. under the title of Cordwainers and Cobblers, the latter of which, at that time, meant not only a shoemaker, but a dealer in shoes; nor does it appear that the word shoemaker was then in use. By a move recent charter, the company is now designated, \\ldblquote The Master, Wardens and Commonalty of the Mystery of, Cordwainers of the City of London.\\rdblquote

This company have been appointed trustees and guardians to many useful charities; among which are a bequest of Richard Minge, in 1682, of sundry messuages, &c., near Bankside, Southwark, to be distributed to the poor of St. Anne Aldersgate and St. Leonard, Foster Lane; another of John Fisher, in the 31st of Edward VI., of three houses opposite St. Dunstan's Church, occupied by Messrs. Underwoods, R. Whiteaves and Mrs. Pearson, and four others in Falcon Court, at the side and rear of the Messrs. Underwoods, to the poor of St. Dunstan's parish; another of James Shawe, in 1630, of messuages in Smithfield, for the use of fifteen poor free men of the company or widows of the same, and exhibitions for two poor scholars at either of the universities; another of Richard Pendry, in 1639, of houses in Church Row, Fenchurch Street, for poor freemen of the company; another by John Wild, in 1662, of the Bell Inn and other property at Edmonton, for poor freemen of the company; another by John Carney who in 1796, bequeathed the sum of \\'a319,500. 3 per cent consols, \\'a317,700. reduced annuities, and \\'a3100. a year in the short ann&#0;???uities, from which the company began immediately to distribute according to Mr. Came's will, under what is now called \\ldblquote Cames' Charity,\\rdblquote the whole proceeds. In the year 1820, the disbursements of this excellent charity were as follows:-

To\\tab   \\'a3.\\tab s.

Eighty-eight poor Blind Persons\\tab 440\\tab 0 Forty Clergymen's Widows\\tab 200\\tab 0 Forty Deaf and Dumb Persons\\tab 200\\tab 0 Annuities\\tab 190\\tab 0 Clerk's salary, Advertisements, Printing, Petitions, Stamps, &c.\\tab 56\\tab 11

   \\'a31,086.11

Leaving a small surplus in favour of the charity of \\'a39. 13s., to accumulate. They are also trustees under the will of Mr. William Williams, who, in 1809, left \\'a32,000. South Sea Annuities, to make provision for three poor liverymen of the company and their widows. For much more information on these extensive and useful charities, see the Parliamentary Reports on the Endowed Charities of the City of London.

With regard to Cames' Charity, printed forms and every necessary information may be obtained at the Clerk's (John Millard, Esq.) Office, at their hall in Distaff Lane.

  • CORDWAINERS' WARD, which is founded on the north by the Ward of Cheap on the east by that of Walbrook, on the south by that of Vintry, and on the west by that of Bread Street. It extends from Walbrook eastward along Watling Street, to Red Lion Court westward, and its principal Streets, are Bow Lane, Queen Street, Budge Row, Little St. Thomas Apostle, Pancras Lane, Size Lane, Basing Lane and a part, of Watling Street. The principal buildings in this ward are the parish churches of St. Mary-le-Bow, St. Mary Aldermary and St. Anthony's or St. Antholin's. - [see these several places and churches]

It is divided into eight municipal precincts, and is governed by an alderman, Christopher Smith, Esq., M.P., a deputy and seven other common councilmen and other ward officers. CORDWELL'S COURT]], Mary-le-bone Street, Piccadilly, is at No. 11, opposite the north end of Air Street.

  • CORKCUTTER'S STREET, Westminster, is the first turning on the left in Princes Street from Tothill Street.
  • CORK MEWS, Burlington Gardens, are five houses on the left in Cork Street, going from Vigo Street.
  • CORK STREET, Burlington Gardens, is opposite the northern end of Burlington Arcade and reaches from Burlington Gardens, to Clifford Street, between Old Bond Street and Old Burlington Street.
  • CORN EXCHANGE, THE NEW]], Mark Lane, is on the right hand side of Mark Lane, going from Tower Street, and adjoins the Old Corn Exchange. It is a new building, erected in 1827, by a joint stock company, for the use of corn factors, &c., from the designs of George Smith, Esq. and is one of the most agreeable architectural compositions in the metropolis. It is composed of a centre formed by a receding hexastyle portico of the Grecian Doric order, the cornice of which is crowned by a lofty blocking course, which supports a stylobate, bearing the imperial arms of the United&#0;??? Kingdoms, with agricultural trophies and an inscription.
  • CORN EXCHANGE, THE OLD]], Mark Lane, adjoins the preceding; and there is another on the opposite side of the way, on a much smaller scale, also called the New Corn Exchange, which is principally used as a seed market.
  • CORNBURY PLACE, Kent Road, is a part of the south west side of the road near the Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb. It extends from Swan Place to Ortford Row, about a furlong on the right hand below the Bricklayers' Arms.
  • CORNHILL, one of the principal Streets and thoroughfares in the city, extends from the western end of Leadenhall Street, of which it is a continuation, crossing westward to the Mansion house. It is so called from being the spot where the ancient corn market was held, and gives its name to:-
  • CORNHILL WARD, which is very small, and contains only one principal street, that whence it derives its name. It is bounded on the north by Broad Street Ward, on the east by Bishopsgate Ward, on the south by Langbourn Ward, and on the west by Cheap Ward. Its principal buildings are the Royal Exchange, and the parish churches of St. Michael and St. Peter. - [see these severed places and buildings]

This ward is divided into four municipal precincts, and is governed by an alderman, Sir Charles Flower, Bart., a deputy, and five other common councilmen, and other ward officers.

  • CORNWALL ROAD, Waterloo Bridge Road, reaches from the Commercial Road, Lambeth to the New Cut, opposite the Cobourg Theatre.
  • CORNWALL STREET, St. George's in the East, is behind Bath Terrace, near Cannon Street Turnpike.
  • CORNWALL STREET, LOWER]], is the east end of the last, and extends from Charles Street to King David's Fort.
  • CORNWALL TERRACE, Regent's Park, is the first row of houses on the left on entering from opposite Mary-le-bone new Church, between York Terrace and Clarence Terrace. It is one of the earliest, and, at the same time, one of the prettiest of the new terraces erected in this district, and derives its name from one of the titles of George the Fourth when Regent of these Kingdoms. The houses are not on so large a scale as those of York Terrace, but possess a diameter for regular beauty that some of its neighbours want. It is erected from the designs of Mr. Decimus Burton, and possesses a character of enriched architectural beauty, and scholastic regularity much to be admired. The ground story is rusticated, and supports two upper stories decorated with columns and pilasters of the Corinthian order.
  • [[CORPORATION OF SONS OF THE CLERGY. - [see Sons of the Clergy]
  • CORPORATION OFFICE, THE]], is at No. 13, Paper Buildings, Inner Temple, and the hours of attendance are from 10 till 2 and from 4 till 7.
  • CORPORATION COURT, Clerkenwell, is about five houses on the left in Corporation Row, from the north end of St. John Street.
  • CORPORATION LANE, Clerkenwell, is at the north end of Corporation Row, being the last turning on the left from Smithfield.
  • CORRECTION, HOUSE OF]], for the county of Middlesex, is opposite Coldbath Square, in Coldbath Fields.
  • COTTAGE GROVE, Mile End Road, is on the north side of the High Road between Grove Road and Morgan's Square.
  • [[COT&#0;???TAGE LANE]], Commercial Road, is the first turning on the left hand in the Commercial Road.
  • [[COTTAGE PLACE. - 1. is in Chapel Path, Somers Town, about ten houses on the left hand from Brill Row. - 2. is in Poplar, about half a mile on the right hand in the East India Dock Road from Limehouse on the eastern side of the East India Alms Houses. - 3. is in Lion Street, Kent Road the first turning on the left hand, five houses from the said road. - 4. is in Goswell Street Road. - 5. is in Frances Street, Westminster Bridge Road. - 6. is in Crosby Row, Southwark. - 7. is in South Lambeth. - 8. is at No. 175, Long Lane, Southwark. - 9. is near the Orphan School in the City Road.
  • COTTAGE ROW, Bermondsey New Road, part of the east side of the road leading from the Bricklayers' Arms towards Bermondsey Church.
  • COTTAGE ROW, Poplar, extends from Cottage Place to Poplar High Street or Road.
  • COTTERELL'S ALMS HOUSES, are situated in Chapel Yard, Hog Lane, Soho, and were endowed by Sir Charles Cotterell for six sailors' widows of the East India Company.
  • COTTON'S GARDENS, Old Palace Road, Westminster, are nearly opposite the Abbey, and extend towards the Thames.
  • COTTON'S GARDENS, Hackney Road, are the third turning on the left hand in Shoreditch Church.
  • [[COTTON LIBRARY. - [see British Museum]
  • COTTON STREET, Poplar, is the first street parallel eastward to Bow Lane, and leads towards the East India Dock Road.
  • COTTON YARD, Poplar High Street, or Road, is about half a mile from the Commercial Road, on the left, nearly opposite the Charity School and Town Hall.
  • COUNTER ALLEY, Southwark, is opposite No. 66, High Street, about a quarter of a mile on the right from London Bridge, and leads into Counter Street
  • COUNTER ROW, Southwark, is in Mill Lane, Tooley Street.
  • COUNTER STREET, Southwark, leads from the western side of St. Margaret's Hill to Stoney Lane and the Borough Market.
  • COUNTY FIRE AND PROVIDENT LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY'S OFFICE, is at No. 60, Regent Street. It was established in 1807, and possesses a handsome, newly built edifice, much resembling the addition to old Somerset House, by Inigo Jones. It was designed by Robert Abraham, Esq., and has a colossal figure of Britannia on the acroterium of the upper cornice. It is under the management of J. T. Barber Beaumont, Esq., and twelve other Directors, J. B. Beaumont, Esq., Secretary.
  • COUNTY GAOL, THE SURREY]], is in Horsemonger Lane, a few yards on the left hand in Newington Causeway, from Stone's End, going towards the Elephant and Castle.
  • COUNTY NEWSPAPER OFFICE, Warwick Square, is at the above place, where advertisements are taken in for every newspaper in the United Kingdom.
  • COUNTY ROW, Tooley Street, is the first turning on the left hand in Mill Lane, going from Tooley Street.
  • COUNTY STREET, Kent Road, is the first turning on the north in County Terrace.
  • COUNTY TERRACE, WEBB'S]], Kent Road, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from the Elephant and Castle, opposite Rodney's Buildings.
  • COURIER NEWSPAPER OFFICE, Strand, is nearly opposite Wellington Street, Waterloo Bridge, and adjoining the Lyceum theatre, a few houses westward.
  • [[COURT OF ARCHES. - [see Arches, Court of]

For the rest of the law and ecclesiastical courts held in the metropolis, as of Chamberlains', Chancery, Common Pleas, Delegates, Equity, Exchequer, Marshalsea, King's Bench, Palaces, &c., see the respective articles under their several heads.

  • [[COURT OF REQUESTS. - 1. is in Osborn Street, Whitechapel, five houses on the right hand from Whitechapel, nearly opposite the church. - 2. is in Castle Street, Leicester Square, about twelve houses on the right hand from Hemming's Row, St. Martin's Lane. - 3. is in Vine Street, Piccadilly, ten houses from the west end of Brewer Street, Golden Square. - 4. is in Kingsgate Street, Holborn. - 5. is in the New Street between Basinghall Street and Guildhall Yard. - 6. is on St. Margaret's Hill, Southwark.
  • COURT OF RECORD, within the manor of Stepney and Hackney, in the county of Middlesex, is in Whitechapel.
  • COURT STREET, Whitechapel Road, is nearly opposite the London Hospital.
  • COURT YARD, ALBANY. - [see Albany Mansion and Chambers]
  • COUSEN LANE, Upper Thames Street, is opposite Dowgate Hill, and leads to the Thames, about a quarter of a mile above London Bridge.
  • [[COVENT GARDEN is a large quadrangle, situated between the Strand and Long Acre, with Inigo Jones's fine Church of St. Paul on its western side and Russell Street on its eastern. It contains within its spacious area, a new and commodious market, built at the expense of the Duke of Bedford, its ground landlord, by William Fowler, Esq., most substantially erected with granite columns and other durable materials.

This district of the metropolis derives its name from having been formerly a garden belonging to the abbot and monks of the Convent of Westminster, whence it was called Convent and by corruption Covent Garden. At the dissolution of the religious houses, it was given to Edward Duke of Somerset, but on his attainder, it again reverted to the crown, and Edward VI. granted it, in 1552, to John, Earl of Bedford, together with a field called the Seven Acres, which, being built upon for a street,was, from its length, called Long Acre.

  • [[Covent Garden, would have been, if completed according to Inigo Jones's design, one of the finest squares or places (it is called piazza, the Italian for place) in Europe. The proportions of the arcades and piers, crossed with elliptical and semi-circular arches into groins, are exquisitely beautiful, and are masterpieces of architecture.
  • [[COVENT GARDEN CHURCH. - [see St. Paul Covent Garden, The Church of]
  • [[COVENT GARDEN MARKET. - [see the above]
  • COVENT GARDEN THEATRE, is situate at the north east corner of Covent Garden, with its principal front next Bow Street, its northern front next Hart Street, its western next Princes' Place,&#0;??? and its southern next an opening running from Bow Street into the great piazza. It is a handsome and spacious theatre, designed by Robert Smirke, Esq., R.A., and rebuilt after being destroyed by fire in September, 1808. It was re opened in September, 1809, ten months only having been occupied in its erection.

The principal front is embellished with a tetrastyle portico of the Grecian Doric order, with two wings and niches containing statues of Tragedy and Comedy, sad basso rilievo, on each side of the portico, representing the ancient and the modern drama, from the designs and chisel of Flaxman, assisted in the execution by Rossi. The interior is extremely elegant, the scenery incomparable, and the dramatic performances on the first scale of magnificence.

The company at this theatre generally commence their performances about the middle of September and dose about the latter end of July.

For a much more detailed account of the history and description of this splendid national theatrical establishment and a well engraved print of its exterior, the reader is referred to my work of London in the Nineteenth Century, which is exclusively devoted to the metropolitan improvements of the last ten or twelve years.

  • COVENT GARDEN THEATRICAL FUND, Covent Garden Theatre. This charity for the relief of decayed and aged actors, was instituted in 1705, and afterwards confirmed by act of parliament. It is supported by voluntary contributions and a collection at an annual dinner during the session of parliament, which is always attended by the greatest and most celebrated characters of the day. It is in a flourishing condition, but has many claims upon its bounties, which are distributed in a most feeling manner by the committee. Subscriptions are received by John Fawcett, Esq., the Treasurer, at the theatre.
  • COVENT GARDEN WORKHOUSE, is at the north end and east side of Norfolk Street, Middlesex Hospital, nearly facing Foley Street, Portland Road.
  • COVENTRY COURT, Haymarket is a turning on the east side of that street, and leads into Coventry Street.
  • COVENTRY PLACE, Bermondsey, is a few houses on the left in Willow Walk, going from Page's Walk towards the Grange Road.
  • COVENTRY STREET, Haymarket, is the last turning on the right hand from Cockspur Street, Charing Cross, and extends from the east end of Piccadilly to Princes Street, Soho.
  • COW ALLEY, Horselydown, is nearly half a mile on the left hand in Free School Street from London Bridge along Tooley Street.
  • [[COW COURT. - 1. is in Old Street, St. Luke's, the second turning on the left hand, a few houses from Goswell Street. - 2. is in Hare Street, Bethnal Green, the first turning on the right hand, a few doors from Brick Lane. - 3. is in Rotherhithe Street, by the south east corner of the churchyard.
  • COW CROSS, St. John's Street, West Smithfield, is the second turning on the left hand, a few houses from Smithfield. It extends into Turnmill Street, by which it is continued into Clerkenwell Green.
  • [[COW LANE. - 1. is in West Smithfield, at No. 93, the third turning on the left hand from Newgate Street, and leads on to Snow Hill and Farringdon Street. - 2. is in New Gravel Lane, the second turning on the left hand, about nine houses from High Street, Shadwell. - 3. is at Stepney, parallel to and a few yards from the churchyard. - 4. is at Rotherhithe, between Lower Queen Street and Trinity Street, nearly half a mile from the Commercial Docks.
  • [[Cow Yard, Liquorpond Street, Gray's Inn Lane, is the first turning on the right hand, a few yards from Gray's Inn Lane.
  • COW HEEL ALLEY, Whitecross Street, St. Luke's, is five houses on the right from Banner Street, and leads into Golden Lane.
  • COWLEY STREET, Westminster, is the second turning on the right in Cowley Street, a few houses from Millbank Street.
  • COWPER'S COURT, Cornhill, is the first turning on the left from Birchin Lane, and leads from Cornhill by the Jerusalem Coffee House into Birchin Lane.
  • [[COX'S COURT. - 1. is in Aldersgate Street, two houses southwards of Westmoreland Buildings. - 2. is in Little Britain, the second turning on the left hand from St. Bartholomew's Hospital, towards Aldersgate Street. - 3. is in Green Walk, Christ Church, Surrey, the first turning on the left hand from Holland Street by Blackfriars' Bridge. - 4. is in Middlesex Street, Whitechapel, nearly opposite Stoney Lane, about eight houses south from Wentworth Street.
  • COX'S GATEWAY, Bermondsey Street, is about the middle of the west side.
  • COX'S RENTS, City Road, are a few houses on the left hand from the Angel at Islington.
  • COX'S SQUARE, Spitalfields, is situated behind the corner formed by Wentworth Street and Petticoat Lane.
  • CRAB TREE ROW, Hackney Road, is the third turning on the right hand, about a quarter of a mile from Shoreditch Church, opposite Union Street.
  • [[CRADLE COURT. - 1. is in St. Mary Axe, near Bury Court, about twenty houses on the right hand from Leadenhall Street. - 2. is in Redcross Street, Cripplegate, the third turning on the left hand from Barbican; it leads into Bowling Alley and Whitecross Street.
  • CRAIG'S COURT, Charing Cross, is on the east side, a few houses on the left hand from the Strand, going towards Westminster Bridge. In this place is Cox and Greenwood's large army-agency office, which is almost demi-official.
  • CRANBOURNE PASSAGE, Leicester Square, is the first turning on the right hand from Castle Street, and leads into Little Newport Street.
  • CRANBOURNE STREET, Leicester Square, is the first turning on the left in Castle Street, from St. Martin's Court; It leads to the Panorama by the square.
  • [[CRANE COURT. - 1. is in Fleet Street, five houses eastward of Fetter Lane. - 2. is on Lambeth Hill, Doctors' Commons, three houses on the left hand from Old Fish Street.
  • CRANE YARD, OLD]], Leicester Street, is about three houses on the right hand towards Warwick Street.
  • CRAVEN BUILDINGS, Drury Lane, are situated at the west end of Wych Street, and the south end of Drury Lane. It derives its name from having been built on the site of the ancient families of Craven and of Drury, and also that of the Queen of Bohemia, the unfortunate daughter of James II. The remains of this last was taken down by the late John Astley the equestrian, and the present Olympic Theatre built upon its site.
  • CRAVEN BUILDINGS, City Road, is the first turning on the right hand northward of Old Street, about a third of a mile beyond Finsbury Square.
  • CRAVEN COURT, Strand, is about the middle of the east side of Craven Street, and leads into Hungerford Market.
  • CRAVEN STREET, Strand, is ten houses on the right&#0;??? hand from Charing Cross, extending to the Thames.
  • CRAVEN STREET, City Road, is the first turning on the right hand northward of Old Street.
  • CRAVEN YARD, Drury Lane, is about four houses on the right hand from Wych Street towards Holborn.
  • CRAWFORD'S STREET, Mary-le-bone, leads from the north west corner of Baker Street, Portman Square, opposite Paddington Street, into Shouldham Street, Edgeware Road.
  • CRAWFORD'S PASSAGE, Clerkenwell, is the third turning on the right hand in Ray Street, going from the green by the Sessions House. It leads into Coppice Row by the Workhouse.
  • CREE CHURCH LANE, Leadenhall Street, is the first turning on the right hand from Aldgate. It leads into Duke's Place and Houndsditch.
  • CREED LANE, Ludgate Street, is the first turning on the left hand from St. Paul's Churchyard. It leads into Shoemakers' Row, Blackfriars.
  • CRESCENT, Bridge Street, Blackfriars, is part of the eastern side of that street, beginning about six houses on the left from Ludgate Hill.
  • CRESCENT, Jewin Street, Cripplegate, is two houses on the right hand from No. 29, Redcross Street.
  • CRESCENT, Minories, is the second turning on the left hand from Tower Hill.
  • CRESCENT, NORTH]], Bedford Square, is two houses on the left hand in Chenies' Street, going from Tottenham Court Road. It faces the north end of Alfred Place, hence its name as well as that of:-
  • CRESCENT, SOUTH]], Bedford Square, two houses on the right hand in Store Street, going from Tottenham Court Road. It faces the south end of Alfred Place.
  • CRESCENT or CIRCUS, Oxford Street, is at the intersection of Regent Street with Oxford Street.
  • CRESCENT, Somers Town, is the second turning on the left hand in Brill Row from Clarendon Square.
  • CRESCENT, Temple Bar. - [see Pickett Street]
  • CRESCENT STREET, Euston Square, is in Euston Street, at the back of the square.
  • [[CRESCENT PLACE. - 1. is in Bridge Street, Blackfriars, about eight doors on the left from Ludgate Hill going towards the bridge. - 2. is in Burton Crescent, is the centre opening of that crescent, and leads into Burton Street. - 3. is in Hackney Road, at Clarence Place, the third turning on the right from Shoreditch Church. - 4. is in the Lambeth Road, St. George's Fields, part of the south side by St. George's Crescent, and leads from the Obelisk towards Lambeth.
  • CRIPPLEGATE BUILDINGS, Fore Street, Cripplegate, is the north continuation of Wood Street, and leads from London Wall into Fore Street.
  • CRIPPLEGATE CHURCH, Fore Street, Cripplegate, is a few doors on the left hand from the last, going towards Redcross Street.
  • [[CRIPPLEGATE CHURCH. - [see St. Giles', Cripplegate, the Church of]
  • CRIPPLEGATE WARD, derives its name from the very ancient gate which stood 1,032 feet to the westward of Moorgate. Cripplegate was named, say the best authorities, from the number of cripples that formerly begged there. Its great antiquity is proved by being mentioned by this name in the &#0;???history of Edmund, King of the East Angles, so early as 1010, and also in a charter of William the Norman. It underwent various changes, till it was finally pulled down with the others, except Temple Bar, in 1760.

This ward is very large, and consists of two parts, one lying within the ancient gate and London wall, and the other reaching to the extent of the City Liberties, without the walls. It extends from Cheapside on the south, to beyond Bridgewater Square on the north; and from Jewin Street in the west to Finsbury in the east. It is bounded on the north by the parish of St. Luke's without the freedom, and is, therefore, the most northern of the city wards; on the west by Aldersgate ward, on the south by Cheap ward, and on the east by parts of Coleman Street, Bassishaw and Cheap wards.

The principal streets, &c., in Cripplegate Within, are Milk Street, Aldermanbury, Love Lane, Wood Street, Silver Street, Addle Street, parts of Cateaton Street, Hart Street, Monkwell Street, Maiden Lane, Gutter Lane and a small part of Cheapside, namely, 170 feet eastward of Wood Street, Those in Cripplegate Without are Fore Street, Moor Lane, part of Milton Street, formerly Grub Street, Whitecross Street to beyond Beech Lane, Redcross Street, Beech Lane, part of Barbican, the whole of Bridgewater Square and the eastern end of Jewin Street.

The principal buildings in this ward are the parish churches of St. Giles Cripplegate, St. Alphage, St. Alban Wood Street, St. Michael Wood Street, and St. Mary Aldermanbury; Lamb's Chapel, Sion College. Dr. Williams's Library, the new debtors' prison in Whitecross Street, and the halls of the Haberdashers', Wax Chandlers', Plaisterers', Brewers, Curriers', Bowyers' and Loriners' companies. - [see these several places and buildings]

This ward is divided into thirteen principal precincts, nine within the walls and four without, and is governed by an alderman, Matthew Wood, Esq., M.P., two deputies, and fourteen other common councilmen, and other ward officers. Till within these few years this ward had but twelve common councilmen, eight for the ward within and four for that without, but four more have been recently added on the motion of Alderman Wood, to the latter, making now eight for each division of the ward.

  • CRISPIN STREET, Spitalfields, intersects Union Street, and is the third turning from No. 69, Bishopsgate Without.
  • CROMER'S PLACE, Somers Town, is eight or nine houses on the left hand in Manton Street from Phillips's Buildings, Willsted Street.
  • CROMER STREET, Brunswick Square, reaches from Judd Street, Burton Crescent, into Gray's Inn Road, opposite the southern end of Constitution Row.
  • CROOKED LANE, Cannon Street, leads to Miles's Lane; but a portion is about to be built upon for the new approaches to London Bridge.
  • CROOKER'S BUILDINGS, Hoxton, are two doors on the left in Charles Square, Hoxton, going from Pitfield Street towards the square.
  • CROOKET'S ALLEY, Lambeth, is the second turning on the left hand in High Street, going from Broad Street towards Lambeth Church.
  • CROOKED BILLET COURT, Long Alley, Moorfields, is about seven houses on the left from Moorfields towards Sun Street.
  • CROOKED BILLET YARD, Kingsland Road, is the sixth turning on the left hand, about a furlong from Shoreditch Church, and nearly opposite Union Street.
  • CROSBY ROW, Southwark, is the third turning on the right hand down King Street, from No. 108, Borough High Street. It leads into Long Lane, Bermondsey.
  • CROSBY ROW, Walworth, is part of the east side of the High Road, about half a mile on the left hand from the Elephant and Castle.
  • CROSBY SQUARE, Bishopsgate Within, is about ten houses on the right hand from the City of London Tavern. It leads into Crosby Street and St. Mary Axe. It derives its name from being on the site of an ancient mansion, built by Sir John Crosby, citizen and grocer, in 1486, called Crosby Place. This house was the city residence of Richard Duke of Gloucester while the measures that procured him the throne were concerting. The hall and other parts of the house still remain on the northern side of the entrance into the square. The hall is still very perfect, and is a beautiful specimen of the style of architecture of that period. The roof is carved, and scientifically constructed, and is a study of the art. The hall and rooms below are used as warehouses by a packer.
  • CROSBY STREET, St. Mary Axe, is the first turning on the left from No. 117, Leadenhall Street. It leads into Great St. Helens on the right and into Crosby Square on the left.
  • [[CROSS ALLEY. - 1. is in Gun Alley, Wapping, two houses on the right hand from Wapping Street, and leads into Upper Well Alley. - 2. is in King Street, Rotherhithe, the first turning on the left hand from Rotherhithe Street, and leads into Queen Street. - 3. is in Salisbury Street, Bermondsey, the first turning on the left hand from Rotherhithe Wall, and leads into Marigold Street.
  • [[CROSS COURT. - 1. is in Broad Entry, Drury Lane, the first turning on the left hand from Drury Lane, and leads into Duke's Court. - 2. is in Cross Street, Carnaby Market, the continuation of Cross Street from Carnaby Street to the market, and leads into King Street.
  • CROSS GUN COURT, Rosemary Lane, is nearly opposite Darby Street, about the middle the same lane.
  • CROSS KEY COURT, London Wall, is about the middle of the south side, between Leathersellers' Buildings and Black Swan Alley.
  • CROSS KEY COURT, St. John's Street, West Smithfield, is two doors on the left hand from Cow Cross towards St. John's Lane.
  • CROSS KEYS MEWS, Mary-le-bone Lane, are at No. 34, six houses on the left hand from High Street, near Bulstrode Street.
  • CROSS KEY SQUARE, Little Britain, is eight houses on the right hand from Aldersgate Street, going towards West Smithfield.
  • CROSS KEY YARD, Bermondsey Street,is at No. 266, about sixteen houses on the right hand from Tooley Street.
  • [[CROSS LANE. - 1. is at the Neat Houses, Chelsea, nearly half a mile from Pimlico, over the bridge towards the Thames about the middle of Baker's Lane. - 2. is in Long Acre, about the middle of the north side, and is continued by King Street to St. Giles's. - 3. is the continuation of Newton Street, Holborn, and leads into Parker's Lane and Lincoln's Inn Fields. - 4. is in Baker's Lane, Cannon Street, eight houses on the left hand from Cannon Street, and leads into Suffolk Lane. - 5. is on St. Mary's Hill, about eleven houses on the left hand from Little Eastcheap, opposite Rood Lane, and extends to Idol Lane; it is also called Cross Lane. - 6. is in St. Dunstan's Hill, the second &#0;???turning on the left, a few houses from No. 11, Tower Street, and extends to Harp Lane.
  • CROSS ROW, Ratcliffe Square, is on the south side of the square, or the last turning on the left in Periwinkle Street from Brook Street.
  • CROSS ROW, Stepney Green, is the fourth turning on the right hand, about the fifth of a mile from Mile End Road, and leads into Saville Buildings, the south end of Pleasant Row.
  • CROSS STREET, Bermondsey New Road, is the first turning on the left hand in Brandon Street, from No. 17, in the New Road; it extends into Webb Street.
  • CROSS STREET, Bermondsey, or Rotherhithe Wall, is the first turning on the left hand in Marigold Street, and extends into Cherry Garden Street, about six houses from Cherry Garden Stairs.
  • CROSS STREET, Bethnal Green, is the second turning on the left hand in Church Street, going from Shoreditch; it extends into Old Nicol Street.
  • CROSS STREET, Bethnal Green, is the third turning on the left hand in Green Street, nearly the third of a mile from the green; it leads towards Bonner's Hall.
  • CROSS STREET, Commercial Road, is the first turning on the left hand in Morgan Street; it extends into Humberston Street, a few yards westward of Cannon Street Road.
  • CROSS STREET, City Road, is the first turning on the right hand in Westmoreland Row from Providence Street.
  • CROSS STREET, Finsbury Place, is the first turning on the right hand northward of the Pavement; it extends into Wilson Street, and is parallel to the south side of Finsbury Square.
  • CROSS STREET, Golden Square, is the fifth turning on the left hand in King Street, about the fifth of a mile from Oxford Street; it leads into Cross Court and Carnaby Market.
  • CROSS STREET, Hatton Garden, is the second turning on the right hand from Holborn it extends from Kirby Street to Leather Lane.
  • CROSS STREET, Horselydown, is the first turning on the left hand in Fair Street, from the east end of Tooley Street, and nearly facing St. John's Church; it extends into Back Street.
  • CROSS STREET, Hoxton, is the first turning on the right hand in Myrtle Street, Hoxton Town; it extends into Gloucester Street.
  • CROSS STREET, Limehouse, is situated between the church, and the West India Docks; it extends from Rich Street to Jamaica Place East.
  • CROSS STREET, Newington, is the second turning on the left hand from the Elephant and Castle on the Kennington Road, opposite Newington Church. It leads into the Walworth Road.
  • CROSS STREET, New Road, Hans Town, is the first turning on the right hand from the north end of Sloane Street, Knightsbridge.
  • CROSS STREET, Queen Square, Bloomsbury, is the first street parallel to the south side of the square, and leads from Devonshire Street to Gloucester Street.
  • CROSS STREET, Rotherhithe, is the second turning on the left hand in King Street, going from Rotherhithe Street, and opposite King's Stairs; it leads into Queen Street.
  • CROSS STREET, Shoreditch, is the second turning on the right hand in Leonard Street, eastward of Paul Street, Finsbury; it extends into Luke Street.
  • CROSS STREET, St. George's in the East, is in Lower Cornwall Stre&#0;???et, about a quarter of a mile eastward of Cannon Street Turnpike; it leads towards the Commercial Road.
  • CROSS STREET, Walworth, is the second on the right and left in Locks Fields or Walworth New Town, along Queen Street from York Street towards East Lane.
  • CROSS STREET, Westminster Bridge Road, also called Joiner's Place, is the first turning on the left hand, going from the Obelisk by the Blind School towards the Asylum.
  • CROSS STREET, Wilderness Row, Clerkenwell, is at No. 12, the first turning on the right hand from Goswell Street, and extends into Great Sutton Street.
  • [[CROWN COURT. - 1. is in Westminster, about the middle of the south side of Crown Street, and leads to Charles Street. - 2. is on the south side of Fleet Street, between Salisbury Court and Water Lane. - 3. is in Tudor Street, Bridge Street, Blackfriars, the west continuation from Bridge Street. It leads into Dorset Street, Salisbury Square. - 4. is in Russell Street, Drury Lane, opposite Drury Lane Theatre, and leads into Bow Street, Covent Garden. - 5. is in the Strand, the third turning on the right hand, about seventeen houses from Temple Bar, and leads into Little Shire Lane. - 6. is in Chancery Lane, about ten houses on the left hand from Fleet Street. - 7. is in St. James's and extends from the west end of Pall Mall into King Street. - 8. is in Liquorpond Street, Leather Lane, a few houses on the right hand from Gray's Inn Lane. - 9. is in Sherrard Street, Golden Square, three houses on the left hand from Brewer Street. - 10. is in Little Pulteney Street, Princes Street, Soho, and leads into Queen's Head Court and Great Windmill Street, Haymarket. - 11. is in Little Princes Street, Soho, nearly opposite Compton Street, and leads into the preceding. - 12. is in Dean Street, Soho, the second turning on the right hand, about seven houses from Oxford Street, and leads into Chapel Street. - 13. is in Portpool Lane, about six houses on the left hand from Leather Lane, Holborn. - 14. is in Broad Street, Bloomsbury, and leads into Short's Gardens, Drury Lane. - 15. is in West Street. West Smithfield, the second turning on the left hand, about seven or eight houses from Smithfield, and leads into St. Johns Court and Cow Lane. - 16. is in Butcher Hall Lane, the first turning on the right hand, four houses from Newgate Street. - 17. is in High Street, Islington, the first turning on the right hand, a few yards from the City Road. - 18. is in Golden Lane, Cripplegate, the second turning on the left hand from Barbican towards Old Street. - 19. is in Bell Alley, St. Luke's, the second turning on the left hand from Goswell Street, and leads into French Alley. - 20. is in Milton Street, late Grub Street, Cripplegate, the fourth turning on the left hand, about twelve doors from Chiswell Street, and leads into Type Street, Ropemaker's Street, and Moorfields. - 21. is in Turn-again Lane, Farringdon Street, the first turning on the left, three doors from Farringdon Street towards Snow Hill. - 22. is in Warwick Lane, Newgate Street, the first turning on the left hand, three or four houses from Newgate Street. - 23. is in Old Change, behind the south east corner of St. Paul's Churchyard, opposite Distaff Lane. - 24. is in Whitecross Street, Cripplegate, the first turning on the right hand from opposite St. Luke's Church, Old Street. - 25. is in Charter House Lane, the first turning on the left hand from St. John's Street, towards Charter House Square. - 26. is in Aldersgate Street, about six houses on the right hand northward of Jewin Street. - 27. is in Cheapside, on the south side, about four or five houses westward of Queen Street. - 28. is in Trinity Lane, three houses on the left westward of Bow Lane, Cheapside. - 29. is in Holywell Lane, Shoreditch, the first turning on the left hand from th&#0;???e Curtain Road, or the last on the right hand from Shoreditch. - 30. is in White's Alley, Coleman Street, the first turning on the left hand from Coleman Street. - 31. is in Old Broad Street, on the east side of the church, and nearly opposite the Excise Office. - 32. is in Little Pearl Street, Spitalfields, six houses southward on the left from Great Pearl Street, and opposite Vine Place. - 33. is in Quaker Street, Spitalfields, the first turning on the left hand, about nine houses from Wheeler Street, and leads into Black's Court and Phoenix Street. - 34. is in Threadneedle Street, opposite Merchant Taylor's Hall. - 35. is in Whites Yard, Rosemary Lane, the third turning on the right hand from Rosemary Lane, and the second turning on the left hand from Upper East Smithfield, and leads into Blue Anchor Yard. - 36. is in Jewry Street, Aldgate, about the middle of the west side, and the second turning on the right hand from Aldgate. - 37. is in Sun Tavern Fields, St. George's in the East, nearly half a mile on the left hand from, the Cannon Street Turnpike towards Limehouse. - 38. is in Cartwright Street, Middlesex Street, formerly Rosemary Lane, the fourth turning on the left hand from Rosemary Lane towards Upper East Smithfield. - 39. is in Queen's Row, King Street, Old Gravel Lane, a few houses on the left hand from King Street, or the third turning on the right hand along Prussian Island from Wapping Street. - 40. is in Wapping Street, about a furlong below Hermitage Bridge on the left hand, and leads, to Great Hermitage Street. - 41. is in Wentworth Street, Whitechapel, the first turning on the left hand westward of George Yard, entering at No. 89, Whitechapel High Street. - 42. is in Seething Lane, the first turning on the left hand from Great Tower Street. - 43. is in Narrow Wall, Lambeth, about the third of a mile on the left hand going from Westminster Bridge towards Blackfriars, and nearly a furlong westward of Cuper's Bridge. - 44. is in Horselydown Lane, Southwark, the second turning on the right hand from Broad Street, and leads into Boss Alley. - 45. is at Bankside, about the third of a mile from Blackfriars' Bridge, going towards London Bridge, on the bank of the Thames. - 46. is in Glean Alley, St. Olave's, the second turning on the right hand from Tooley Street. - 47. is on Garlick Hill, two houses on the left hand from Upper Thames Street towards Bow Lane. - 48. called Three Crown Court, or Square, is in High Street, Southwark, about the sixth of a mile on the right hand from London Bridge, and leads into the Borough Market. - 49. (or ALLEY) is in Crown Street, Finsbury, the third turning on the left hand from Finsbury Square towards Sun Street and Bishopsgate Street. - 50. is in the Curtain Road, the first turning on the right hand from Holywell Lane, Shoreditch.
  • CROWN LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY'S OFFICE, is at No. 33, Bridge Street, Blackfriars. It is a recently formed company on the modern system of lower rates and new calculations. It is under the management of 18 directors, of whom William P. Lett, Esq. is Chairman; John Wells, Esq., Deputy Chairman; Joseph M. Rainbow, Esq., Actuary; and T. G. Conyer, Esq., Secretary.
  • CROWN OFFICE, THE]], for the Court of King's Bench, is at No. 2, King's Bench Walk, Temple. The hours of attendance are from 10 till 2, and from 6 till 8 in term time, and from 11 till 2 in vacation.
  • CROWN OFFICE, THE]], for the Court of Chancery, is in Roll's Yard, Chancery Lane. Earl Bathurst is Clerk of the Crown; Edward Wilbraham, Esq., Deputy, Mr Benjamin Pointer, First Clerk; Thomas Jackson, Clerk. The hours of attendance are from 10 till 3.
  • CROWN PLACE, Crown Court, Temple, is the first turning on the right hand from the Strand, near Temple Bar.
  • [[CROWN ROW. - 1. is in Mile End Road, about a mile and three quarters from Aldgate. - 2. is in Walworth, part of the left side of the road, commencing near the Elephant and Castle.
  • CROWN STREET, Westminster, is about the third of a mile from Charing Cross towards the Abbey.
  • CROWN STREET, UPPER]], Westminster, is at the end of the preceding, next Duke Street.
  • CROWN STREET, Soho, is near St. Giles's, and leads from Oxford Street to Compton Street.
  • CROWN STREET, Hoxton Square, is at the south west corner of the square, and leads into Old Street Road.
  • CROWN STREET, Finsbury Square, is at the south east corner, and continued by Sun Street into Bishopsgate Street Without.
  • CROWN YARD, Southwark, is the third turning on the left hand in Kent Street, going from St. George's Church.
  • CRUCIFIX LANE, Bermondsey Street, is about the sixth of a mile on the left hand from Tooley Street, and leads towards Dock Head.
  • CRUTCHED FRIARS, Mark Lane, is the second turning on the left hand from Fenchurch Street. It derives its name from being on the site of an ancient monastery of Crouched or Crossed Friars (Fratres Sancti Crucis), which was founded in 1298, by Ralph Hosier and William Sabernes. They originally carried in their hands, as an emblem of their order, an iron cross, which they afterwards changed for one of silver; and wore a red cross of cloth sewed upon their garments. In the reign of Henry VIII; this monastery was dissolved among the rest, and was granted by the king to Sir Thomas Wyatt, who built a handsome mansion upon the site. The refectory was converted into the first glass-house ever established in England, which was burned down in 1575. On this site, now stands a magnificent tea warehouse, belonging to the East India Company; it is a parallelogram of two hundred and fifty feet in length, by a hundred and sixty in depth, and encloses a courtyard of a hundred and fifty feet long, by sixty broad, entered by a well proportioned archway.
  • CUCKOLD'S POINT, Rotherhithe, is about a mile on the left hand below the church, and leads to the Thames.
  • CULLUM'S STREET, Fenchurch Street, is the second turning on the left hand from Gracechurch Street.
  • CUMBERLAND CRESCENT, Oxford Street, is on the east side of Cumberland Place, between Upper Seymour Street, and Upper Berkeley Street.
  • CUMBERLAND MARKET, Regent's Park, is a new market, recently erected in this improving district, situated northward of Clarence Market, southward of the Regent's Canal Basin, and at the back of Chester Terr&#0;???ace. The Hay Market which has been held for so many years past between Coventry Street and Pall Mall, is being removed, under the sanction of an act of parliament, to this spot.
  • CUMBERLAND MEWS, Cumberland Street, Mary-le-bone, are the fourth turning on the left hand from the west end of Oxford Street.
  • [[CUMBERLAND PLACE. - 1. is in Mary-le-bone, about twelve houses northward of Oxford Street, and extends from Upper Seymour Street to Upper Berkeley Street. - 2. is in the New Road, being part of its south side, and extends from Salisbury Place to Queen Charlotte's Row. - 3. is in the Kent Road, being port of the east side, opposite East Street.
  • [[CUMBERLAND ROW. - 1. is on Kennington Green, at the back of Brookes Place, the second turning on the left hand from Kennington Cross towards the Common. - 2. is in Pentonville, part of the south side of the road, and extends from the turnpike to King's Cross, Battle Bridge.
  • CUMBERLAND STREET, GREAT]], Oxford Street, is the last turning on the right hand before coming to the Edgeware Road, and extends into Cumberland Place.
  • CUMBERLAND STREET, Curtain Road, is the first turning on the right hand, and leads into Plough Yard.
  • CUMBERLAND STREET, Blackfriars' Road, is the first turning on the left hand in John Street, going from Holland Street, Blackfriars', to Green Walk.
  • CUMBERLAND TERRACE, Regent's Park, is the last terrace on the right hand side of the park, going from the Colosseum, before coming to St. Katherine's Hospital, and is the next above Chester Terrace. It is one of the largest terraces in this park of terraces, and has greater pretensions to architectural beauty than any other in its neighbourhood. The prevailing character of Cumberland Terrace is grandeur, arising from a majestic simplicity of, large parts. It consists of a lofty rusticated ground story, above which is an elevation of two stories, embellished with columns and pilasters of the Ionic order. Its situation, for a metropolis, is unrivalled, and the plantations are judiciously employed to set off the architectural and sculptural decorations of the buildings. It is from the designs of Mr. Nash, and may be reckoned among the best of his compositions. For a more detailed account of this and other terraces and villas in the Regent's Park, and other recent architectural improvements in the metropolis, I must again refer my readers to my work of London in the Nineteenth Century.
  • CUMMING PLACE, Pentonville, is part of the north side of the road, and extends from the chapel to Southampton Street.
  • CUMMING STREET, Pentonville, extends from the west side of the chapel to Collier Street.
  • CUPER'S BRIDGE, Lambeth, is about half a mile on the left hand in Narrow Wall, going from Westminster Bridge.
  • CUPER'S GARDENS, are opposite the last, on the south bank of the Thames, and were in 1636 the gardens of Arundel House in the Strand, the mansion of Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel. The premises were afterwards rented by a person named Cuper, who had been the Earl's gardener, and from him they obtained their name. In the early part of the last century, they were much resorted to as a place of public entertainment, where music, fireworks, &c., were exhibited. There were also several statues and other remains of Greek and Roman antiquities, part of the celebrated collection of the earl, which being mutilated and defaced, were not thought good enough to be presented to the University of Oxford, and placed among the Arundelian marbles. Part of these are said t&#0;???o have been removed by the Earl of Burlington to Chiswick.
  • CUPID'S COURT, Barbican, is about the middle of the west side of Golden Lane.
  • CURE'S ALMS HOUSES, College Yard, Counter Street, Southwark, was founded in 1584, by Thomas Cure, Esq., for the reception of 16 poor men and women, with an allowance of twenty pence a week each, and by the addition of benefactions of his son and Mrs. Appleby, each of them receives an additional allowance of sixteen shillings a year.
  • CURRIERS' HALL, London Wall, is in Curriers' Hall Court, four houses eastward of Wood Street, Cheapside, and is a convenient useful structure. The curriers company is of considerable antiquity, since, according to Stow, they founded a guild, or brotherhood, in 1367, in the conventual church of the White Friars, in Fleet Street. King James I. incorporated the society by letters patent, dated the 30th April, 1605, by the name of \\ldblquote The Master, Wardens and Commonalty of the Art or Mystery of the Curriers of the City of London.\\rdblquote This company are trustees for several charities, and, among others, one called \\ldblquote Dawes's Charity,\\rdblquote which is distributed among ten poor freemen of the company, and a sum to bury certain of their pensioners.
  • CURRIERS' HALL COURT, London Wall, is four houses on the eastward of the north end of Wood Street, Cheapside.
  • CURRIERS' ROW, Blackfriars, is the first turning parallel westward to St. Andrew's Hill.
  • CURSITORS' OFFICE, Roll's Yard, Chancery Lane, is an office appertaining to the Court of Chancery, where original writs are made out. This office was originally erected by Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper, in the reign of Elizabeth. The clerks, or cursitors, were anciently called Clerici Brevium de Cursu. They are a distinct corporation, twenty-four in number, each having certain counties and cities allotted them, for which they make out such original writs as are required, and execute their duties either personally or by deputy. The present officers are John Appleyard, Esq., Principal; John Pensam, and Thomas Jones, Esqs., Assistants; twenty Cursitors; and William Bass, Bag-bearer. The hours of attendance are from 12 till 2, and from 6 till 8 in term, and from 11 till 2 in vacation. CURSITOR STREET]], Chancery Lane, is about the middle of the east side of Chancery Lane, and leads into Castle Street and Holborn.
  • CURTAIN ROAD, Shoreditch, is the first turning on the right hand in Worship Street, going from Shoreditch, and reaching to Old Street Road. It received its name from the Curtain Theatre, wherein Ben Johnson, Tarlton and other celebrated actors of that period often performed.
  • CURTIS'S ROW, Broadwall, Surrey, is nearly opposite Cross Street from Blackfriars' Road.
  • CURZON STREET, May Fair, is the first turning on the left in Clarges Street from Piccadilly.
  • CUSHION COURT, Old Broad Street, is the second, turning on the right hand from Threadneedle Street.
  • CUSTOM HOUSE, Lower Thames Street, is about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from London Bridge, and is insulated, having its northern front next Thames Street, its southern front next the river, its western end next Billingsgate, and its eastern end towards Tower Hill.

The earliest building known to have been erected on this spot, for business like that of the present, was in the reign of Elisabeth, but it was destroyed by the great fire of 1666. It was rebuilt on a more extensive scale in the reign of Charles II. by Sir Christopher Wren. This building was also&#0;??? destroyed by fire in 1718 and rebuilt upon almost a similar plan. It was again consumed by fire in February 1814, and rebuilt upon a yet larger and more extensive scale by David Laing, Esq., the architect to the Board of Customs.

In consequence of some defects in the piling, the long room and front next the river were taken down, and the present elevation next the river, which differs much from the preceding, was erected by Mr, Smirke. It is four hundred and eighty eight feet in length, and one hundred and seven in depth. The building is all faced with Portland stone, and the water front is embellished with columns of the Ionic order. The interior is commodious and well adapted to the nature of the business that is carried on within its walls.

The present department of the customs consist of thirteen commissioners, of whom Dean Richard Betenson, Esq. is Chairman; the Hon. Edward R. Stewart is Deputy; Thomas Whitmore, Esq., Secretary; Charles A. Scovell, Esq., Assistant Secretary; various clerks, a comptroller general of the coast guard, superintendent of quarantine, law officers, cashiers and paymasters, inspectors, and a little army of officers, for which I must refer my readers to Burke's Official Kalendar, or either of the Court Kalendars of the year.

  • CUSTOM HOUSE COURT, Beer Lane, Lower Thames Street, is the first turning on the right hand from Tower Street.
  • CUSTOS BREVIUM OFFICE OF THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, is at No. 4, Elm Court, Temple, three houses on the left hand from Middle Temple Lane. The Custodes Brevium are the chief officers of the Common Pleas, whose office is to receive and keep all writs returnable in that court, and to receive of the prothonotaries all records of nisi prius, called posteas. The present officers are, Sir Edward Mostyn, Bart., Sir William Eden, Bart., and Charles Browning, Esq., Cutodes Brevium; George Humphrys, Esq., Deputy.
  • CUTLER'S HALL, Cloak Lane, is the first public building on the south side or left hand going from Dowgate Hill towards Queen Street. It is a small but convenient brick building, conveniently fitted up for transacting the business of the company. The wardmotes for Vintry Ward, are also, by permission of the company, usually held in this hall.

The Company of Cutlers is of great antiquity, for we find them, in 1405, of sufficient consequence to maintain a dispute before parliament, with the Goldsmiths. They were afterwards incorporated by letters patent, granted by Henry V., in 1417, and subsequently united to the Haft Sheath Makers. They are styled in the patent, \\ldblquote The Master, Wardens and Commonalty of the Mystery of Cutlers of London.\\rdblquote They are trustees or guardians of several benevolent charities; one a considerable legacy of Thomas Bache, in 1656, and another of John Craythorne, in 1568, of the reversion of the Belle Sauvage, on Ludgate Hill, for various charities, exhibitions at the two universities, &c. That inn alone produces the company a rent of \\'a31,101. 10s. a year. A very detailed account, of these charities, and the mode in which they have been and are appropriated, are to be found in the Parliamentary Reports of the endowed Charities of the City of London.

  • CUTLER'S STREET, Houndsditch, is about the middle of the north side, and leads into Harrow Alley.

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  • D'ACRE STREET, Westminster, is about the middle of the west side of New Tothill Street, and leads into Great Chapel Street.
  • DAFFEY'S RENTS, Southwark, are the continuation of Glean Alley from Tooley Street.
  • DAGGER COURT, Cripplegate, is in Fore Street, and nearly opposite the north termination of Wood Street, Cheapside.
  • DAGGETT'S COURT, Finsbury, is at the north east corner, between Long Alley and Eldon Street, by Broad Street Buildings.
  • DAKER'S RENTS, Cripplegate, are in Whitecross Street, named after the late Mr. Deputy Daker, who built them.
  • DALBY TERRACE, City Road, is about a furlong from Islington, near the New River, and extends down the City Road. They are named after their first proprietor, Mr. Dalby, the inventor of the present ingenious engine for drawing beer.
  • DANGLE LANE, Poplar High Street, is about a furlong on the right hand from the Commercial Road, it leads to the West India Docks.
  • DANISH CHURCH, Wellclose Square, is the building which occupies the centre of the square. It was erected in 1746, and is a commodious and handsome structure appropriated to the use of the Danes who reside in this neighbourhood.
  • DARBY STREET, Rosemary Lane, is about the sixth of a mile on the right hand from the Minories.
  • DARKHOUSE LANE, Lower Thames Street, is on the west side of Billingsgate Market, about sixteen houses on the right from London Bridge.
  • [[DARK ENTRY. - 1. is the second turning on the left from Aldgate. - 2. is in Lower East Smithfield, facing Butcher Row.
  • DARLING PLACE, Mile End, is in the New Cambridge Road, formerly the Dog Row, the third turning on the left hand from Whitechapel Turnpike.
  • DARLING ROW, Mile End, is the continuation of the preceding into Lisbon Street.
  • DARNAL'S ROW, Bermondsey, is the first turning on the left in Willow Walk, going from Page's Walk.
  • DARTMOUTH ROW, Westminster, is the first turning on the right hand in Dartmouth Street, going from Tothill Street, near Great George Street.
  • DARTMOUTH STREET, Westminster, is the first tuning on the right hand in Tothill Street from the Abbey.
  • DART'S ALLEY, Whitechapel, is the fourth turning on the left hand from the church.
  • DAVID STREET, Mary-le-bone, is the first turning on the left hand in York Place, Baker St